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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Des Moines, IA?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Des Moines, IA

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Des Moines, IA, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Des Moines, IA

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Des Moines, IA?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Des Moines, IA

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Des Moines, IA

$10,000 of Pork Donated to Iowa Food Banks as Need Soars

DES MOINES, IOWA (December 8, 2023) — The Iowa Pork Producers Association (IPPA) donated $10,000 worth of pork Friday to help fight food insecurity in central Iowa. That translates to about 14,400 meals, divided between the Food Bank of Iowa and the Des Moines Area Religious Council (DMARC).The Food Bank of Iowa and DMARC, both based in Des Moines, each received 1,800 pounds of ground pork. The donations stemmed from IPPA’s ...

DES MOINES, IOWA (December 8, 2023) — The Iowa Pork Producers Association (IPPA) donated $10,000 worth of pork Friday to help fight food insecurity in central Iowa. That translates to about 14,400 meals, divided between the Food Bank of Iowa and the Des Moines Area Religious Council (DMARC).

The Food Bank of Iowa and DMARC, both based in Des Moines, each received 1,800 pounds of ground pork. The donations stemmed from IPPA’s BBQ and Brew at the Ballpark event in July.

“The holiday season is upon us and addressing food insecurity is vital this time of year,” said IPPA President-Elect Matt Gent, a pig farmer from Wellman. “Pork producers care about their communities, and this is one of the many ways we give back. Pork is a rich source of protein and it’s very versatile. We hope these donations help a lot of folks who may not have regular access to hearty, nutritious meals.”

IPPA and its county affiliates across the state have provided tens of thousands of meals for underprivileged Iowans this year.

“Right now, food insecurity is nothing short of an emergency in our community,” said Matt Unger, CEO at DMARC, a non-profit that operates a Food Pantry Network in the Des Moines metro. “The Food Pantry Network assisted 26,469 individuals in November — the most people ever assisted in one month.

“Thank you to Iowa’s pork producers for choosing to support DMARC during this especially busy holiday season,” he added. “These donations are some of the most requested items at our pantries.”

Caring for the community is one of the core principles for Iowa pig farmers. These donations will help children, families, and seniors who are struggling with hunger.

“I have raised hogs, so I understand the tremendous value of this generous donation,” said Michelle Book, CEO of the Food Bank of Iowa. “Ground pork is tasty, versatile, and packed with protein — protein which is much needed right now by families struggling to make ends meet and folks living on fixed incomes. As the need for food assistance increases, we are grateful for our partnership with the Iowa Pork Producers Association.”

About the Iowa Pork Producers Association:

The mission of the Iowa Pork Producers Association is promoting, educating, and providing a leading voice for a sustainable, socially-responsible, and globally-competitive pork industry. Visit IowaPork.org for more information.

North High School students shoot for the moon in NASA's App Development Challenge

Five students from North High School showcased their project as part of a national competition held by NASA on Friday, Dec. 8."Given the data from NASA, we collaborate, problem-solve, and create, putting our love of technology, science, and math together," said student leader junior Sujal Pokhrel in an email to the Register.The NASA ...

Five students from North High School showcased their project as part of a national competition held by NASA on Friday, Dec. 8.

"Given the data from NASA, we collaborate, problem-solve, and create, putting our love of technology, science, and math together," said student leader junior Sujal Pokhrel in an email to the Register.

The NASA App Development Challenge (ADC) is an annual coding competition for middle and high school students across the country, requiring the creation of a moon region visualization for mission planning.

According to NASA's website, this year "teams of middle school or high school teams have 10 weeks to submit a video showcasing their app to visualize the South Pole region of the Moon utilizing lunar terrain data and display essential information for navigation and communication."

This app is specially geared towards the landing of Artemis, which will be the hub of the next moon landing.

There are more than 100 teams entered in the competition, and North High School is home to the only team from Iowa: Frostbyte.

