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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Lakeville, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Lakeville, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Lakeville, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Lakeville, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Lakeville, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Lakeville, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Lakeville, MN

When Is Santa Claus Coming To Lakeville?

Find out when and where to see Jolly Old St. Nick this holiday season.Get ready, because Santa Claus is coming to Lakeville! This holiday season, the man in red is spreading holiday joy all over town. So get those wishlists ready, be on your best behavior (Santa knows if you've been bad or good!) and mark your calendar. Here's when and where you can catch Santa in the Lakeville area this year!Please note: Event dates are subject to change or cancellation. We recommend calling ahead to confirm and making reservations when poss...

Find out when and where to see Jolly Old St. Nick this holiday season.

Get ready, because Santa Claus is coming to Lakeville! This holiday season, the man in red is spreading holiday joy all over town. So get those wishlists ready, be on your best behavior (Santa knows if you've been bad or good!) and mark your calendar. Here's when and where you can catch Santa in the Lakeville area this year!

Please note: Event dates are subject to change or cancellation. We recommend calling ahead to confirm and making reservations when possible.

When: Saturday, Dec. 2

Where: Rosemount Community Center Banquet Hall, 13885 S. Robert Trail, Rosemount, MN 55068

What: Less than 20 minutes away from Lakeville, Mr. and Mrs. Claus are spreading joy at Breakfast with Santa. Attendees can enjoy a delightful continental-style breakfast featuring muffins, donuts, fruit, yogurt, juice, hot cocoa and coffee while the kids engage in holiday crafts. Capture cherished moments with Santa and Mrs. Claus through photo opportunities facilitated by the attentive staff. Tickets are $5 per person and include a morning filled with festive breakfast, crafts and the chance to meet the beloved holiday duo! Click here for more info.

Find out what's happening in Lakevillewith free, real-time updates from Patch.

When: Saturday, Dec. 2Where: Historic Downtown Lakeville, Holyoke Avenue, Lakeville, MN 55044What: Experience the magic of the season at Holiday on Main! Join Historic Downtown Lakeville and the Arts Center on Holyoke Avenue for a day filled with crafts, entertainment, music, sleigh rides and the beloved appearance of Santa Claus. Embrace the festive spirit, relive the joy of childhood and create heartwarming memories as Santa Claus spreads cheer during this free-to-the-public event. Don't miss the chance to be part of this unique celebration that captures the essence of the holidays! Click here for more info.

When: Saturday, Dec. 2Where: Lakeville Heritage Center, 20110 Holyoke Avenue, Lakeville, MN 55044What: Experience the joy of giving at Santa's Secret Store, designed for kids to enjoy hassle-free holiday shopping! Priced between $1 to $15, a variety of wonderful gifts will be available for children to purchase for their family and friends. Parents and kids collaborate on a shopping list, then embark on a fun shopping adventure. Gifts are wrapped on-site, ready to be kept secret until the holidays, creating heartwarming surprises for loved ones. No registration is required — just join your fellow neighbors for this delightful holiday shopping experience, ensuring cheerful smiles and festive anticipation for the season ahead! Click here for more info.

When: Saturday, Dec. 2 - Sunday, Dec. 3Where: Twin Cities Premium Outlets, 3965 Eagan Outlets Parkway, Eagan, MN 55122What: Capture the magic of the holidays with free photos alongside Santa and live reindeer in a winter wonderland just a short drive from Lakeville! Visit for a festive experience filled with cherished moments, warm beverages, complimentary candy canes and the opportunity to check off your gift list with retailers. The event will be outside in Center Court, near Market Hall, for a joyful celebration perfect for the whole family. Click here for more info.

Happy holidays, Lakeville! Wishing you a joyful season filled with warmth and happiness.

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What's behind Lakeville's restaurant and bar boom

Before he opened Lakeville Brewing Company in 2016, Don Seiler and his wife spent many weekends driving 30 miles to the Twin Cities for a craft beer.Today, he has no shortage of options — and competition — in the suburb's downtown corridor.Driving the news: At least eight additional dining, drinking, or entertainment spots have opened in an area spanning several blocks since Seiler and his partners hatched plans to open the brewpub in a former VFW in the heart of historic downtown....

