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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Bloomington, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Bloomington, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Bloomington, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Bloomington, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Bloomington, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Bloomington, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Bloomington, MN

Minnesota's bid to host world expo in Bloomington falls short

Updated: 2 p.m.Minnesota’s bid to host a world expo event in Bloomington in 2027 has fallen short.Voters at a Bureau of International Expositions meeting in Paris on Wednesday awarded the 2027 gathering to Belgrade, Serbia — which proposed an expo focused on sports and music.The U.S. bid for a so-called “specialized expo” had proposed a global health and w...

Updated: 2 p.m.

Minnesota’s bid to host a world expo event in Bloomington in 2027 has fallen short.

Voters at a Bureau of International Expositions meeting in Paris on Wednesday awarded the 2027 gathering to Belgrade, Serbia — which proposed an expo focused on sports and music.

The U.S. bid for a so-called “specialized expo” had proposed a global health and wellness-focused gathering in Bloomington, near the Mall of America. It came in third in the initial round of voting on Wednesday, before being eliminated in a third round of balloting.

Belgrade and Malaga, Spain, were the two finalists.

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“While we’re disappointed that we will not have the opportunity to host the world this time, we congratulate Serbia on their successful bid for Expo 2027. We know that they will create a memorable Expo experience,” Bob Clark, co-chairperson of the Minnesota USA World Expo bid committee, said in a news release after the vote. “While Minnesota may not have been chosen as the host, we are incredibly proud of the effort, passion, and commitment that went into our bid.”

Ted Johnson was a senior advisor to the U.S. bid effort and told MPR News that while it was unsuccessful, the state will still benefit. He said it exposed diplomats and business leaders from around the world to Minnesota, its culture and economy.

“During that process, we’re able to not only talk to them about where Minnesota is on a map, but more importantly, what are the values that drive us, who we are as a people — and the business and cultural opportunities,” he said. “(We were) able to brand Minnesota around the world as this health care hub, home to Medical Alley, home to the Mayo Clinic, home to a whole host of great Minnesota companies.”

Minnesota lost a previous expo bid, very similar to its most recent proposal, in 2017. In the immediate aftermath of Wednesday’s vote, Johnson said it was unclear whether the state will make another bid to host an expo that would be held in 2032.

“It’s really hard to say today when we’re, you know, three to five to six years out from the beginning of the next process, whether or not there’ll be that passion or that interest to pursue,” he said. “I would defer that to the future generation of Twin Cities leaders and what they decide in a couple of years.”

Minnesota lawmakers had set aside $5 million to help local organizers pull off the 2023 expo, had Bloomington been selected as the host city. It would have gone toward planning, staffing and city costs.

The budget measure included contingency language in the event the bid was not successful. Instead, that money will flow to the Minnesota Investment Fund, an account that helps finance business expansions that carry the promise of high-quality jobs.

MPR News reporter Brian Bakst contributed to this report.

After failed World Expo bid, what's next for Bloomington?

BLOOMINGTON, Minn. — Bloomington lost out on its bid to host the 2027 World's Fair Expo to Belgrade, Serbia.The Bureau International des Expositions announced the news in a tweet just before 6:30 a.m. Wednesday. The Minnesota city placed third behind Belgrade, Serbia and Málaga, Spain.Serbia's theme for the Expo is "Play for Humanity - Sport and Music for All." Their submission explains that this theme wou...

BLOOMINGTON, Minn. — Bloomington lost out on its bid to host the 2027 World's Fair Expo to Belgrade, Serbia.

The Bureau International des Expositions announced the news in a tweet just before 6:30 a.m. Wednesday. The Minnesota city placed third behind Belgrade, Serbia and Málaga, Spain.

Serbia's theme for the Expo is "Play for Humanity - Sport and Music for All." Their submission explains that this theme would explore play as a tool to build resilience in a difficult world.

Cities in Argentina and Thailand were the other finalists to host the Expo.

Bloomington's plan had been to host it near the Mall of America in the South Loop District. If Minnesota would have prevailed, officials expected the event to generate 17,000 jobs, $364 million in local state and federal tax revenue, and an economic impact of about $2 billion.