Alongside Pokhrel, the team is made up of junior Champ-Pacifique Mukiza, junior Jefrey Alen, virtual campus junior Moss Louvan and sophomore Romas Pokhrel.

"Our process through this project was certainly not a smooth and easy road," Mukiza said. " … initially, we began this project by understanding what roles we each would have."

And, from there, Frostbyte was born.

What does Frostbyte's app do?

While the project Frostbyte completed isn't like the apps you download on your phone, the group made a project that shows what a landing on the moon may look like based upon the data NASA had given them.

The data included images of Artemis locations, research regarding the moon's terrain, visibility and slope.

With this information, Frostbyte used software such as Python, along with the help of their club advisor Jessi Nunes, an educator at North High School. The software allowed them to create 3D visualizations of the moon's surface and used that to decipher where and how landing might work in the most favorable manner.

The team jumped through hurdles like the foreignness of visualizing data on a plane they had never worked on before and had to figure out how to use their resources to translate it into something that they did know how to work with: Cartesian coordinates.

Rachel Shannon, assistant director for Education and Outreach at NASA Iowa Space Grant Consortium and assistant teaching professor with the electrical and computer engineering department at Iowa State University said Frostbyte's project rivals what she sees her students do.

"Oftentimes, one of the hardest things in science as an engineer, a scientist, is communicating," Shannon said. "We're so technical, but the fact that they can just speak about all the technical things that they learned is such an easy way to understand, that is a hard skill."

Why is this NASA challenge so important?

It's more than just winning a competition to Frostbyte, it's about fostering STEM education and introducing it to young students.

"Their (STEM and NASA's) development affects all of humanity, being engrained and normalized in society, helping everyone with their daily lives," Louvan said. "We want to be a part of that change."

Des Moines Public Schools Superintendent Ian Roberts attended Frostbyte's presentation, making a promise to fulfill what they need to be successful and what others need to get involved.

"Science, technology, engineering and math is here to stay," Roberts said. "We know that when students are exposed to classes that are connected to those, it increases critical thinking skills and teamwork … I want to make sure that we're investing and allocating resources to STEM projects."

About the NASA App Development Challenge

According to the ADC, the challenge started at the beginning of October, and teams have until Dec. 13 to conclude their submission with a video submission.

Once certain submissions move forward in the competition, teams will present their app in an interview with NASA subject matter experts from NASA's Space Communication and Navigation program.

Once interviews are completed, several teams will rise to the top and have the chance to visit the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas in April 2024.

It's not just about winning, it's about the journey

"I can tell you that the commitment I have seen has been the very definition of polar bear pride," Nunes said. "… I could not be more proud of these young scholars."

While their journey is soon coming to an end with the last deadline of Dec. 13 coming up, Frostbyte is already working on their plans for next year, including an app, wider outreach, a bigger team and more diversity.

"We definitely want to do this again next year," Muzika said. "We want to include more students, we want to include more from across DMPS."

As for their future plans, they're ready to be taken anywhere. After all, they're bright young scholars ready to take on the world and the stars.

"As you can tell, we're nerds," Sujal said.

Kyle Werner is a reporter for the Register. Reach him at kwerner@dmreg.com.

Best holiday lights mapped, from public displays to neighborhood hot spots in Des Moines

As central Iowa slips closer to winter, one of the area’s favorite traditions lights up the skies at night — festive lights festooning houses decorated with inflatables, holiday-themed décor, and trees. Clark Griswold would be proud.While you could randomly drive around the metro to find the best lights, we compiled a guide with points from Ankeny to Norwalk. This guide covers neighborhoods that get together to decorate homes, churches with lighted displays, and professional light displays from cities...

As central Iowa slips closer to winter, one of the area’s favorite traditions lights up the skies at night — festive lights festooning houses decorated with inflatables, holiday-themed décor, and trees. Clark Griswold would be proud.

