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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Brooklyn Park, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Brooklyn Park, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Brooklyn Park, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Brooklyn Park, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Brooklyn Park, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Brooklyn Park, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Brooklyn Park, MN

How did Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park get their names?

A recent trip to visit a friend in the northwestern suburbs rekindled a question that's been on Vince Brown's mind for years:How did Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn Center get their names? And why are their names similar?"I've lived here my whole life and I still don't know how to tell them apart and why they're so close together," Brown said. "What is the history behind that?"Brown sent his question to Curious Minnesota &mdas...

A recent trip to visit a friend in the northwestern suburbs rekindled a question that's been on Vince Brown's mind for years:

How did Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn Center get their names? And why are their names similar?

"I've lived here my whole life and I still don't know how to tell them apart and why they're so close together," Brown said. "What is the history behind that?"

Brown sent his question to Curious Minnesota — a Star Tribune community-driven reporting project that puts readers' inquiries at the center of the newsroom's reporting.

These two suburbs are often confused for one another. But they have some key geographic distinctions. Brooklyn Park is considerably larger in size and population. Its borders partly surround Brooklyn Center, which adjoins north Minneapolis.

© OpenStreetMap contributors

The cities' history starts with Indigenous people who lived on Minnesota land long before the first settlers of European descent arrived.

People have lived in the area that became Minnesota for at least 9,000 to 12,000 years, according to the Minnesota Historical Society. The Dakota and Ojibwe tribes made up most of the state's population by the 1600s.

Dakota people lost their rights to land in much of the Twin Cities area in two 1851 treaties with the U.S. government. This opened the way for white settlers to claim land in what would become Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park starting in 1852, according to "The Brooklyns," a book by the Brooklyn Historical Society that chronicles the history of the area.

"Life for the average new-settler family was not easy," the book stated. "Some had small cabins with, occasionally, a leaky roof, and they had to cook and heat with wood-burning stoves. Toilets were outside, as well as their water supply, in the form of hand pumps or wells."

Early settlers in the area worked hard as fur traders and farmers, according to "The Brooklyns." They grew and harvested food including sweet corn, wheat, potatoes, asparagus, strawberries and pumpkins.

Naming the town

In 1853, Allen B. Chaffee led 14 families from Adrian, Mich., to the area. The families named their new home after Brooklyn, Mich., a township near Adrian that got its moniker from a local minister who hailed from New York.

Hennepin County Library

The New York Historical Society says the Brooklyn borough's name refers to a village in the Netherlands called Breukelen.

Brooklyn Township in Minnesota was officially recognized after statehood in 1858. It covered a broad area that includes the two present-day suburbs.

The new settlers faced much hardship. Esther Crooker's family lived through droughts, grasshopper plagues and other troubles after moving to Brooklyn Center before the Civil War, according to a 1932 Minneapolis Journal article commemorating her 100th birthday.

"Depression? [P]eople now don't know what it is to have hard times," Crooker said, referring to the Great Depression. "Get out on a prairie in the wintertime, in a little rude house with the wind blowing through it, with only the remnants of a crop failure to see you through the winter, miles away from everybody, and you'll know what hard times really are."

Fears of annexation would ultimately prompt both the Brooklyns to incorporate as villages, though four decades apart.

Hennepin County Library

Accommodating rapid growth

The cities of Minneapolis and Osseo were growing, and cities could annex land from nearby unincorporated townships. Residents met in Earle Brown's garage in 1911 to vote in favor of turning Brooklyn Center into a village, bringing road repair, traffic laws and electricity to the area.

It was among many townships near Minneapolis that incorporated in the early 1900s to avoid being annexed.

Brown later earned notoriety as a "booze-busting" sheriff during Prohibition, making an unsuccessful run for governor in 1932. A street and heritage center were later named in his honor. But city officials recently removed his name from the center after a book alleged that Brown was a member of the Ku Klux Klan and vice president of the Minnesota Eugenics Society.