Before he opened Lakeville Brewing Company in 2016, Don Seiler and his wife spent many weekends driving 30 miles to the Twin Cities for a craft beer.

Today, he has no shortage of options — and competition — in the suburb's downtown corridor.

Driving the news: At least eight additional dining, drinking, or entertainment spots have opened in an area spanning several blocks since Seiler and his partners hatched plans to open the brewpub in a former VFW in the heart of historic downtown.

Why it matters: A booming dining and entertainment scene gives families flocking to one of Minnesota's fastest-growing cities -- which is projected to hit 83,500 by 2040 -- things to do there.

Plus: City leaders say the transformation of the city's traditional "Main Street" of Holyoke Ave. gives Lakeville an edge over neighboring suburbs in attracting residents, workers, and visitors.

How it happened: A half dozen local business owners and city officials told Axios that the debut of Lakeville and Angry Inch Brewing seven years ago had a snowball effect.

Seiler, whose initial pitch was based on a "gut marketing feeling" that if his family wanted more local haunts, others did, too, said that was by design.

What they're saying: Some other local restaurateurs agree with that "the more the merrier" outlook.

Between the lines: The growth wasn't all organic. Several owners credited the city's willingness to work with businesses — Lakeville didn't even allow breweries before 2016, and it added another licensing option to accommodate liquor sales at a curling club.

Of note: While Lakeville doesn't collect a local sales tax, boosters say the economic development has generated cash for the city's coffers by increasing property values downtown.

What we're hearing: Mayor Luke Hellier told Axios there's been a "big surge" in businesses reaching out for space in recent weeks.

What we're watching: Lakeville will need to look for ways to increase space — and parking for patrons — as demand grows.

Taken the tree down yet? Lakeville recycling plant seeks your holiday decor

LAKEVILLE, Minn. — Have you taken down the Christmas tree yet? If not, a local recycling plant is looking for your help."We buy all sorts of different grades of coppers, brasses, aluminum, stainless steel," CW Metals Account Executive Dan Walsh said.CW Metals specializes in recycling all things metal, but this year, they're also accepting donations in holiday décor."Copper is an incredibly in-demand material,&...

LAKEVILLE, Minn. — Have you taken down the Christmas tree yet? If not, a local recycling plant is looking for your help.

"We buy all sorts of different grades of coppers, brasses, aluminum, stainless steel," CW Metals Account Executive Dan Walsh said.

CW Metals specializes in recycling all things metal, but this year, they're also accepting donations in holiday décor.

"Copper is an incredibly in-demand material," Walsh said.

The company is asking anyone to donate new, used or broken holiday lights in order to fight hunger.

"They're very recyclable and, let's be honest, they don't work all of the time," Walsh said.

The lights will find new life, but will help support life too.

"Any light that goes into your trash bin will end up in a landfill, most likely to never be recovered again," Walsh said.

All donation proceeds will go towards The Open Door, a local non-profit working to end hunger. In its first year of the Holiday Lights For Hunger campaign, Walsh hopes to generate $10,000.

"We feel like it will be very impactful going forward," Walsh said. "Realistically, the sky is the limit."

The Open Door executive director Jason Viana agrees. He says that money will fun two weeks worth of food purchases.

"That's gonna helps thousands of families and help us do a job, hopefully providing something that we don't always have access to," he said.

It's an impact that stresses far beyond the landfill.

"Our organization last year rescued almost 1.5 million pounds of food that would have gone to the landfill. And we were able to preserve what was available and get it directly in the hands of folks that needed it," Viana said. "So, when you think about a natural connection, recycling Christmas lights, and being able to extend the life of food, it's a natural fit of a partnership."

There are a total of 15 collection sites, including CW Metals two locations in Lakeville and Monticello. For a full list of locations, click here.

Beret Leone

Beret Leone is a native Minnesotan who joined the WCCO team as a reporter in September 2022 - and she's thrilled be back home in the Twin Cities! Beret grew up in Chaska and graduated from Bethel University.

