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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Lincoln, NE?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Lincoln, NE

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Lincoln, NE, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Lincoln, NE

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Lincoln, NE?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Lincoln, NE

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Lincoln, NE

Nebraska volleyball defeats Arkansas 3-1 in Elite Eight match: Match recap

Hello from the Devaney Sports Center! Nebraska volleyball is set to play Arkansas with a Final Four berth on the line.The No. 1 Huskers (33-1) and No. 9 Razorbacks (28-5) will begin at 5 p.m.Follow updates from the match, and refresh for the latest dispatches from the action.Live updates7:25 p.m. Nebraska wins match point on a service error by Arkansas, taking the match 3-1 by set scores of 26-24, 25-14, 21-25, 25-23. The Razorbacks had cut the deficit to 24-23 before the serve went way long and...

Hello from the Devaney Sports Center! Nebraska volleyball is set to play Arkansas with a Final Four berth on the line.

The No. 1 Huskers (33-1) and No. 9 Razorbacks (28-5) will begin at 5 p.m.

Follow updates from the match, and refresh for the latest dispatches from the action.

Live updates

7:25 p.m. Nebraska wins match point on a service error by Arkansas, taking the match 3-1 by set scores of 26-24, 25-14, 21-25, 25-23. The Razorbacks had cut the deficit to 24-23 before the serve went way long and out of bounds.

NU finishes the match hitting .194 to Arkansas' .100. Merritt Beason leads the way with 19 kills and added eight blocks with 11 digs. Harper Murray tallies 15 kills and 12 digs. Bekka Allick was a wall for the Husker defense, accounting for 12 blocks in the match.

As a team, NU had 57 kills, 78 digs, 17 blocks and just one service ace.

Nebraska moves on to the NCAA Tournament semifinals, facing off with Pittsburgh on Thursday.

7:18 p.m. Nebraska quickly retakes the lead in the fourth at 21-20. A challenge by John Cook reversed a would-be Arkansas 20-18 lead to a 19-19 tie. NU serving out of the Razorback timeout.

7:12 p.m. Another 3-0 run by the Razorbacks and they lead the fourth set 19-17. Arkansas now has eight service aces in the match.

7:06 p.m. Arkansas goes on a 3-0 run of its own and NU calls a timeout. The Huskers still lead 14-13.

6:59 p.m. Nebraska leads 13-8 in the fourth set, forcing an Arkansas timeout. The Huskers are on a 4-0 run after a Reilly kill and combo block from Reilly and Allick.

6:44 p.m. Arkansas gets one back against the Huskers, forcing a fourth set with a 25-21 win in set three. The Razorbacks' attack saw a significant boost and now sit at .138 for the match.

That's the first set that Nebraska has lost in the NCAA Tournament.

6:36 p.m. Nebraska cuts into the deficit and trail 19-18 as Arkansas takes a timeout.

6:32 p.m. Arkansas goes on a 4-0 run out of the break and forces an NU timeout. The Razorbacks lead 18-15 after a timely service ace and a Husker error.

6:28 p.m. Nebraska leads the third set 15-14 at the media timeout. Beason is powering the Huskers with 13 kills and Batenhorst has eight. Allick is up to eight blocks in the match.

6:07 p.m. Nebraska dominates the second set with a 25-14 win to go up 2-0. Allick and Bergen Reilly team up for a block on the match point.

The Huskers are hitting .253 (31 kills on 79 attacks), while Arkansas has seen a steep drop in production at .094 for the match. NU never trailed in the set and it was tied just once at 1-1.

Beason is up to 10 kills and five blocks, Jackson has seven kills and Allick has seven blocks. Lexi Rodriguez and Reilly each have 10 digs so far.

6:00 p.m. The second set has been all Nebraska with the lead up to 17-10. Beason has eight kills in the match to go with Batenhorst's six, while Jackson and Murray have five apiece. NU is hitting at .232 on 26 kills, Allick has six blocks and Beason has chipped in five.

5:47 p.m. The Huskers are finding their groove now, leading 8-2 in the second set. Arkansas challenged a call early in the set, but it went NU's way. Four different Huskers with a kill in the set so far, including Ally Batenhorst and Andi Jackson. Batenhorst has five kills and Allick is up to five blocks in the match.

5:35 p.m. Nebraska completes the furious comeback to win the first set 26-24 over Arkansas. The Huskers finished the set on a 10-3 run.

Merritt Beason and Murray lead the Huskers with four kills each, and NU is up to .194 hitting. Allick has four blocks, along with Beason's three.

The Razorbacks' attack started out hot, but waned deeper into the set. 17 kills with 10 errors, good for .156 hitting.

5:30 p.m. Well, that was quick. NU goes on a 4-0 run to cut the deficit to 21-20 in the first set. Allick up to three blocks now, Harper Murray with four kills and a couple timely errors from the Razorbacks.

