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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Blaine, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Blaine, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Blaine, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Blaine, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Blaine, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Blaine, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Blaine, MN

Minnesota officials break ground on new State Emergency Operations Center funded after pandemic

Minnesota officials broke ground Thursday on a $41 million State Emergency Operations Center in Blaine that will have the capacity to house up to 200 people and act as a central hub for response in any future crisis.The center, slated to open in 2025, has been debated at the Capitol for more than a dozen years. It finally received funding during a special session of the Legislature in 2020 after the pandemic tested the state's ability to coordinate during a public health emergency."Minnesotans don't want to have a tornado,...

Minnesota officials broke ground Thursday on a $41 million State Emergency Operations Center in Blaine that will have the capacity to house up to 200 people and act as a central hub for response in any future crisis.

The center, slated to open in 2025, has been debated at the Capitol for more than a dozen years. It finally received funding during a special session of the Legislature in 2020 after the pandemic tested the state's ability to coordinate during a public health emergency.

"Minnesotans don't want to have a tornado, a flood, a fire or a pandemic ... but they happen," said DFL Gov. Tim Walz. "After the pandemic and civil unrest it became very visceral why we needed this."

Officials activated the state's emergency operations center in March 2020 to respond to COVID-19, stationing representatives from many agencies in one place. That center was up and running for 479 consecutive days during the pandemic and was used during the riots following George Floyd's killing.

But emergency management officials said the crisis exposed shortcomings in their longtime headquarters.

The current center is at the middle of a communications dead spot over a parking ramp in downtown St. Paul, where there's too much street and foot traffic and not enough security, said Kristi Rollwagen, the director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

The space does not have good air filtration, which became an issue when more than 100 people were crammed inside a building that also houses other businesses at the height of the pandemic.

"Trust me, we smell curry every day from the restaurant," Rollwagen added. "It has only one telecom switching station and it does not have adequate cooking, food storage or lodging capabilities for a 24/7 activation."

The new 37,000-square-foot center in Blaine will sit on 20 acres and serve as the headquarters for 65 staffers from the state's emergency management team. During an ongoing response, the building will have surge capacity to house between 150 to 200 people. Staff can sleep there if needed.

Blaine was picked for its proximity to Minneapolis and St. Paul and its airport. The location also offers the space needed to set up security around the facility.

Issues with Minnesota's current facility have been known since after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, when the state asked the National Guard to conduct an audit on the security operations center.

Homeland Security and Emergency Management, a division of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, first requested funding for the building in 2010. Lawmakers funded the project in 2020 and passed additional funding in the 2023 bonding bill, after building costs surged during the pandemic.

"You've got to give people the tools to do their job," Walz said. "The current center is so outdated."

Celebrating the Highway 65 project

Four busy Blaine intersections will be replaced by overpasses in $200 million construction project designed to make traffic on busy road safer, smoother.MINNEAPOLIS — It's been said road projects bring people together.That was definitely the case Thursday afternoon in Blaine, where a bipartisan group of state and local elected leaders marked a milestone in the Thrive on 65 Project. It's the culmination of a seemingly endless endeavor to r...

Four busy Blaine intersections will be replaced by overpasses in $200 million construction project designed to make traffic on busy road safer, smoother.

MINNEAPOLIS — It's been said road projects bring people together.

That was definitely the case Thursday afternoon in Blaine, where a bipartisan group of state and local elected leaders marked a milestone in the Thrive on 65 Project. It's the culmination of a seemingly endless endeavor to remake an accident-prone stretch of Minnesota Highway 65.

"It's just an amazing day for the city of Blaine, to have this realization that this road will get the safety upgrades that it so needs and so deserves," Mayor Tim Sanders told a crowd that gathered in a tent near the highway on a what was a blustery afternoon.

"To be able to serve the North Metro, to be the gateway of the North we are truly grateful!"

The $200 million project will overhaul a stretch of Highway 65 where the rate of serious accidents is eight times that of the average state highway. The corridor carries as much traffic as I-35W. But, unlike a real interstate, it has stop lights and intersections that rank among the most dangerous in the state based on accident counts.

As part of the project four busy intersections -- where the highway crosses 99th Ave., 105th Ave., 109th Ave., and 117th Ave. -- will be converted to overpasses. Frontage roads and bicycle and pedestrian pathways will be added to the thoroughfare.

Rep. Frank Hornstein, who chairs the House Transportation Committee, said he's been hearing about the problems on Highway 65 since he joined the legislature 22 years ago. But this year the stars finally aligned, for a mix of surplus money and bonding funds, to complete the state's $146 million share of the project. The remainder will be financed with federal dollars.

"This is a really big deal! A really big deal!" Rep. Hornstein told the crowd. "But also, the pedestrian safety, the bike safety, plus you're also making it a transit corridor. This is the future of transportation and it's on display right here in Blaine!"

Gov. Tim Walz said Minnesota has a tradition of investing in infrastructure, noting that the state has the fourth highest number of highway miles eclipsed only by California, Texas, and New York.

"It's not just the 72,000 people who live here, but 5.8 million Minnesotans will benefit from this. It's a major artery!"