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Post office proposed for Lakeville-Farmington border to address mail delays

LAKEVILLE, Minn. -- Two cities in the south metro hope that they can create a combined post office to help with sluggish mail service that has been plaguing the area for over a year.In a letter to United States Postal Service Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, Rep. Angie Craig proposed opening a new post office near the border of Lakeville and Farmington to address issues regarding capacity, storage and delivery facing the two cities.According to the Minnesota Census Bureau, Lakeville experienced a growth rate of ...

LAKEVILLE, Minn. -- Two cities in the south metro hope that they can create a combined post office to help with sluggish mail service that has been plaguing the area for over a year.

In a letter to United States Postal Service Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, Rep. Angie Craig proposed opening a new post office near the border of Lakeville and Farmington to address issues regarding capacity, storage and delivery facing the two cities.

According to the Minnesota Census Bureau, Lakeville experienced a growth rate of 3.8% between July 2020 to July 2021 and is the fastest growing city in Minnesota. Lakeville's population is only continuing to grow — the city's population is expected to reach 85,000 soon.

RELATED: What's behind the mail delivery delays in the Twin Cities?

Despite the suburb's growing population, Lakeville only has one post office.

Additionally, the City of Farmington has expressed interest in relocating its post office to accommodate the growth and safety of a nearby school.

"Opening a local office near the border of Lakeville and Farmington would allow for improvements to be made in the efficiency of mail sorting and delivery while solving problems for each of the cities as they continue to grow," Craig said in the letter.

Farmington Mayor Joshua Hoyt says collaborating with Lakeville and USPS to combine facilities would help better serve residents for both communities.

"A new post office will facilitate smoother mail and package deliveries and contribute to our community's growth and convenience. We wholeheartedly welcome Congresswoman Craig's efforts and look forward to working together to make this project a reality," Lakeville Mayor Luke Hellier said.

Staffing shortages have also contributed to slow mail service in the area. In July, USPS officials said that workers are often working 50-70 hours six days a week due to shortages.

Riley Moser

Riley Fletcher Moser is a digital line producer at wcco.com. At WCCO, she often covers breaking news and feature stories. In 2022, Riley received an honorable mention in sports writing from the Iowa College Media Association.

Lakeville Fly-In Breakfast draws thousands with food, planes

LAKEVILLE, Minn. – Thousands of hungry plane enthusiasts took their breakfast plans to Lakeville's Airlake Airport Sunday, in hopes of getting a close-up look at history.The event, which this year kicks off the city's annual Pan-O-Prog celebration, serves as a benefit to the Lakeville Lions Club. In its 11th year, this year's fly-in commemorated its first year in a new hangar on the airport's south side. With the new space came the chance to feed even more people."You can't find it in a book how to s...

LAKEVILLE, Minn. – Thousands of hungry plane enthusiasts took their breakfast plans to Lakeville's Airlake Airport Sunday, in hopes of getting a close-up look at history.

The event, which this year kicks off the city's annual Pan-O-Prog celebration, serves as a benefit to the Lakeville Lions Club. In its 11th year, this year's fly-in commemorated its first year in a new hangar on the airport's south side. With the new space came the chance to feed even more people.

"You can't find it in a book how to serve 2,500 people remotely in an airport hangar," said Paul Jacobus of Lakeville Lions. "It's over 3,800 sausage links. Four hundred pounds of pancake mix. Four hundred pounds of liquid eggs, and dozens and dozens and dozens of donuts."

MORE NEWS: Plane makes emergency landing on Blaine road

Sunday's celebration filled the hangar to its limits.

"I think we just want to watch the planes, see how close we can get to them," said Josh Tice of Farmington, who came to the event with his two sons and their grandfather.

Sunday's breakfast boasted planes from World War Two, including a traveling exhibit highlighting the lives and legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen.

"It's amazing," said Rick Doaust of Lakeville. "Seeing how big they were, I just love the roar of their engine. Completely different from our modern-day planes."

While Sunday's breakfast ended just before lunchtime, the Red Tail exhibit will remain open for free until Monday at 3 p.m.

"It's a way to make sure that these folks are never forgotten and the barriers that they broke down to be part of the military," Jacobus said. "As time goes on, this exhibit is designed to make sure people learn about the experience they went through – that they too themselves can rise above and overcome any challenges that come their way."

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