Brooklyn Township became Brooklyn Park when it incorporated as a village in 1954 in order to "hold onto the present size of the township and prevent it from being annexed by land-hungry neighboring villages," according to the Minneapolis Star.

The post-war suburban boom brought thousands of new residents to both areas in the 1950s. Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park became cities in 1966 and 1969, respectively, according to "The Brooklyns."

Brooklyn Center's population of roughly 33,000 people is slightly lower today than it was in 1970, according to the Metropolitan Council. Brooklyn Park's population, by contrast, has more than tripled since 1970 to upwards of 86,000 people today.

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Brooklyn Park Touts Water Quality, Helps Residents With Softening

Residents of Brooklyn Park can take comfort in knowing the city consistently meets rigorous standards for safe and clean drinking water.Brooklyn Park gets its water from underground aquifers that travel to the water treatment plant where iron and manganese are removed before being distributed to households.“The city is in constant communication with the Department of Health on changing...

Residents of Brooklyn Park can take comfort in knowing the city consistently meets rigorous standards for safe and clean drinking water.

Brooklyn Park gets its water from underground aquifers that travel to the water treatment plant where iron and manganese are removed before being distributed to households.

“The city is in constant communication with the Department of Health on changing regulations. We send all of our water samples out for testing to meet their standards,” said Dan Ruiz, Operations and Maintenance Director, Brooklyn Park. “It meets all EPA and Department of Health drinking water standards, however, it is high in hardness.”

Ruiz encourages the use of home water softeners to improve water quality.

Water Softeners Aid in Appliance Life Span

“Hard water is a little tougher on your appliances. It can create corrosion and if you don’t treat for hard water, you don’t get as long a life in your water heater, your washing machine and your dishwasher,” stated Ruiz.

Approximately 40 percent of Brooklyn Park residents have home water softeners, but newcomers to the city may be unfamiliar with them.

“It’s really important that if you have a water softener you fill it with salt pellets as needed and or push the bypass button so that water does not go into the water softener,” said Ruiz. “If not, it could become a Petri dish of crud.”

The cost of a new water softener ranges from $200 to $600.

Brooklyn Park currently has a program where residents can receive a $100 rebate for purchasing a new, on-demand water softener.

Ruiz also highlights the city’s proactive stance in addressing emerging concerns like per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals [PFAS], which have gained national attention due to contamination issues in other regions.

“Brooklyn Park is already testing for PFAS and all of the water leaving our treatment plant meets the proposed EPA standards which is maintaining a standard of four parts per trillion,” he said.

Ruiz also shed some light on seasonal water usage patterns in Brooklyn Park.

“In the winter, the average water use is about 6.5 million gallons. In the summer during lawn irrigation season, it can soar to over 21 million gallons,” he said.

Brooklyn Park and other cities issue water restrictions due to drought conditions.

To manage this peak demand, Brooklyn Park employs odd-even water restrictions, encouraging residents to use water efficiently and responsibly.

Ruiz says that Brooklyn Park is also committed to assisting residents with any questions or concerns.

“If you have any water-related questions or issues at your house, we’re here to help. Give the city a call at 763-493-8007,” he said.

More information about the city’s water and rebate program can be found on the city’s website.

Jenna Gloeb, reporting

Brooklyn Park

Just Sold: Brooklyn Park retail draws $5.23M

Editor’s note: “Just Sold” is a Finance & Commerce feature based on the newest certificates of real estate value filed with the Minnesota Department of Revenue for commercial sales throughout Minnesota and reports of sales across the country involving local parties. Research includes company and broker documents, online real estate listings, F&C archives, Catylist and other research.Shingle Creek Center, a neighborhood retail center in Brooklyn Center, has sold to a local buyer for $5.23 million....

Editor’s note: “Just Sold” is a Finance & Commerce feature based on the newest certificates of real estate value filed with the Minnesota Department of Revenue for commercial sales throughout Minnesota and reports of sales across the country involving local parties. Research includes company and broker documents, online real estate listings, F&C archives, Catylist and other research.

