x
I R C

Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Denver, CO?

lm-head-btm

Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Denver, CO

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Denver, CO, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Denver, CO

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

lm-que

What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

lm-ans

This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

lm-que

Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

lm-ans

The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

lm-que

When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Denver, CO?

lm-ans

When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Denver, CO

lm-head-btm

IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

Contact Us

Latest News in Denver, CO

Timing, totals, impact of Friday’s snowstorm in Denver metro

DENVER (KDVR) — Colorado is going to experience a big weather swing this week. The metro and Front Range are going to go from nearly record-breaking temperatures in the upper 60s to a few inches of snow.The Pinpoint Weather team has been tracking the change coming Friday and has issued a Pinpoint Weather Alert ...

DENVER (KDVR) — Colorado is going to experience a big weather swing this week. The metro and Front Range are going to go from nearly record-breaking temperatures in the upper 60s to a few inches of snow.

The Pinpoint Weather team has been tracking the change coming Friday and has issued a Pinpoint Weather Alert Day due to the drastic change in conditions.

While it won’t be a major snowstorm with high accumulation, the switch from mild weather to snow could cause some issues for commuters.

From timing to totals to impacts, Colorado’s Most Accurate Forecast has everything you need to know to prepare for the end-of-the-week storm.

Timing

Wednesday will be another above-average day in the upper 60s. That warming trend will continue on Thursday with temperatures in the lower 60s, but Thursday night is when conditions start to shift.

According to the Pinpoint Weather team, snow will start in the northern mountains on Thursday night.

By midmorning Friday, the metro will start to get a taste of that snow. The first push will be light.

However, Pinpoint Weather Meteorologist Greg Perez said the majority of the snow will come in a second push in the early afternoon on Friday bringing heavier snowfall.

This storm won’t last long, and snow will linger into Saturday morning before tapering off.

Totals

While the Pinpoint Weather team isn’t forecasting a major snowstorm, this will be the first big storm of December for the metro.

Because of the shift in conditions, the accumulation could take some by surprise.

Here is how much snow the Pinpoint Weather team is currently forecasting as of Wednesday morning:

The Pinpoint Weather team will continue to fine-tune and update the totals as Friday gets closer.

Impact

This will be the first snowstorm of the meteorological winter and the first measurable snowfall in over a month for the Front Range.

Traffic will have the biggest impact on Friday as temperatures drop and snow continues to fall.

Since the biggest snowfall is expected to happen in the early afternoon, those commuting home from work and school may be met with slick and snowy roads.

Temperatures will be a bit above freezing, but the snow may cause a messy commute. If you can leave work early, that may help escape the traffic jam on the way home.

Aurora residents displaced after Denver leases motel for migrants

Hundreds of migrants who arrived in Denver last month are being sheltered in Aurora. When they checked into the motel, residents who'd been living there for months say they were pushed out.The City of Denver is currently providing shelter to more than 2,600 migrants. About 400 of them are staying at the Quality Inn in Aurora. The city says it leased the motel after hundreds of migrants arrived on Than...

Hundreds of migrants who arrived in Denver last month are being sheltered in Aurora. When they checked into the motel, residents who'd been living there for months say they were pushed out.

The City of Denver is currently providing shelter to more than 2,600 migrants. About 400 of them are staying at the Quality Inn in Aurora. The city says it leased the motel after hundreds of migrants arrived on Thanksgiving.

Joe Sauceda, his partner and their dog have lived at that Quality Inn for nearly a year. When they went to extend their stay, the couple was told the motel could no longer accommodate them.

"We slept in our car Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday. It's been cold. We have blankets but still, it was rough." said Sauceda. "People who were staying there, some of them were older. They've been there for years. Where did they go?"

Sauceda works at JJ's Place, a sports bar owned by Aurora councilwoman Danielle Jurinsky. She shared her frustration over Sauceda's displacement at Monday's council meeting.

"The city of Aurora is not a sanctuary city. However, Denver prides themself on being a sanctuary city," she said. "This is Denver Mayor Mike Johnston bussing migrants into the city of Aurora, taking up hotels, and throwing American citizens, Aurora residents onto the streets."

In a statement, the City of Aurora writes:

"Denver's decision to transport migrants to a privately owned hotel in Aurora was Denver's decision alone. While Denver provided a general heads up to Aurora about this possibility over the last several weeks, they have not communicated how they will provide resources to the migrants including food, transportation and other services. It would be helpful to understand their plan for these people to get them the resources they need.

It is our understanding that Denver Human Services is leading this effort and should be able to provide more information. We are unable to speak to any specific circumstances of the situation given our limited knowledge of what has transpired.