While you could randomly drive around the metro to find the best lights, we compiled a guide with points from Ankeny to Norwalk. This guide covers neighborhoods that get together to decorate homes, churches with lighted displays, and professional light displays from cities, charitable organizations and communities.

Here is our interactive map of holiday lights that you can click on to see addresses and what to expect.

More:Looking for Santa? Here's where to find him around Des Moines for a picture this season

Best public lighting displays in the Des Moines metro

Ankeny

1023 NW 32nd St.: This house comes with Christmas lights that blink and change in time with songs such as "Little Drummer Boy" or "Dueling Jingle Bells." Visitors can tune their radios to 94.7 FM to enjoy the show.

4118 SW Snyder Blvd.: This synchronized light show has been an Ankeny favorite since 2014.

705 N.E. Canterbury Drive: This light show includes 7,000 bulbs synchronized to four holiday songs.

S.E. Richland Court: Richland Court in Ankeny turns into Gingerbread Lane, with each home decorated and festooned with signs telling the story of the gingerbread boy. Bring canned goods that are donated to Food Bank of Iowa every weekend.

1832 S.E. Hillside Drive: Tune to FM 95.5 to enjoy a variety of family-friendly songs sequenced with the lights on this home in Ankeny.

S.E. Rio Circle: The homes on this cul-de-sac in Ankeny south of Southeast Eighth Street tell the story of Frosty the Snowman through lights.

1335 N.E. Milan Ave.: The animated displays at this Ankeny home change every year. Previous displays included Frosty the Snowman, a flying cardinal, a skiing snowman, a Times Square ball drop, and Iowa State basketball and football players.

1023 N.W. 32nd St.: Argo Christmas lights offers flashing red and white lights synchronized to music. The playlist alternates on odd and even days.

Prairie Ridge Church, 825 N.W. 36th St.: This synchronized light display sits in front of Prairie Ridge Church in Ankeny.

Uptown Ankeny, 601 SW Third St.: Discover 50-plus animated displays sponsored by local businesses in the six blocks surrounding Uptown Ankeny. Don't miss the 25-foot-tall show tree.

More:How to spend the perfect day in Prairie Trail in Ankeny with restaurants, bars and shopping

Altoona

Jolly Holiday Lights, 801 Bass Pro Drive N.W.: This holiday display at the Outlets of Des Moines benefits Make-A-Wish Foundation. Tickets start at $25.

More:Spend the perfect day in Des Moines' East Village with restaurants, bars and shopping

Des Moines

Ashby and Wallace Avenue just east and west of Beaver Avenue: More than 50 homes in this Beaverdale neighborhood decorate for the holiday. Look for a sign with a local radio station set to Christmas music to get in the holiday mood and ways to donate to Food Bank of Iowa.

Brook Run Drive: More than 50 homes in this east side neighborhood feature a themed tree. Visitors can enter through three entrances to see a synchronized light show on Springwood Lane, a tribute to Candy Land, and Santa’s Seaside Crossing.

4840 Beaver Ave.: Find a home decorated with lights and displays along Beaver Avenue.

Dogtown along University Avenue: The Dogtown Lights display takes over this Drake neighborhood.

First Church of the Open Bible, 2200 Beaver Ave.: A synchronized music and light display blinks at this church in Beaverdale. Tune into the radio station advertised on signs around the light display for music.

More:11 Christmas light displays to visit around Des Moines this holiday season

Grimes

1801 N.W. Morningside Drive: Flashing holiday lights set to music bring visitors to this home in Grimes.

Johnston

7234 N.W. 86th St.: This home features a long driveway that is lighted on both sides. The house and barn have light on roof, along with Santa, reindeer and sleigh.

More:Holiday shopping events to visit across Des Moines this fall include Jingle in the Junction

Urbandale

Living History Farms, 11121 Hickman Road: Find more than one mile of lights synchronized to music at Santa's Rock n Lights. Des Moines’ light experience with the largest variety of displays including color changing light technology, larger than life light sculptures and traditional lights. Prices start at $29.99 for a car with six people.

