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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Cedar Rapids, IA?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Cedar Rapids, IA

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Cedar Rapids, IA, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Cedar Rapids, IA

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Cedar Rapids, IA?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Cedar Rapids, IA

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Cedar Rapids, IA

Cedar Rapids school leaders exploring the future of college and career education

28 apprenticeships at St. Luke’s are just the beginning as educators look to prepare students for future careers and answer local workforce needsGrace King CEDAR RAPIDS — Cindy Fiester proudly watched as her 17-year-old daughter Natalie signed on to be a patient care technician apprenticing at St. Luke’s Hospital beginning in January.Before Cindy — now a nurse at Linn County Public Health — graduated from nu...

28 apprenticeships at St. Luke’s are just the beginning as educators look to prepare students for future careers and answer local workforce needs

Grace King

CEDAR RAPIDS — Cindy Fiester proudly watched as her 17-year-old daughter Natalie signed on to be a patient care technician apprenticing at St. Luke’s Hospital beginning in January.

Before Cindy — now a nurse at Linn County Public Health — graduated from nursing school about 30 years ago, she didn’t have the option of working in her career field at a hospital as a high school student. She has watched her daughter Natalie — following Cindy’s footsteps — discover a passion for nursing, first earning her certified nursing assistant license through Kirkwood Community College’s Patient Care Academy.

Natalie, a senior at Kennedy High School, was one of about 28 students Thursday from eight school districts in Eastern Iowa to commit to a 2,000-hour apprenticeship through UnityPoint Health Systems.

“We’re looking for new talent every day. It’s a challenge for us to fill all our roles to meet the needs of the community. You’re in high demand, but we thank you for choosing St. Luke’s,” Casey Greene, marketing president at UnityPoint Health, said to the students.

UnityPoint Health is one of 18 employers in Eastern Iowa working with Grant Wood AEA to place students in health care, welding and manufacturing apprenticeships.

This apprenticeship was made possible through a $1.2 million grant received by the Grant Wood Area Education Agency — which provides educational services to schools and educators in seven Iowa counties — from Iowa Workforce Development to help address the health care workforce shortage.

“They have the skills, the knowledge and the certifications to begin their career in a noble profession in the health care field, and very few students have that opportunity,” said John Speer, chief administrator for Grant Wood AEA. “Very rarely do you get the opportunity in education to go beyond the textbooks, the classroom and your school building. They’re learning in a real-world setting.”

CR schools implementing new college, career education opportunities

Ten of the students who signed on to work with St. Luke’s next year are in the Cedar Rapids Community School District, which promised a renewed focus on career and technical education as part of the district’s strategic plan, approved in September by the Cedar Rapids school board.

Cedar Rapids school leaders have set a goal of to improving graduation rates by 10 percent and ensuring every graduate leaves with college credit or industry certification by May 2027.

“A big goal in our strategic plan is to increase graduation rates with students graduating with something more to add value to that high school diploma. That looks like industry-recognized certification or college credit,” said Adam Zimmermann, Cedar Rapids schools executive director of innovation.

Apprenticeships like the one with UnityPoint St. Luke’s Hospital in collaboration with the school district, Grant Wood AEA and Kirkwood Community College is a good start. But district officials want to begin introducing students to college and career opportunities as early as elementary school.

Implementing that needs to be done purposefully instead of the “haphazard” way it’s been approached in the past, said Tara Troester, Cedar Rapids schools’ content lead for career and technical education.

The school district initially was relying on a portion of a $220 million general obligation bond to fund new career and technical education additions at Kennedy, Jefferson and Washington high schools. The bond was resoundingly rejected by voters last month.

Nevertheless, the work continues.

Investing in the Future Workforce

The school board approved a contract with Steele Dynamics Consulting Services to provide services to develop a three- to five-year action plan to create college and career pathways. The $70,000 contract is being funded by a federal magnet schools grant the district was awarded last year.