Shingle Creek Center, a neighborhood retail center in Brooklyn Center, has sold to a local buyer for $5.23 million.

Brooklyns Cultural Village in Brooklyn Park closed Oct. 13 on the acquisition from BPC Shingle Creek Holdings LLC in Encino, California. The seller paid $5.93 million in 2017.

The 8,269-square-foot center was built in 1986 on 1.6 acres on an out lot at 6000-6050 Shingle Creek Parkway. Tenants include Lady Nails, H&R Block and State Farm. The building is part of a shopping area anchored by a vacant Target store that’s now owned by the city and is being considered for demolition and redevelopment.

Place: 6000-6050 Shingle Creek Parkway, Brooklyn Park

Price: $5.23 million; $395,000 down payment; new mortgage; 1031 exchange

Buyer: Brooklyns Cultural Village, Brooklyn Center

Seller: BPC Shingle Creek Holdings LLC, Encino, California

Date: 10-13-23

Download CRV

North Shore apartments sell for $1.65M

The 31 Section 8 apartments are modest, but their views overlooking Lake Superior rival those of some of the best resorts along the North Shore.

Those views could be one reason Oliver Companies in Duluth, the longtime owners of Harborview Apartments in Grand Marais, drew a lot of interest before selling to a Duluth buyer for $1.65 million. Heidi Addo and Steve Michel, vice presidents with Michel Commercial, represented the seller. Addo said Oliver has been shedding some of its older and more rural properties to focus on new development. Harborview, built in 1978 has a mix of one- and two-bedroom units aimed at seniors.

Place: 11 E. Third St., Grand Marais

Price: $1.65 million; no down payment listed; $53,226 per unit

Buyer: Harborview LLC, Duluth

Seller: HB/KO Company LLC, Duluth

Date: 10-13-23

Download CRV

Salvation Army worship center in Brooklyn Park reopens, 1 year after arson

BROOKLYN PARK, Minn. — A Salvation Army worship center in Brooklyn Center is back open almost one year to the day after it was vandalized and set on fire.Sunday was about we...

BROOKLYN PARK, Minn. — A Salvation Army worship center in Brooklyn Center is back open almost one year to the day after it was vandalized and set on fire.

Sunday was about welcoming people back into the space after a year of rebuilding and repairing hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of damage.

"It's so good to be in here," said Daniel Simmons, a captain with the Salvation Army.

Simmons and his wife Claudi serve as pastors at the worship center.

"It's mostly good, not just being in there, but seeing the joy in everyone's faces," said Simmons.

Simmons remembers what he saw when he first assumed his position last July.

"Just a lot of equipment everywhere, tarps on everything," he said.

RELATED: Man sentenced in arson that damaged Brooklyn Park Salvation Army

It was November last year when the man responsible was caught on camera starting the fire, breaking windows, damaging offices and destroying hundreds of coats set for donation.

Jack Heinrich pleaded guilty to arson and was sentenced to 90 days in the Hennepin County workhouse and three years probation.

NBA player and Minneapolis native Chet Holmgren donated nearly 200 coats last year, replacing the ones damaged in the fire.

"I think many of the congregation felt very vulnerable," said Simmons.

It's been a process, replacing windows, pulling carpet, and removing all the fire and water-damaged items.

"I couldn't believe what had happened, just one person had destroyed our church," said Lisa Powell, a member of the church.

But the space is now ready to host a Sunday crowd once again, with only a few things left to be added, like pews and a new grand piano.

"It's actually really beautiful to be able to walk into a church and be at home again," said Powell.

"Any tragedy that happens like this, our insurance does cover much of the damage, but one thing it doesn't cover is peace of mind and that, over time, people are learning to trust and open up again," said Simmons.

Despite the damage, Sunday's message was one of forgiveness.