Bloomington's proposed theme was "Healthy People, Healthy Planet." Minnesota USA Expo 2027 CEO John Stanoch said that a delegation of civic and elected leaders spent months courting - and counting - potential votes, and they went into the day optimistic that the bid had a strong chance of winning.

"We were disappointed and somewhat surprised," he said. "We expected that we would move into the final two, with Spain, but that was not the case and that's a great disappointment."

Because the votes were anonymous, leaders aren't sure which of the 150+ countries changed their votes, despite written and/or verbal commitments.

"We were optimistic going into it," said Bloomington mayor Tim Busse. "But it's a secret ballot and no matter what folks tell you, you can't be sure one way or another how they're going to vote."

Busse says his disappointment doesn't just stem from the fact that the plans in the bid will never materialize, it's also that the city spent more than four years waiting to develop a prime area around the Mall of America.

Kent Erdahl: "So where does that leave us? Where does that leave this?"

Mayor Busse: "The best thing about what we did with the Expo was we exposed Bloomington, Minnesota to an international development community. All of this is basically a blank canvas for us. We've got the light rail, we've got the airport, the freeways, there are folks who have come forward and we were holding off, because of the Expo, and those conversations have already started."

One of those conversations revolves around a massive $250 million indoor waterpark proposed by the owners of the Mall of America back in 2019. At the time, the Bloomington City Council committed 7.5 million dollars to help move it forward, before the Expo bid came into play.

Busse: "They are still looking at that possibility to develop it in that way. We've also heard from many other folks with different ideas, a variety of different things in the hospitality industry and beyond, that are all possibilities here in the South Loop."

Erdahl: "Any chance the city is going to redouble its efforts and put another bid forward down the line?"

Busse: "Not that I've heard. I don't know that we would want to wait another four or five or ten years trying to get another Expo, trying to figure out the next steps there."

Erdahl: "Time to break some ground?"

Busse: "We're past time to break ground. There's got to be a better and higher use than a surface parking lot here."

Minneapolis Regional Chamber President & CEO Jonathan Weinhagen acknowledged the disappointment that comes with not winning the bid, but says the effort will have big-picture benefits just the same.

“We were proud to carry the official bid on behalf of the United States and we greatly appreciate the support from the White House, the U.S. Department of State, the Governor’s Office and the Expo’s many corporate and business supporters," said Weinhagen. "Our work together showed that Minnesota is worthy of the global spotlight. We made global connections that will continue to highlight our state as a desirable destination for tourism, business, and investment.”

In 2017, Minnesota also submitted a World's Fair bid on behalf of the country and lost out to Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The last time the United States hosted the World's Fair was in 1984 in New Orleans.

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Empty Bloomington office building could see new life as indoor golf venue

A pro golf instructor plans to convert an unoccupied office building in Bloomington into a recreation facility featuring golf simulators and restaurant space.The plan by Ernie Rose includes adding dining space and 23 golf simulators on the first two floors of the 45,000-square-foot Creekridge Office Center. Including acquisition and buildout, the project is expected to cost over $6 million, Rose told the Business Journal.Australian native Rose, who already operates another golf facility called Ernie Rose Golf in Eden Prairie, b...

A pro golf instructor plans to convert an unoccupied office building in Bloomington into a recreation facility featuring golf simulators and restaurant space.

The plan by Ernie Rose includes adding dining space and 23 golf simulators on the first two floors of the 45,000-square-foot Creekridge Office Center. Including acquisition and buildout, the project is expected to cost over $6 million, Rose told the Business Journal.

Australian native Rose, who already operates another golf facility called Ernie Rose Golf in Eden Prairie, became a golf professional in 2001, playing on the PGA Tour of Australasia from 2001-2008. He was also previously the director of instruction at the University of Minnesota for the men's and women's golf teams.

The new facility, at 7807 Creekridge Circle, would look to “add more energy” to the area, Rose said. Sitting just off West 78th Street near Bloomington’s border with Edina, the property is among other office buildings and residential uses across the street.

Plans include reconfiguring the first and second floors of the three-story office building to allow for the golf simulators, restaurant, bar counters and office-flex spaces. The facility also offers underground parking and space for larger groups, Rose said. It will accommodate walk-ins for the public and memberships, he said.