5:26 p.m. The Razorbacks increase their lead to 21-16, forcing an NU timeout. The Huskers are hitting just .100 to Arkansas' .265. Jillian Gillen leading the way with six kills.

5:16 p.m. Now Arkansas calls a timeout as NU starts a first-set rally. Razorbacks' lead down to 12-10 thanks to two big blocks by Bekka Allick.

5:10 p.m. Nebraska timeout in the first set. The visiting Razorbacks lead 9-5 early on .417 hitting and six kills. The Huskers opened with an ace and have been on their heels since.

5 p.m. Notable attendees at tonight's match: Matt Rhule, Trev Alberts, Baylor Scheierman, Heinrich Haarberg, Josiah Allick.

4:55 p.m. The game will start on ESPN News and ESPN+ because the Louisville vs. Pittsburgh game is still playing. The Huskers will be on ESPNU (Channel 370 on Spectrum; 29 on Allo) when the Louisville game is over.

ESPN News channel on Spectrum is 302.

Haymarket Winter Market on tap for Saturday in Lincoln

Alicia Reisinger's affinity for winter markets is completely personal. Her husband, John, popped the question to her one year at the one in Chicago.A few years later, while stranded in Frankfurt, Germany, she and John's love for the Christmas markets was rekindled."We loved it, and the draw is just such a cool thing," she said, marveling at how the markets become part of the holiday tradition for so many people. "We just started researching why they did it."There's something romantic about it all, she...

Alicia Reisinger's affinity for winter markets is completely personal. Her husband, John, popped the question to her one year at the one in Chicago.

A few years later, while stranded in Frankfurt, Germany, she and John's love for the Christmas markets was rekindled.

"We loved it, and the draw is just such a cool thing," she said, marveling at how the markets become part of the holiday tradition for so many people. "We just started researching why they did it."

There's something romantic about it all, she said. Carolers singing. Holiday lights glistening. And perhaps a light snow falling as the town folk — clothed in their heavy coats, mittens and earmuffs — walk the streets, sipping hot cider and stopping to check out the wares of countless vendors.

"You're kind of like in a snow globe," said Reisinger, founder of Wax Buffalo Candle Co., who last year brought a winter market to the Historic Haymarket district that she hopes becomes a Lincoln tradition.

The second installment of the Haymarket Winter Market takes place Saturday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m., below the viaduct on O Street. Eighth Street will be closed between N and P streets to accommodate more than 125 small businesses that will have booths.

Admission is $12 and can be purchased in advance. The Winter Market will also feature a children's area and something for everyone, Reisinger said.

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"We're very passionate about bringing something to the community that we believe is popular," she said. "They loved it last year. The attendance way exceeded our expectations."

An estimated 4,000 people attended the event, and with a year to plan and market it, Reisinger expects even bigger numbers on Saturday.

"Our focus remains firmly on local makers and downtown businesses," she said. "We've already gathered vendors eager to showcase the incredible talent and local brands that call Nebraska home."

It doesn't hurt that the Haymarket Winter Market is right in the middle of Haymarket Unwrapped, a three-day shopping event that Downtown Lincoln Association CEO and Executive Director Todd Ogden compares to the Haymarket's version of Shop the Block.

"We created a separate event for the Haymarket because it's more like destination shopping," Ogden said. "People can park and walk around to all the unique kinds of gifty-type shops."

Haymarket Unwrapped runs through Sunday. The Haymarket Winter Market was originally slated for Sunday, but the Nebraska-Creighton basketball game figures to bring additional traffic to the Haymarket, which prompted Reisinger to move it to Saturday.

No matter which day of the weekend the event is held, the goal is to build something that will last for years to come.

"It just felt like something Lincoln needed," said Brianne Bayer, Wax Buffalo's brand director. "Like a movie festival where people could come together each year, we wanted to create a place that like felt like a new tradition."

Family remembers Lincoln man, Pat Egan, 81, a born salesman and a true firecracker

Try as you might, Pat Egan will never be replicated, his family says.The man sold everything. Insurance and imports. Christmas trees and newspapers. Seeds and stilts. He also promoted concerts at Pershing Auditorium.But he's best known for the Crazy Cracker fireworks he began selling as a boy that would become his legacy."He was a born entrepreneur," s...

Try as you might, Pat Egan will never be replicated, his family says.

The man sold everything. Insurance and imports. Christmas trees and newspapers. Seeds and stilts. He also promoted concerts at Pershing Auditorium.

But he's best known for the Crazy Cracker fireworks he began selling as a boy that would become his legacy.

"He was a born entrepreneur," said Betsy Egan, his wife of the last 35 years. "We'd go to trade shows and he got along with everyone. That was the beauty of him.

"He was like Switzerland."

Pat Egan, 81, died Nov. 22 in Lincoln, where he and Betsy spent half the year. The other half was spent at their home in Key Colony Beach, Florida.