As a part of this effort, a task force was created for strategic planning collaboration to provide input on four to six high-skill, high-wage and high-demand career pathways that meet the demands of the Cedar Rapids area labor market, among other things.

Jay Steele, CEO and founder of Steele Dynamics, said the Cedar Rapids school district could begin opening its own career academies as early as fall of 2025. This fall, Steele was in Cedar Rapids to begin developing recommendations for new programming for the Cedar Rapids school district that aligns with career opportunities available in the area.

“In all the communities I see across the U.S., the businesses and postsecondary partners are so willing to support teachers and students in their community,” Steele said. “It’s an investment into their future workforce and into the community where we live and work.”

Steele was director for career education at St. Johns County School in Florida in the 1990s and early 2000s, where he first created and implemented the career academy program. He caught the eye of Metro Nashville Public Schools and worked with them to implement career academies, which lead to the district seeing the graduation rate increase from 58 percent to 82 percent within five years, Steele said.

Introducing students to career education at a younger age can help them explore what they want to do — or don’t want to do — after high school.

“It allows students to go a little bit farther. It’s not only career prep. Kids are choosing their major and getting college credit. If they want to change their minds, for example, ‘I took a health care class in high school, and it’s not for me.’ That is so valuable,” Steele said.

Hiring teachers with the experience and certification needed for programs like engineering can be challenging, Steele said. It can be a “big pay cut” for some people to leave their industry to teach, he said.

He encourages school districts to work with leaders in the industries. Some people, for example, who have had careers as engineers might be ready to retire from their field but want to keep working.

CR schools sees low participation in high school students taking college classes

One of the challenges as Cedar Rapids schools develops its college and career programs will be what to offer on-location at its high schools so as not to compete with Kirkwood Community College.

This could look like adding more intro-level classes for students in middle school and freshman and sophomores in high school, From there, they can advance to Kirkwood classes if interested.

Kristine Bullock, director of Kirkwood Workplace Learning Connection, a career exploration service for 6-12th graders, said it’s expensive to outfit a class for job-specific training. The regional center already has the infrastructure and is available to students in many school districts.

During the 2022-23 school year, more than 1,000 high school students participated in 15 different Career Academies at a Kirkwood Regional Center. The three career academies with the most student participation were patient care; premed, nursing and professional health careers; and advanced manufacturing and welding.

Cedar Rapids schools have among the lowest percentage of high school students taking both high school and college-level courses. Last year, 13.6 percent of students or 667 students total from Washington, Kennedy, Metro and Jefferson high schools were also enrolled in a dual credit class through Kirkwood. The region’s average is almost 26 percent of high school students taking dual-credit classes, a tuition savings of more than $9 million for Eastern Iowa students.

The low participation could be because Cedar Rapids schools offer more Advanced Placement classes — which students, if they pass a test, also can get college credit for — than some of the rural school districts in the area, said Bullock, who sits on the Cedar Rapids school districts’ college and career task force

The other reason is because transportation to the regional center in Hiawatha — which is where students in the Cedar Rapids Community School District would attend — is a barrier for some kids.

“We have to listen to what our schools need and what gaps they have, so we’re not creating something that competes with their programs,” Bullock said.

Agriculture program could be added in CR next year

One example of this is the conversations Kirkwood and Cedar Rapids school leaders are having about launching an agriculture education program, which the school district does not yet offer.

Kirkwood has the highest ranked agriculture program of community colleges in the U.S., Bullock said. “How can we get more students to realize what a great resource they have in their own backyard?”

Zimmermann said two agriculture classes could be offered at the Linn County Regional Center next fall.

Comments: (319) 398-8411; grace.king@thegazette.com

3 partners launch Novy, Iowa’s first venture studio

CEDAR RAPIDS — Three experienced Iowa startup leaders have launched Novy, the first venture studio in Iowa.Novy will co-found, fund and grow software companies starting in the health care industry.Each company will receive up to $1 million in direct capital investment, two full-time executive leaders, in-house product development support, and a full suite of back office services, including finance and human resources, for a total investment of more than $2 million.“There’s nothing like this in Iowa,&rdq...