He thanked Blaine's legislative delegation for their persistence during a very crowded legislative session during which many communities were competing for the same pot of transportation dollars.

Republican Sen. Michael Kreun said fixing Highway 65 was the main reason he ran for state senate, and he feels honored to be part of the large group of players who helped make it a reality.

"I moved to Blaine 21 years ago and I distinctly remember driving up Highway 65. I remember turning to my wife and saying, 'I wonder when they're going to fix this highway'!"

Democrat Rep. Matt Norris said people at the Capitol probably became exhausted hearing him promote the Highway 65 project.

"Governor, you mentioned that every time I saw you, I'd talk about it. My colleagues, I know they got sick and tired of hearing me talk about Highway 65."

Republican Rep. Nolan West said it was important that the north metro's traffic woes get some attention.

"You've got to understand the frustrations we all felt dealing with this total nightmare," Rep. West said, gesturing in the direction of the highway.

"And then we watch the South Metro, the pretty people in the South Metro, get all these fancy roads while we have to live with this disaster behind us here!"

Construction is slated to begin in 2025 and last at least three years. Between now and then engineers will be finalizing the designs while agencies finish buying the property they'll need for the right-of-way along the highway.

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State, local leaders celebrate kickoff of Highway 65 project in Blaine

This is a modal window.No compatible source was found for this media.This is a modal window.This video is currently unavailable.State, local leaders celebrate kickoff of Highway 65 project in BlaineAfter more than two decades of discussion, state and local leaders gathered Thursday afternoon to celebrate the official kickoff of a project to improve safety on a major highway in the north metro.Between state and federal funding, nearly $200 million is earmarked for Highway 65 in Blaine, which has bee...

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State, local leaders celebrate kickoff of Highway 65 project in Blaine

After more than two decades of discussion, state and local leaders gathered Thursday afternoon to celebrate the official kickoff of a project to improve safety on a major highway in the north metro.

Between state and federal funding, nearly $200 million is earmarked for Highway 65 in Blaine, which has been considered one of the most dangerous roads in Minnesota for some time.

RELATED: State funding moves Highway 65 safety upgrades closer to reality

With funding now secured, a group including Gov. Tim Walz, Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) Commissioner Nancy Daubenberger, U.S. Sens. from Minnesota Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith, Blaine Mayor Tim Sanders and several state lawmakers came together to mark the start of the construction project.

It comes as MnDOT’s second closure of part of the highway is scheduled for this weekend. During that closure, which will impact southbound Highway 65 from Anoka County Road 14/Main Street to Highway 10 in Blaine, crews are getting preliminary work done to prepare for the larger project next year. Then, starting in the spring, crews will resurface 14½ miles of the highway, reconstruct areas, install a cable median guardrail and add curb ramps and improved sidewalks to several intersections. However, that’s just the start.

The plan is to put in four overpasses on Highway 65 from 97th Avenue to 119th Avenue. The goal is to start that in 2025.

“To have this realization that this road will get the safety upgrades that it so needs, that it so deserves. For us to be able to really serve the north metro to be the gateway of the north which we believe that Blaine is, we’re super grateful,” said Tim Sanders, Blaine Mayor.

Sanders says the stretch of the highway sees 60,000 drivers a day, and the project will not only improve safety but also reduce congestion.

“As a Blaine resident of 28 years, you’ve got to understand the frustrations that we all felt dealing with this complete and total nightmare,” said Rep. Nolan West (R-Blaine).

While the finished product is still years away, Thursday’s gathering marked a significant step and recognized everything that has been done to even get to this point.

“There is that time with a lot of orange cones, and a lot of folks on the street that people gripe about, that day will come but it’s the other side of that day where we’re all looking forward to,” said Governor Tim Walz.

Metro Transit adds Blaine to State Fair park and ride network

As many as 2 million people will attend this year's Minnesota State Fair — and if battling traffic and finding a parking place does not sound like a good time, three transit agencies are ready to give you a ride.This marks Metro Transit's 31st year of offering express bus service from suburban park and rides, including from Blaine for the first time since 2017. The agency is bringing back service from the north metro after having success filling vacant bus driver positions. And if the favorable hiring trend continues, a fifth lo...

As many as 2 million people will attend this year's Minnesota State Fair — and if battling traffic and finding a parking place does not sound like a good time, three transit agencies are ready to give you a ride.

This marks Metro Transit's 31st year of offering express bus service from suburban park and rides, including from Blaine for the first time since 2017. The agency is bringing back service from the north metro after having success filling vacant bus driver positions. And if the favorable hiring trend continues, a fifth lot in the metro will be added in 2024, said Brian Funk, deputy general manager.

Metro Transit "likes doing big events," Funk said. Drivers, he said, "like driving for happy events."

While not as robust as in the past, when buses ran from a dozen sites, adding the Blaine location mirrors what is happening throughout the system. On Saturday, Metro Transit enacted service changes on 19 routes where buses will run more frequently. That includes increasing service to every 10 minutes on the A-Line, the rapid bus line that stops near the fair.