Without any city-owned shelter space or related infrastructure for migrants, Aurora is currently limited in its ability to house individuals. The city is not structured like the counties that are funded to provide health and human services. We embrace our culturally rich and diverse community and maximize our existing resources as efficiently as possible, but they are not limitless."

In a statement, the office of Mayor Mike Johnston writes:

"This facility was opened in late November with the understanding and cooperation of Aurora and Arapahoe County officials.

Nearly 300 people arrived in Denver on Thanksgiving Day, and we worked quickly to bring on hundreds of rooms to help people get out of the cold. Once we realized other guests had been displaced to another hotel in the chain, we immediately worked with the hotel operator to ensure those guests could return at the same extended-stay rate. The operator also offered to provide those guests with a free week's stay. We will continue to reinforce that we never want to displace guests."

As Saucedo moves back into the motel, he worries this could happen to more people as migrants continue to trickle into Aurora.

"I know they're trying to better themselves by coming here. But the fact is we have our own people that we need to take care of," said Sauceda.

Tori Mason

Tori Mason is a reporter at CBS News Colorado. Read her latest reports or check out her bio and send her an email.

Twitter Facebook

Black Santa comes to Colorado to inspire kids and create community

'Tis the season for Santa to come visit kids all across America in this nation's shopping malls. A unique Santa has stopped by the Cherry Creek Shopping Center this week.This Santa Claus is a Black Santa. He visited children at the mall for four days, two in November and two in December. Seven-year-old Hailyn Smith's mom Kristy pulled her out of school and drove up to Denver from Colorado Springs for her first-time meeting Santa. Kristy says this was the right time and the right Santa."You don't see a lot of people that lo...

'Tis the season for Santa to come visit kids all across America in this nation's shopping malls. A unique Santa has stopped by the Cherry Creek Shopping Center this week.

This Santa Claus is a Black Santa. He visited children at the mall for four days, two in November and two in December. Seven-year-old Hailyn Smith's mom Kristy pulled her out of school and drove up to Denver from Colorado Springs for her first-time meeting Santa. Kristy says this was the right time and the right Santa.

"You don't see a lot of people that look like us around here so to actually have a (Black) Santa Claus for a small little kid…that's basically why it was so important," said Kristy.

Santa wants all kids, no matter their skin color, to feel special for Christmas and all year round. Which is why he is happy to be in Colorado.

"It lets them know that they can aspire to be anybody or anything they want to be and I think that it gives them a sense of pride, a sense of belonging, a sense of community," said Santa.

He says the smiles on the kids' faces are what motivates him to travel the country making appearances.

"It's all about the kids and the magic of Christmas and them being able to feel like that they're the only one in the room and when they smile and holler, 'Santa!' It just brings me so much joy, so much happiness and puts a great big smile on my face as well," said Santa.

This particular Santa will be appearing at the Cherry Creek Shopping Center on Dec. 6 and 7 from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m.

Michael Abeyta

Michael Abeyta is a general assignment reporter/MSJ for CBS News Colorado. Read his latest reports or check out his bio and send him an email.

Twitter Facebook

Construction litigation blocking condo development in Colorado, but how does it get unblocked?

Where Shelby’s Bar & Grill long stood on the corner of 18th and Glenarm streets, and before that the old Broadway Hotel, two towers are rising that will provide 461 for-sale condos, defying the odds in more ways than one.The project represents a vote of confidence in downtown Denver at a time when office vacancy rates have soared above 30% and remote work has left the future of central business districts uncertain.And it conveys a degree of faith by Amacon, the Canadian developer behind the project, that Colorado&rsqu...

Where Shelby’s Bar & Grill long stood on the corner of 18th and Glenarm streets, and before that the old Broadway Hotel, two towers are rising that will provide 461 for-sale condos, defying the odds in more ways than one.

The project represents a vote of confidence in downtown Denver at a time when office vacancy rates have soared above 30% and remote work has left the future of central business districts uncertain.

And it conveys a degree of faith by Amacon, the Canadian developer behind the project, that Colorado’s litigious environment around construction defects won’t come back to bite it once it completes the city’s largest condo project since 2009.

“We have been visiting Denver for years and over time we fell in love with the city and realized early on there was a need for and shortage of homes,” said Stephanie Babineau, vice president of sales and marketing with Amacon, which is based in Vancouver, British Columbia.

About 70% of residents in central Denver are renters, and only 30% are owners, she said, and Amacon expects to find a willing market for its luxury condos with their high-end finishes and central location.