CEDAR RAPIDS — Three experienced Iowa startup leaders have launched Novy, the first venture studio in Iowa.

Novy will co-found, fund and grow software companies starting in the health care industry.

Each company will receive up to $1 million in direct capital investment, two full-time executive leaders, in-house product development support, and a full suite of back office services, including finance and human resources, for a total investment of more than $2 million.

“There’s nothing like this in Iowa,” said Krista Martin, one of the founding partners. “The venture studio model surrounds founders with all of the resources they need to build rapidly with the appropriate funding, talent and network. I have seen firsthand how venture studios can strengthen the startup ecosystem, and create successful businesses.”

The three partners — Martin, David Tominsky and Eric Engelmann — have worked with hundreds of startups for more than a decade.

Engelmann founded the health care software company Geonetric in Cedar Rapids, as well as the non-profit NewBoCo and its Iowa Startup Accelerator program, and venture capital fund ISA Ventures.

Tominsky founded an IT recruiting company, then led the Iowa Startup Accelerator. Most recently, he was the chief relationship officer at NewBoCo, where he led technical and creative services teams building products and prototypes for startups.

Martin has operated and advised many startups as a product management and growth executive. Before starting her own consulting business, she was the second employee at Boardable and helped grow the business from launch to $5 million in revenue as the vice president of product and growth.

“No one has built a venture studio in Iowa before, so we’re building it from our shared experiences and extensive research into the top venture studios from around the world,” Tominsky said in a news release. “We'll run our ideation and validation phases first and expect to create our first company in 2024.”

Novy plans to build a team of 15 by the end of 2024 to focus on creating and growing highly scalable technology companies in the Midwest.

Highly selective

Novy will be highly selective in the companies it chooses to co-found, expecting only one or two per year, the partners said.

“This fills a major gap in the region,” Engelmann said. “We have venture capital, we have accelerators, we have fractional executives, but it’s piecemeal and fragmented. This brings everything together in one place.”

The team has defined a six-stage process: ideation and validation led by Tominsky; creation and growth led by Martin; and spinout and exit led by Engelmann. The process is designed to repeatedly build scalable health care software companies.

“Novy could be a game changer for some of the health care ideas being formulated at the University of Iowa,” Jon Darsee, the university’s chief innovation officer, said in the news release. “The combination of substantial capital with executive leadership is very hard to come by, and this has the potential to unlock a lot of the university’s research.”

More information is avialable at novyventures.com or by calling the team at (319) 214-0292.

Jo Koy bringing sneak preview of new TV special to Cedar Rapids

Comedian performing Dec. 8 at the Alliant Energy PowerHouseEd Condran During the rare times Joy Koy is home, the veteran stand-up comic just relaxes.“I’ll just be here resting,” Koy said while calling from Los Angeles. “I don’t do anything, since I’m always out on the road — and I’ve seen more cities than anybody in this country because I’m out working so hard.”Koy is con...

Comedian performing Dec. 8 at the Alliant Energy PowerHouse

Ed Condran

During the rare times Joy Koy is home, the veteran stand-up comic just relaxes.

“I’ll just be here resting,” Koy said while calling from Los Angeles. “I don’t do anything, since I’m always out on the road — and I’ve seen more cities than anybody in this country because I’m out working so hard.”

Koy is constantly writing new jokes and performing. He’ll preview material for his forthcoming fifth special Friday, Dec. 8, at the Alliant Energy PowerHouse in Cedar Rapids. His hourlong Netflix special will drop in January.