The third floor will remain offices, Rose said. He is looking for a tenant to fill the 16,000-square-foot space.

The office building has been unoccupied for the past two years, Rose said. It is currently owned by Juno Investments, according to city documents.

Changes in office occupancies due to a pandemic-related shift toward more remote and hybrid working have meant that office redevelopments must have "significant amenities," for tenants, according to the conditional use permit application for the project, as provided in city documents. The application notes that the project does this by keeping much of the building for office use, including with a third-floor tenant and office-flex spaces throughout the building, while adding "fun" elements like golf, food and liquor.

All profits from the new facility will go toward Rose’s family’s philanthropic efforts, he said. That includes providing leftover food to those in the community, like those experiencing homelessness, and supporting children waiting for adoption, he said.

Provided the project gets needed city approvals, Rose plans to acquire the property by the end of September and open by December.

The Bloomington Planning Commission is expected to consider conditional use permits for the project on Thursday.

North Kansas City, Mo.-based Pure Design is the architect on the project.

Twin Cities Largest Multitenant Office Buildings

Office space

RankPrior RankName / Rank in 2021 (* not ranked)
11Normandale Lake Office Park
22Capella Tower
33U.S. Bank Plaza

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How the Minnesota mystery of 'Bloomfield bridge' was solved by a curious sleuth

Minnesota is full of iconic, beloved landmarks. But there are lots of other, “functional” landmarks we pass by every day.The story of how one underused, nearly anonymous piece of architecture came to be was nearly lost to time and fading memories. That is, until a man from Bloomington, Minn., spent two months trying to uncover its history.The “Bloomfield Bridge,” as dubbed by the Assumption Church due to its location, is an oddly placed pedestrian bridge crossing I-494, just west of the Minneapolis-St. P...

Minnesota is full of iconic, beloved landmarks. But there are lots of other, “functional” landmarks we pass by every day.

The story of how one underused, nearly anonymous piece of architecture came to be was nearly lost to time and fading memories. That is, until a man from Bloomington, Minn., spent two months trying to uncover its history.

The “Bloomfield Bridge,” as dubbed by the Assumption Church due to its location, is an oddly placed pedestrian bridge crossing I-494, just west of the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. It extends from a Grainger warehouse in Bloomington across a freeway to a Taco Bell in Richfield, Minn.

One day, Tyler Vigen stepped outside of the Taco Bell and asked the seemingly simple question: “Why is this bridge here?”

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While not a journalist but a curious individual, he set out to find the answer. Vigen ultimately found that its purpose served students of the Assumption Church and School who needed a clear path. But he spent nearly ten hours a week each week trying to reach that simple conclusion, parsing through hundreds of archived documents in several states. Vigen was a guest on Morning Edition and shared his journey into Minnesota lore that has gone viral.

Listen to the full interview by clicking the player above.

”I set out to understand more about this bridge, in particular, I learned much more about the area around it,” Vigen said. “I think that people who are reading [my article], though, are interested in how interested I am.”

Vigen drives under the pedestrian bridge on his way to the airport and its purpose nagged at him enough to bring it up to his wife. She didn’t dismiss the idea, and so Vigen was intrigued and determined.

“It didn’t make sense to me why it was there, because it lands in some grass that seems to go to nowhere.”

Vigen’s journey down the rabbit hole began with reading the bridge’s plaque — eventually speaking with parishioners of the church and even the former principal around the time of the bridge’s construction.

He went through several boxes of documents at the Minnesota Historical Society and ended up involving eight federal, state and local agencies in his quest to discover the bridge’s purpose.

He reached the near-end of his goose chase on a trip to the National Archives in Kansas City.

Vigen reflected on his fervor, travels and FOIA requests, saying that he should have simply been talking to more people all along.

Vigen’s final story was about 6,000 words long, with another 4,000 in footnotes. He said it was even longer before his wife Zidi Chen helped him to edit it down. He even went as far as to request permission from the FAA to take drone footage of the bridge, due to its proximity to the airport.

“She helped to make it clear and concise for everyone to read”, he said.

Vigen said the “Bloomfield bridge” endeavor wasn’t planned, so while it’s not on the agenda, another deep dive isn’t off the table.