"When I walked in today, I know that by the grace of God, we forgive, you know, just as he has forgiven us," said Powell.

"We all can be at times villains in someone else's story, and so my hope is that if I wrong some body, I hope that they would forgive me," said Simmons.

Plan to replace ice rink with basketball courts stirs up furor in Brooklyn Park

A plan that would remove a public ice rink and replace it with three basketball courts is creating angst in Brooklyn Park, where city officials are rethinking how the community center can best serve residents.The north metro city is looking to spend up to $15 million to renovate the 40-year-old Community Activity Center and add gym space — a top priority since 2018 when voters approved a $26 million park bond.To do that, a leading proposal calls for removing one of two ice sheets and converting it into space for basketbal...

A plan that would remove a public ice rink and replace it with three basketball courts is creating angst in Brooklyn Park, where city officials are rethinking how the community center can best serve residents.

The north metro city is looking to spend up to $15 million to renovate the 40-year-old Community Activity Center and add gym space — a top priority since 2018 when voters approved a $26 million park bond.

To do that, a leading proposal calls for removing one of two ice sheets and converting it into space for basketball, volleyball, pickleball and special events. The community center, built in 1983 and expanded four times since, has one gym but shares the space with the Minnesota National Guard.

This spring, the city secured $5 million in state bonding money specifically tied to such a conversion.

That concerns Sarah Fercho with Three Rivers Figure Skating Club, the biggest user of ice time at Rink 1. Fercho said many groups who use the rink are just now hearing about the proposal to remove it, and feel their concerns and needs are not being considered.

This week, Fercho submitted a petition to the City Council with more than 800 signatures from people who want to save the rink.

"We are not against the use of courts, but it feels like they pitted us against each other, forcing the community to say we prefer basketball over ice sports," she said. "We would like to see more than one proposal."

The idea of ripping out an ice sheet that is booked solid is also a head scratcher for Totino Grace High School Activities Director Mike Smith. The private high school is the fifth-largest buyer of ice time on Rink 1, and the girls' and boys' hockey teams would be displaced if the community center went to one rink, he said.

"The community at large really doesn't know what is cooking," said Smith, who said he heard rumblings in April about the possibility of Rink 1 closing, but it wasn't until Fercho called in recent weeks that he understood the gravity of the situation. "Here is a city with lots of diversities, and instead of meeting the needs, it cuts out a piece and looks to replace it with something else."

Other groups seeking ice time — which is hard to find in the metro — have approached Brooklyn Park in search of a solution. The Rogers Youth Hockey Association even pledged to pay the city $100,000 a year for the next decade to ensure it could rent time.

But city data show the number of Brooklyn Park hockey players has declined, leading some officials to question whether the city should use tax dollars to operate a rink that benefits outside groups.

"That is the question for the City Council," said Parks Director Brad Tullberg. "We are trying to define how the community center is going to serve residents going into the future."

Tullberg said the city has explored adding gym space elsewhere without having to sacrifice the ice sheet, including sports courts at a proposed teen center at Zanewood School. But studies have shown that it was most cost effective to turn Rink 1 into gym space, he said.

Still, Tullberg emphasized no decision has been made, and the recent furor may have resulted due to misinformation that the council was to have voted on the plan this week. Tullberg said the city is still exploring the project — one of the reasons there has not been widespread community engagement.

The city is committed to spending $6.1 million to improve entrances and corridors in the building, a promise officials made to residents when voters approved the park bond, Tullberg said. But the remainder of the project remains unfunded, and nothing is imminent, he said.

"The project has a long way to go even if it is funded," Tullberg said. "We want to make sure we are serving youth from Brooklyn Park. We continue to gather information and share that with the community."

Tim Harlow covers traffic and transportation issues in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, and likes to get out of the office, even during rush hour. He also covers the suburbs in northern Hennepin and all of Anoka counties, plus breaking news and weather.

tim.harlow@startribune.com 612-673-7768 timstrib

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