If you go

What: Jo Koy: The World Tour

Where: Alliant Energy PowerHouse, 370 First Ave. NE, Cedar Rapids

When: 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 8, 2023

Tickets: $45 to $80; creventslive.com/events/2023/jo-koy

Artist’s website: jokoy.com/

“The people who come out and see me in Iowa will see the material from the special before it airs,” Koy said. “They’ll get to know what’s up with me at this age, and what’s going on in my life, and my take on things.”

The observational humorist will riff about life at the midcentury mark, his relationship with his 20-year-old son, and his view of the world.

“It’s wild being 50,” Koy said. “I’ll talk about being at this point, and I’ll have more on my son, and the state of what's happening around us. My son hasn’t moved out and he works for me handling my merch and stuff. A lot of what I talk about is sharing life on the road.”

Koy is at his best when he’s spinning humorous yarns about his family.

“I like talking about what I know because it’s authentic,” Koy said. “I really love it when people come up to me after a show and tell me how much they relate to what I go through. They tell me they have the same experience with their kids.”

When Koy was coming of age during the ’80s, he was disappointed with sitcoms that didn’t feel authentic.

“There were shows with a character who was the tool guy (“Home Improvement”) and a guy who was a doctor (“The Cosby Show”) and it just didn’t look like my family,” Koy said. “There weren’t usually characters like my mother, and when they were, they were offensive.”

Koy’s Filipina mother hoped that her son would follow a pragmatic career path while he attended college in Las Vegas.

“The only problem with that, was that college was just horrible for me,” Koy said. “I’m just not a student. I wasn’t having the best experience in college, but when I discovered the club across the street, that’s when I went to work. That club was my school. The club was the best thing that ever happened to me.”

Koy’s mother begged to differ.

“When I told her what I wanted to do, she said, ‘What is comedian? You don't want to do that. You need a job with insurance and benefits.’ ”

It’s been life without a net for Koy and it’s been just fine. The comedy club on the Vegas strip and a live performance by Eddie Murphy in Seattle inspired him.

“When I saw Eddie Murphy live back during the ’80s, that changed my life,” Koy said. “When he would talk about his aunt and other people in his family, those were people I could relate to.”

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Now Koy jokes about his relatives, who appreciate his career.

“It all worked out because I’m making a living doing what I love,” he said. “All I want to do is make people laugh. I remember my father’s smile when he went with me to ‘The Tonight Show’ and he got to watch me (perform.)”

Koy grew up on comedy from a generation ago, but he realizes he must be careful what he delivers since the world is a very different place.

“Guys like Sam Kinison got away with so much because people had no platform to respond when they heard material from comics like him,” Koy said. “If you step over the line like Kinison did back then today, well, a million people will respond. So you have to be careful about what you say, but you can still be funny. It’s a challenging time.”

Apparently Koy is up to the challenge since he’s headlining big halls and arenas.

“I've worked hard to get here,” he said. “I’m thrilled that people want to come out to hear what I have to say.”

Maddie Poppe returning to Cedar Rapids with holiday show

Iowa’s ‘American Idol’ loves vibe from Paramount Theatre audiencesEd Condran “Christmas From Home,” the title of Maddie Poppe's 2020 EP, fits the singer/songwriter’s acoustic show Sunday night at the Paramount Theatre in downtown Cedar Rapids. The Clarksville native will return to the Hawkeye state for a show primarily featuring holiday songs.“I’ll be doing a lot of Christmas tunes,” ...

Iowa’s ‘American Idol’ loves vibe from Paramount Theatre audiences

Ed Condran

“Christmas From Home,” the title of Maddie Poppe's 2020 EP, fits the singer/songwriter’s acoustic show Sunday night at the Paramount Theatre in downtown Cedar Rapids. The Clarksville native will return to the Hawkeye state for a show primarily featuring holiday songs.

“I’ll be doing a lot of Christmas tunes,” Poppe said while calling from her Nashville home. “Many of the songs will be from the 2020 EP. I love Christmas songs.”

“Jingle Bell Rock,” “I’ll be Home for Christmas” and “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of Year” will be some of the familiar chestnuts Poppe belts out. About 60 percent of the material will be Christmas tunes, with a mix of modern and traditional.