Charles Gabus Tree Memorial Park, 3600 86th St.: More than 50,000 lights are located at the Charles Gabus Tree Memorial Park next to the Urbandale Public Library for the Miracle on 86th in Urbandale.

More:15 holiday shows you'll want to see in Des Moines, from acrobatics to Irish dance

West Des Moines

3608 Ashworth Road: See more than 50,000 lights decorating this home on Ashworth Road in West Des Moines. Kids can drop off letters to Santa while adults can leave canned goods for donations.

1121 62nd St.: Tune into 89.5 FM and watch thousands of lights perform a bright and magical light show.

Lutheran Church of Hope, 925 Jordan Creek Pkwy.: This Lutheran church in West Des Moines has pretty blue lights surrounding it.

More:How to spend the perfect day in Valley Junction with restaurants, bars and shopping

Windsor Heights

Franklin Avenue, Marylynn Drive and 72nd Street south of Hickman Road, among others: More than 100 homes are decked out for the holidays, thanks to the annual lighting content sponsored by the Windsor Heights Foundation.

Susan Stapleton is the entertainment editor and dining reporter at The Des Moines Register. Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, or drop her a line at sstapleton@gannett.com.

UnityPoint hires Jon Rozenfeld as Des Moines market president

UnityPoint Health has announced the hire of a new market president in the Des Moines area.On Thursday, UnityPoint Health announced Jon Rozenfeld has been named as the Des Moines market president to oversee the health systems' hospitals, clinics and other facilities in the Des Moines area. He will start the job Jan. 8.Rozenfeld will take over the role from his predecessor David Stark, who had been serving as interim market president and will transition into a new position within UnityPoint Health, officials said....

UnityPoint Health has announced the hire of a new market president in the Des Moines area.

On Thursday, UnityPoint Health announced Jon Rozenfeld has been named as the Des Moines market president to oversee the health systems' hospitals, clinics and other facilities in the Des Moines area. He will start the job Jan. 8.

Rozenfeld will take over the role from his predecessor David Stark, who had been serving as interim market president and will transition into a new position within UnityPoint Health, officials said.

UnityPoint Health is one of the largest health care systems in the state, with 32 hospitals and 280 clinics in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. Its flagship hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, is in Des Moines.

“I am excited to begin this role at UnityPoint Health — Des Moines and make Des Moines my new home with my wife,” Rozenfeld said in a statement. “I wholeheartedly support UnityPoint Health’s mission and focus on creating a positive experience for every patient. I look forward to building upon the strong foundation that is already in place to provide great healthcare to this growing community. I’m also ready to partner with leadership, physicians, team members, donors and our community to advance healthcare for Central Iowa and beyond.”

Rozenfeld has 25 years of experience working in health care, having most recently served as the chief executive officer of Vista Health System in Waukegan, Illinois. His LinkedIn resume also indicates that he's held various leadership positions at other health systems across the Midwest, including SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, and AMITA Health, an Illinois-based physician group.

Rozenfeld received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a master of business administration from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

“As an organization, we are dedicated to providing quality healthcare for our community now and for decades to come,” John Schmidt, UnityPoint Health — Des Moines Board Chair, said in a statement. “We look forward to what our future holds under Jon’s leadership as we grow programs and services to meet the needs of our community and state, and we’re also grateful for David’s continued partnership in a new way on behalf of our entire health system.”

Stark, the former interim president of the Des Moines market, was appointed to Government, External Affairs and Philanthropy Executive for the UnityPoint Health system in July, and will formally transition into that role once Rozenfeld starts next month.

In that role, Stark will "focus on strategic legislative priorities, advocacy efforts, along with philanthropic and community impact initiatives" across the entire system, officials say.