Give Vigen’s work a read. It’s worth the time investment. And when you do, be sure to click on his embedded footnotes, for extra nuggets highlighting his curiosity and spirit.

Businessman Isaak Rooble seeks open Bloomington City Council seat

With the District 4 Bloomington City Council seat open after incumbent Patrick Martin decided against seeking reelection, Mr. Isaak Rooble, a businessman and past recipient of the “Community Leadership Award” at the 6th annual African Awards, is running to represent the northeastern part of the city that includes the area that ...

With the District 4 Bloomington City Council seat open after incumbent Patrick Martin decided against seeking reelection, Mr. Isaak Rooble, a businessman and past recipient of the “Community Leadership Award” at the 6th annual African Awards, is running to represent the northeastern part of the city that includes the area that Mall of America sits on.

A native of Somalia, Rooble, 36, came to the U.S. in 2011. He and his wife and children have called Bloomington home for the last 10 years. He has an associates degree in applied science from Rochester Community and Technical College.

Mr. Rooble spoke to Mshale after a recent Saturday door knocking exercise accompanied by outgoing two-term Councilmember Martin who has thrown his support behind him, as has the city’s mayor, Tim Busse who has been on the Council since 2011.

This is his first time running for elective office and a win in November will make him the first Somali to serve on the Bloomington City Council. The city is Minnesota’s fourth largest after Minneapolis, St. Paul and Rochester.

“I’m running to make Bloomington an even more attractive and stronger city,” Roble said. “As a community organizer and volunteer, I (have) tirelessly worked to make a positive impact on people’s lives and enhance their quality of life. My unique quality lies in bringing people together and setting a tone for good governance and leadership.”

The seven-member City Council, which includes the mayor, is up for election this year following redistricting. City voters will elect a mayor and six council members—one for each of the four districts, one at large and another two-year term at-large seat. Unlike the four district council members, at-large candidates are elected by voters citywide.

In 2021, the city implemented ranked choice voting for local elections following a charter amendment by city voters in 2020. The system eliminates the need for a primary election which allows for an unlimited number of eligible candidates to file and run for office.

“Our records show this is the first time in Bloomington’s history that the entire seven-person council has been on the ballot at the same time,” City Clerk Christina Scipioni said in a statement posted on the city’s website when candidate filing commenced on August 1. The filing period runs through August 15.

Those that follow him on social media know that Rooble likes sharing updates on what the city is up to, in terms of service delivery for those that might need them, although since campaigning got in high gear, campaign messages have also taken center stage.

His plans for the City Council however go beyond informing his fellow neighbors of what is going on.

“My governance starts from the bottom where I engage my neighbors and discuss issues and decisions that will impact the neighborhood and community at the neighborhood level. I’m not someone who will say decisions will be made at the city hall, I will bring those discussions to the community level environment, where voters and residents can understand what’s at stake and decide. Then, they can send us to city hall to make a final say on what they want and how they want things to be done.”

Rooble says his top priorities are public safety, small business, affordable housing and accessible city services. He believes being intentional in harnessing public input is key to making Bloomington a thriving city.

“In both my public and professional lives, I’ve been a positive, decisive and compassionate advocate for our residents and small business,” attributes he says he will bring to the Council for the benefit of the city.

Rooble says what motivated him to run is the city’s “fast growing, diverse and vibrant community, and the many plans for our city,” the latter a reference to “Forward 2040,” the city’s comprehensive plan adopted in 2018 that guides development and public investments in city facilities and services such as parks, trails, fire stations, roads, sewer and water systems, and housing.

Rooble says he was disappointed when Bloomington lost the bid to host the 2027 World Expo but believes the loss provides the city with a great opportunity to explore other uses for the parcel around the Mall of America that was to be the site for the expo, referred to as the South Loop.

“We have a discussion going on about the South Loop already (and) once elected I am looking forward to bringing the community together on how we can use those resources to move the city forward for the benefit of our residents,” Rooble said.

Register to vote

Election Day is November 7.

While in Minnesota the law allows voters to register on election day at their voting location, registering in advance is highly recommended.

October 17 is the last day to register in advance as a voter.

Register in advance at this Secretary of State website.

Election Judges: The City of Bloomington is also looking for election judges and will provide paid training. Check required qualifications and apply at this city website.

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