If you go

What: Maddie Poppe: “Acoustic Christmas”

Where: Paramount Theatre, 123 Third Ave. SE, Cedar Rapids

When: 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 10, 2023

Tickets: $32.50 to $42.50; creventslive.com/events/2023/maddie-poppe-acoustic-christmas

Artist’s website: maddiepoppe.com

“Both styles are so great,” she said. “I can’t wait to perform them in my home state.”

The rest of Poppe’s set will pull from her two albums, 2016’s “Songs from the Basement” and 2019’s “Whirlwind.” She’ll also play some fresh material that will be part of a 2024 release.

“I’ll be giving some sneak peeks of the new music that's on the way next year,” Poppe said. “I can’t wait for people to hear it. That’s particularly so in Iowa, which I miss.”

Poppe, 26, relocated to Music City in November 2022.

“I’m where I have to be,” she said. “I’ve made connections and friends out here, and the cool thing is that I’m not so far from Iowa. I come back to visit pretty often.”

‘American Idol’

It’s surprising Poppe didn’t leave for Nashville after winning “American Idol” in 2018, after delivering memorable performances of such classics as the Beach Boys’ “God Only Knows,” Simon & Garfunkel’s “Homeward Bound” and Fleetwood Mac’s “Landslide.”

“I had the most wonderful time on ‘American Idol,’ ” she said. “I learned so much from that experience. What I learned most, which is cliche as it sounds, is to stick to my guns and just be true to myself. It’s not as easy as you think, since this industry is one in which so many doors are slammed in your face. Rugs are pulled out from under you. You learn from it and you move on.

“I took (“American Idol” judge) Katy Perry’s advice to heart, which is to be myself.”

That’s what will make Poppe’s concert special.

“I’m just me up on that stage,” she said. “I can’t be anyone else.”

The holiday show at the Paramount is always circled on Poppe’s calendar.

“I love coming back home for the concert,” Poppe said. “The show I did at the Paramount in 2021 was one of my favorites. The whole vibe of that night was just amazing. I had so much fun. The crowds in Cedar Rapids never disappoint. There’s always so much energy and everyone at that show at the Paramount has fun.”

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It’s not just the shows at the Paramount that appeals to Poppe, who prefers the vibe of Cedar Rapids and Clarksville.

“I miss the normalcy of the small town,” she said. “I like the feel of the small community, where everyone trusts each other and is willing to help each other. But sometimes you have to move away like I did, because of my career. But you can always come back, which is something I love to do.”

She’s taken a new turn in her career, by delegating the details.

“I was self-managing for a few years, but I finally have new management and that frees me up to focus on the music,” she said. “I’m hoping for better quality and quantity in 2024. I’m looking forward to next year, but I don't want to look past this Christmas show at the Paramount.”

Girls Wrestling Roundup: City High Rolls Past Cedar Rapids Washington in MVC Dual

Your Prep SportsCity High defeated Cedar Rapids Washington 57-0 in a Mississippi Valley Conference dual meet on Thursday in Iowa City.The Little Hawks won all three contested matches in the dual with Annabelle Stelpflug and Shaona Emmanuel both winning by fall.Emmanuel pinned Shelbi Novak in 38 seconds at 155 pounds and Stelpflug pinned Sarah Novak in 33 seconds at 145 pounds.Cooper Hamilton won a 10-8 decision in sudden victory at 105 pounds for the Little Hawks.100 &ndash...

Your Prep Sports

City High defeated Cedar Rapids Washington 57-0 in a Mississippi Valley Conference dual meet on Thursday in Iowa City.

The Little Hawks won all three contested matches in the dual with Annabelle Stelpflug and Shaona Emmanuel both winning by fall.

Emmanuel pinned Shelbi Novak in 38 seconds at 155 pounds and Stelpflug pinned Sarah Novak in 33 seconds at 145 pounds.