The company has lined up its insurance coverage, is confident in its quality control measures and is pushing toward a 2025 completion date for its 38-story and 32-story towers, which will include structured parking and ground-floor retail.

“This is what we do all day — build condos. It seems like there weren’t that many developers willing to take on that risk,” Badineau said.

That wasn’t always the case. Before 2007, about one in five homes built in Colorado were condos, and many of those targeted first-time buyers transitioning from renting, Ted Leighty, CEO of the Colorado Association of Homebuilders, said during a panel on construction litigation reform hosted by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce on Nov. 8.

Currently, condos are running closer to one in 20, or about 3% to 6% of the total. Most of the condos getting built are high-end, like what Amacon is building in Denver. Although there was a brief spike in condo construction following defects litigation reforms in 2017, that quickly faded.

In 2005, there were more than 4,000 permits pulled for condos, according to a white paper on the lack of condo construction in the state, by Peter LiFari, a housing fellow at the Common Sense Institute and CEO of Maiker Housing Partners, a developer and operator of affordable housing based in Adams County.

Last year, there were only 515, despite the new rules in 2017 that required a majority of homeowners in an association to vote in favor of pursuing a lawsuit rather than just the board. The change was designed to make sure homeowners understood the road they were taking when they moved to litigate.

It isn’t that developers have shifted their focus away from multi-family to single-family. For every new condo built in Colorado, there are 14 new apartments built. In the ’00s, before the housing crash, that ratio was close to 1 condo for every 1.25 apartments, LiFari found.

Viewed another way, condo construction from 2018 to 2022 ran 76% lower than what it was from 2002 to 2008. Buyers are desperate for entry-level condos when they do come up on the resale market, a sign that new ones would also be snapped up if they were built.

Litigation, however, has greatly reduced the number of insurers and developers alike who are willing to tackle new condominiums. From 2007 to 2022, the number of condo developers in the state has dropped from 146 to 23, LiFari found.

While the housing downturn and financial crisis wiped out a large number of developers of all types, construction levels for single-family homes and apartments have rebounded. That isn’t the case for condos.

“This stark decline underscores the significant impact of construction liability litigation laws on the willingness of developers to engage in condominium projects,” he writes.

Kevin Walsh, an attorney with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck who has both pursued and defended construction defect cases, said Colorado’s system is designed in a way that drives up costs without always resolving problems.

Plaintiff attorneys are paid primarily on a contingency basis with fees typically about 35% of damages. They are incentivized to scour for every defect possible once a case is opened and get the highest settlement or judgment possible.

They also bring in third-party contractors who charge 30% to 50% above the going rate for repair work. One reason contractors overcharge is that they fear being sued themselves and need to cover future liabilities. Colorado’s defects litigation system remains so broken that it has scared away insurers.

“There is only one insurance carrier in Colorado willing to cover condos,” he said during the chamber panel.

That contributes to much higher premiums than what a competitive market would generate. Given all the other escalating costs developers face from land to labor to soaring interest rates, higher insurance costs can make a project untenable and the fear of litigation makes them unpalatable.

Insurance premiums now account for 5.5% of the “hard” costs of building a condo compared to rates of 1.1% to 1.6% for apartments and other multifamily rental projects, LiFari estimates.

Whatever changes the state has made to address the construction defects litigation issue haven’t been enough in the eyes of insurers, and because of that, it isn’t enough for developers.

“It has driven us out of the market we are not alone. We have to make a change,” said Carl Koelbel, chief operating officer at Koelbel and Co.

Developers are fully aware that entry-level condos are desperately needed, and that they would sell quickly if they were built, benefitting people.

But because of insurance costs and fear of litigation, Koebel said his company will no longer touch them. The cheapest townhome the company can build in metro Denver right now is in the low $500,000s and that is hardly entry-level.

Resolving construction defects litigation is important but there are other roadblocks that need to be addressed, Koelbel said. Zoning restrictions and the lack of available land work against condo construction, and so does what Koelbel refers to as “bureaucratic gumming up.”

Even a use-by-right project, considered the easiest to get through the planning process, took more than three years for his company to get approval, he said. There was nothing expedited about the process.

What is needed

LiFari, in his white paper, doesn’t argue for repealing the existing Colorado Construction Defect Action Reform Act (CDARA), which was passed in 2001 and modified in 2003. The act tried to push disputes more toward arbitration or mediation, but many cases are still ending up in the courts.

He argues for the implementation of a “strategic series of incremental reforms” that balances the protections offered to homeowners and developers. One would involve creating a statewide warranty standard that would provide developers who meet specific quality levels of construction established by the state extra legal protections.