Michaela Ramm covers health care for the Des Moines Register. She can be reached at mramm@registermedia.com, at (319) 339-7354 or on Twitter at @Michaela_Ramm

Axios investigates: Iowa's nursing home crisis

Sam and Leslie Wells planned ahead for years on how to obtain the best care for her in the final months of a terminal illness.Why it matters: The Wells' situation is one that many families around the state say they are contending with right now.Catch up fast: Leslie had ...

Sam and Leslie Wells planned ahead for years on how to obtain the best care for her in the final months of a terminal illness.

Why it matters: The Wells' situation is one that many families around the state say they are contending with right now.

Catch up fast: Leslie had leukodystrophy, a genetic disease that causes cognitive impairment, movement disorders and seizures.

Yes, but: Leslie stayed there just over a month before Sam says he had her transferred to Deerfield assisted living facility in Urbandale because of poor care, which he believes was due to staffing shortages.

Edgewater declined to comment on the allegations from the Wells' or other cases documented in inspection reports, citing privacy restrictions.

Zoom in: Sam's handwritten notes document three times within a month when he alleges Leslie soiled herself while waiting as long as 90 minutes for bathroom assistance at Edgewater's long-term care facility.

Of note: Edgewater's care plan did not address Leslie's falls.

Separately, Edgewater was fined after a resident was found in November 2019 outside without shoes for at least 20 minutes just before 5am.

Zoom out: Iowa does not require minimum staffing ratios in nursing homes. Its rules instead focus on whether facilities meet resident needs.

State of play: Sam and his family now advocate for nursing home reforms.

Nursing home closures accelerate from pandemic

Since 2020, Iowa has experienced a sharp increase in nursing home closures statewide.

Why it matters: The closures are primarily due to a lack of available workforce to help keep facilities afloat, Brent Willett, president of Iowa Health Care Association previously said.

By the numbers: In 2021, one nursing facility closed in western Iowa.

The big picture: 13% of the nation's total nursing home closures in 2022 occurred in Iowa, Radio Iowa reports.

Staffing shortfalls projected for years to come

Nearly 42% of Iowa's nursing homes have self-reported staffing shortages, according to data published earlier this year by the AARP.

Why it matters: It's a national problem that is expected to persist for years, according to a report in August from the American Health Care Association (AHCA).

Zoom in: Iowa's nursing home staff shortages were ranked as the 11th-worst in the U.S. by the AARP.

What they're saying: The average hourly rate for Iowa nursing home workers is around $16, which is lower than the rate in many other industries and makes it difficult to find or retain staff, Brad Anderson, president of AARP Iowa, tells Axios.

The big picture: The AHCA says the nursing home industry lost 250,000 employees, or about 15% of its workforce, during the pandemic.

Nursing home complaints double between 2019 and 2022

Iowa's "immediate jeopardy" nursing home complaints more than doubled — from 39 to 83 — between 2019 and 2022, according to data from the Iowa Department of Inspections, Appeals and Licensing.

Why it matters: They're among the most serious level of complaints — situations where a provider's noncompliance resulted in serious injury or death, or could have done so.

Zoom in: There were 410 total complaints pending against Iowa nursing homes that were at least 30 days old in June 2022, according to Iowa Capital Dispatch.

State of play: The inspections department reduced the number of pending complaints to 161, a more than 60% reduction between June and August of this year.

The big picture: Multiple states have bigger complaint or facility inspection backlogs than Iowa, according to a review of federal data published in February by Newsweek.

Iowa nursing homes were fined more than 1,000 times in three years

Iowa nursing homes were fined or denied payment as a penalty more than 1,000 times in the last three years, according to data published in September from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

State of play: The fines resulted in more than $12.7 million in penalties, the 14th highest state total in the country.

Zoom in: Two Iowa nursing homes are listed as Special Focus Facilities (SFF) and are operating under additional scrutiny by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) because of a history of serious quality issues — Arbor Court of Mount Pleasant and Aspire of Primghar.

Meanwhile, 10 others are SFF candidates, including one cited for violations tied to four resident deaths, Iowa Capital Dispatch reports.

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