Cooper Hamilton won a 10-8 decision in sudden victory at 105 pounds for the Little Hawks.

100 – Double forfeit

105 – Cooper Hamilton (ICH) dec. Alex Cherry 10-8 SV-1

110 – Eliza Mitchell (ICH) won by forfeit

115 – Maria Henderson (ICH) won by forfeit

120 – Nina Yankey (ICH) won by forfeit

125 – Double forfeit

130 – Quinn Price (ICH) won by forfeit

135 – Sierra Pruessner (ICH) won by forfeit

140 – Nicole Peterson (ICH) won by forfeit

145 – Annabelle Stelpflug (ICH) pinned Sarah Novak :33

155 – Shaona Emmanuel (ICH) pinned Shelbi Novak :38

170 – Molly Carlson (ICH) won by forfeit

190 – Double forfeit

235 – Double forfeit

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Your Prep Sports

Solon dropped a pair of duals at its own home triangular on Thursday falling to Cedar Rapids Prairie and Williamsburg.

The Spartans fell to Cedar Rapids Prairie 45-24 and dropped a 37-36 decision to Williamsburg.

Against Cedar Rapids Prairie Kara VeDepo (105), McKenna Rogers (110), Kate Richards (115), Alannah Mahoney (125) and Kendall Jensen (170) all earned wins.

Rogers pinned Sadie Reuter in 1:43 at 110 pounds and Richards pinned Abagayle Albert in 5:42 at 115 pounds.

Kara VeDepo won a 4-2 decision over Marie Burns at 105 pounds while Jensen won a 4-3 decision over Brianna Bistricky at 170 pounds and Mahoney won by forfeit at 125.

Against Williamsburg VeDepo, Rogers, Mahoney, Alexis Anderson (135), Olivia Bonnema (155) and Haiden Wolfe (285) all earned wins.

100 – Double forfeit

105 – Kara VeDepo (SOL) dec. Marie Burns 4-2

110 – McKenna Rogers (SOL) pinned Sadie Reuter 1:43

115 – Kate Richards (SOL) pinned Abagayle Albert 5:42

120 – Karsyn Roling (CRP) dec. Irelynd Hagart 4-3 TB-1

125 – Alannah Mahoney (SOL) won by forfeit

130 – Lily Gearheart (CRP) pinned Gabrielle Jedlicka 1:44

135 – Mackenze Childers (CRP) pinned Alexis Anderson :27

140 – Ciara Gomez-Bryant (CRP) pinned Lucianna Miller 1:03

145 – Luisa Meade (CRP) pinned Olivia Bonnema 3:49

155 – Addison Bowman (CRP) won by forfeit

170 – Kendall Jensen (SOL) dec. Brianna Bistricky 4-3

190 – Aliya Phillips (CRP) won by forfeit

235 – Emelia Reyes (CRP) pinned Haiden Wolfe 3:09

100 – Double forfeit

105 – Kara VeDepo (SOL) pinned Anya Rivera 1:44

110 – McKenna Rogers (SOL) won by forfeit

115 – Madison Kirby (WIL) dec. Kate Richards 5-2

120 – Ava Garcia (WIL) pinned Irelynd Hagart 4:24

125 – Alannah Mahoney (SOL) pinned Hayden Wade 3:47

130 – Keston Spratt (WIL) pinned Gabrielle Jedlicka 1:10

135 – Alexis Anderson (SOL) pinned Kaylin Becker 5:03

140 – Valerie Altenhofen (WIL) pinned Lucianna Miller 3:07

145 – Phoenix Gryp (WIL) won by forfeit

155 – Olivia Bonnema (SOL) pinned Kimora Owens 2:24

170 – Lilly Ness (WIL) dec. Kendall Jensen 7-6

190 – Lyndsay Murray (WIL) won by forfeit

235 – Haiden Wolfe (SOL) won by forfeit

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