With the additional local service, Metro Transit's urban core and rapid transit routes are back to 90% of pre-pandemic levels, said Adam Harrington, director of service development.

However, 60 bus routes across the metro remain suspended, he said.

Metro Transit took more than 217,000 people to the Great Minnesota Get-Together last year on express and regular route service, double from 2021, the agency said. The agency will have a booth in the Grandstand to promote its services and answer rider questions.

Here is how to take express buses to the fair, which runs Thursday through Sept. 4:

Metro Transit: Buses will run every 30 minutes from the 95th Avenue Park and Ride at I-35W and 95th Avenue NE in Blaine, the I-394 and County Road 73 Park and Ride in Minnetonka, the 30th Avenue Park and Ride near the Mall of America in Bloomington, and the Cottage Grove Park and Ride on Hwy. 61 between 80th Street and Jamaica Avenue.

Service will begin at 9 a.m. on weekdays and 8 a.m. on weekends and Labor Day. The last return trip departs at midnight, except Labor Day at 11 p.m. The round trip fare is $6.

MVTA: Daily service every 15 to 60 minutes from the Burnsville Transit Station will start at 7 a.m., and from the Eagan Transit Station and Southbridge Crossings Park and Ride in Shakopee at 10 a.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. weekends and Labor Day. Return service runs from noon to 11:30 p.m. (9:30 p.m. Labor Day). The fare is $6, or $5 for tickets purchased on the RideMVTA app.

SouthWest Transit: Service is planned about every 20 minutes Thursday through Sunday and Aug. 30-Sept. 3 between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. from SouthWest Station in Eden Prairie, SouthWest Village in Chanhassen and East Creek Station in Chaska. The last bus returning leaves at 11 p.m. Fare is $6.

DNR: Blaine dried out wells at dozens of nearby homes last summer

State officials say an investigation determined that the city of Blaine’s water supply wells were the main cause of water supply issues that dozens of nearby homes experienced last summer.The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced its findings Tuesday, saying the agency is now working with Blaine and those who were impacted by the city’s well interference on a settlement.The DNR says it got 50 complaints from private well owners in the Blaine and Ham Lake area in the summer of 2022, with residents...

State officials say an investigation determined that the city of Blaine’s water supply wells were the main cause of water supply issues that dozens of nearby homes experienced last summer.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced its findings Tuesday, saying the agency is now working with Blaine and those who were impacted by the city’s well interference on a settlement.

The DNR says it got 50 complaints from private well owners in the Blaine and Ham Lake area in the summer of 2022, with residents reporting their home wells were running dry.

After looking into the complaints, the DNR learned that Blaine was operating three unpermitted wells. The agency relayed that to the city, which then stopped pumping from those wells.

A more thorough investigation showed that 47 of those 50 complaints were valid, and Blaine’s water supply wells sapped water from those residents’ wells. The DNR adds that two golf course irrigation wells also contributed slightly to one case of well interference. The other three complaints had problems that weren’t related to the city’s pumping, the DNR says.

According to the agency, the aquifers in the Blaine and Ham Lake area are very connected, meaning that pumping large amounts of water in one part can cause water levels to drop miles away. And, because domestic wells are typically not as deep as higher-volume wells like the city uses, those residents’ shallower wells dried out due to the city’s pumping.

Since then, the 47 residents with valid complaints have had their water supply restored and the agency is now working with all involved on a well-interference settlement process.

“Like many growing communities, the city of Blaine has been seeking to expand water supply sources to meet the increased water demands of its community,” DNR Conservation Assistance and Regulation Section Manager Randall Doneen said in a statement. “Expansion of water supplies is difficult and complex, especially when a growing community has many neighboring private domestic wells.”

The agency found that Blaine used 1.7 billion gallons of groundwater last year — about five times as much as all other high-volume users in that area combined.

It all came after the city built its Water Treatment Plant 4, which became operational in the summer of 2021. However, the city’s public works head said in a letter to the mayor and city council last August that the city had activated four new high-capacity wells that are part of that treatment plant and “had immediate impact to several nearby wells.” The letter notes that the city paid a contractor to lower the pump so it wouldn’t affect nearby wells but the city received several calls from affected residents.

The DNR’s report shows that those impacted residents had to pay hundreds and oftentimes thousands of dollars to have their wells inspected and deepened so they could start getting water again.

“While we know the city certainly didn’t intend to cause negative impacts on private domestic wells, this situation underscores the reality that Minnesota’s water supplies are not unlimited,” Doneen said.

“Blaine has worked closely with independent consultants and the DNR over the last several years as the city has enhanced our water infrastructure,” Blaine spokesperson Ben Hayle said. “The city has been anticipating the completion of this DNR investigation and is ready to continue to work with private well owners to mitigate impacts that are determined to be related to the city’s growing water infrastructure. Blaine is committed to responsibly providing high quality water service to our growing municipal customer base while also protecting private well owners.”

The DNR says it is still investigating another 24 complaints in the area, and anyone who has had water supply issues that may be due to high-capacity pumping should contact Claudia Hochstein at the DNR by calling 651-259-5034.

The agency has more information on well interference online, and its full investigative findings can be found here.

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