Another reform would require individual parties involved in the construction process to take specific responsibility for their expertise. A licensed plumber or electrician, any subcontractor for that matter, would be responsible for the work they do, rather than the developer, who is almost always at the center of defect disputes. Likewise, contractors wouldn’t get dragged into litigation that is the developer’s fault.

He also argues for stronger language to allow a right to remedy, meaning the responsible party has a right to fix a defect promptly or assign a qualified third party to fix it. One model could follow the state’s “lemon laws” where a car manufacturer is allowed to fix a defective car or if they can’t, a third-party vendor can be brought in.

“We can’t build perfect homes,” Leighty said, adding a way needs to be found that addresses defects when they do arise that won’t do long-term damage to either side and to Colorado’s housing market as a whole.

Denver attorney Chad Johnson, who represents homeowners and homeowners associations, said impacted property owners typically only consult an attorney after they have failed to get a contractor or builder to resolve a problem. It is not something they take lightly.

“They have spent more time trying to vilify homeowners and HOAs for discovering their defects than they have been to tighten up their own practices. I haven’t seen any difference in construction practices. We are busier than ever,” he said.

Of around 1,000 requests he has filed under CDARA to request mediation or arbitration and avoid costly legal battles, none have been honored, Johnson said, adding that insurers encourage their clients to stretch out and delay cases rather than resolve them by making satisfactory repairs.

“I have had brand-new homes that have collapsed, where that builder and that insurer should know they will have to pay. They will do everything in their power to drag it out. It is a game of delay,” he said.

Johnson said many of the reforms builders have sought in the past failed because they don’t get to the core of the problem: bad construction practices. He disagrees that separating out liability among different parties is an answer. Owners often don’t know what specific contractors were involved in building their condos and homes and can obtain that information only from the developer or builder.

“A builder is 100% responsible for what they build. That would be a big mistake for a lot of reasons,” he said of separating out liability. Also, developers have contractual relationships with their subcontractors and can go back and sue them because of their shoddy work.

Changes made in 2017 requiring a majority of owners in a community to approve defects litigation also didn’t stem the tide, because builders were offering inadequate solutions when problems arose and losing the votes, he said.

He agrees that insurance is an important part of the equation and argues that solutions can be found. But he said insurers need to provide more information about the claims they are paying out, how they determine premiums, and why they are averse to lower-cost solutions like mediation.

“Immunity from defects won’t solve the problem,” he said. “You are just passing on the cost of fixing these builder mistakes.”

Warm and windy Thursday in Colorado ahead of the cold and snow

While temperatures will stay above average on Thursday afternoon, winds will begin to pick up ahead of an approaching cold front.There is a High Wind Warning through 5 p.m. on Thursday for the Northern Front Range, Western Slope, and Foothills where sustained winds will blow around 35-40 mph, at times gusting as high as 80 mph.Temperatures on Thursday will warm into the mid-60s for the Denver metro and Front Range. This will be the last of the warm days for the extended forecast.The approaching cold front will bring a ro...

While temperatures will stay above average on Thursday afternoon, winds will begin to pick up ahead of an approaching cold front.

There is a High Wind Warning through 5 p.m. on Thursday for the Northern Front Range, Western Slope, and Foothills where sustained winds will blow around 35-40 mph, at times gusting as high as 80 mph.

Temperatures on Thursday will warm into the mid-60s for the Denver metro and Front Range. This will be the last of the warm days for the extended forecast.

The approaching cold front will bring a roughly 30-degree drop in afternoon high temperatures with snow moving in overnight into the mountains. Snow will become more widespread tomorrow mid-morning, and last through early Saturday morning.

Winter Weather Advisories are in place for the mountains from Thursday through Saturday. The Rabbit Ears Pass, Park, and Elkhead areas could receive 5-10" of snow, with 4-8" expected elsewhere in the mountains.

In the Denver metro, roughly 2-4" of snow will fall between Friday and early Saturday morning, with 3-6" expected along the Palmer Divide and the Foothills. Flakes will begin flying in the morning, but at this time it looks like most of the accumulating snow will fall during the afternoon hours on Friday, which could make for a slow and slick evening commute.

Most of the snow will clear out early Saturday morning. Temperatures on Saturday will stay cold, with highs only warming into the mid to upper 30s.

Alex Lehnert

First Alert Meteorologist Alex Lehnert provides the weather forecast on CBS Colorado Mornings. Catch her latest First Alert Weather updates CBS News Colorado -- on TV and on our free streaming service. Check out her bio.

Facebook Instagram

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.