In Lincoln, where he grew up, Egan's entrepreneurial spirit kicked in from the start. His mother, Julia, had him selling seeds door to door at the age of 6.

It wasn't long after that that his grandmother Clara, who lived on F Street, would gather the tomatoes she grew and have the young boy bring them down to the local grocery store.

"She'd tell him to make a deal with that grocer," said Erin Egan, Pat's daughter. "She'd tell him to try to get the best meats or soup bones he could get. I think she taught him a little bit about how to barter trade."

In the summer of 1957, attending high school at the now-closed University High School, Egan delivered groceries for Leon's Gourmet Grocer, 2200 Winthrop Road. He was approached by a customer named Duffy Helmsdorfer, who asked him how much he made an hour.

At the time, Pat Egan made about 35 cents an hour. Helmsdorfer told him he could make $100 a week by just sitting on a corner.

A 2014 Journal Star story about Egan illustrated how Helmsdorfer, the state’s fireworks kingpin, gave the teenager fireworks on consignment and some red, white and blue bunting for the card table he set up at 26th and Holdrege streets.

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It was that summer that one of Nebraska’s longest-lived fireworks businesses – Crazy Cracker — was borne.

Neighborhood kids came with pennies and dimes and left with pockets full of firecrackers and bottle rockets, the story said.

Five decades later, Egan was still selling fireworks — this time by the semitrailer load. The tents that were up around Lincoln and Omaha — including one run by Erin — were not nearly as prevalent as they were in their heyday of the 1980s, but longtime residents still looked for his product each Fourth of July.

"He enjoyed meeting different people," Erin Egan said. "He treated everyone with respect. It didn't matter if you were poor, rich or whatever. To him, everybody was the same. Everybody had something to offer. ... He liked everybody."

The fireworks business never waned even when he entered into the insurance industry. In fact, during his 45-year career of operating an independent insurance business, he always closed the office in July to sell his fireworks.

Meanwhile, he took trips to China to find goods he could sell in Lincoln — from baskets to furniture — and then began selling Christmas trees at East Park Plaza.

His daughter remembers the year that he boosted business by bringing a herd of reindeer to the parking lot and having his brother dress as Santa Claus at the Christmas tree lot.

"I thought it was awesome," said Erin Egan, who was attending Pius X High School at the time.

It was quintessential Pat Egan, his wife said.

"That was Pat," Betsy Egan said. "He made everything fun. He didn't have hobbies. He didn't need any because he had so much fun at work."

And somehow, he also found time to dabble in promoting events and concerts, too. For years, he put on the Boat, Sport & Travel Show at the Lancaster Event Center.

He also helped bring musical acts to Pershing Auditorium, his daughter said.

"I think he really loved doing that," she said. "He loved putting on concerts."

Pillen announces new prison to be built in Lincoln

Listen To This StoryNebraska will build a new, 1,512-bed prison to replace the Nebraska State Penitentiary on a site in Lincoln, Gov. Jim Pillen announced Thursday.In a news conference, Pillen described the considerations that went into deciding where to build.“The location…is based on the need of having tremendous access to Interstate 80 and access to all of the workforce and (prisoners’) families. And so the decision was made to exercise an option on a piece of property in northeast Lincoln that&rs...

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Nebraska will build a new, 1,512-bed prison to replace the Nebraska State Penitentiary on a site in Lincoln, Gov. Jim Pillen announced Thursday.

In a news conference, Pillen described the considerations that went into deciding where to build.

“The location…is based on the need of having tremendous access to Interstate 80 and access to all of the workforce and (prisoners’) families. And so the decision was made to exercise an option on a piece of property in northeast Lincoln that’s near 112th and Adams Street.

That piece of property consists of 305 acres, and will cost $17 million, Pillen said.

In a statement issued after the announcement, T.J. McDowell Jr., Chief of Staff for Lincoln Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird, said “The new prison is a state-led project, and the city does not choose the location. We understand the project is in the design phase and anticipate future conversations about the needs of their project.”

Construction on the estimated $350 million facility will begin in the fall of 2024. No completion date has yet been set.

Corrections Director Rob Jeffreys said the new prison will offer enough space for rehabilitative programs to increase chances inmates will succeed once they’re released. Pillen said 60 percent of inmates are released within three years.

Building a new prison has been a source of controversy for years. Opponents argue the prison system will remain overcrowded if sentencing practices are not reformed. Pillen said he has no plans to propose such reforms, saying prisoners need to face the consequences of their behavior.

State Sen. Terrell McKinney, a leading opponent of building a new prison, called it a "new plantation," and predicted the Penitentiary would remain open with adjusted capacity. However, Jeffreys said no prisoners would be housed there, saying that while some of the buildings were new, the underlying infrastructure is old.

Nebraska’s prisons are among the nation’s most overcrowed. Last year the system as a whole held an average daily population of 5,516 inmates, about 1,800 more than its design capacity of 3,675.

The Penitentiary itself averaged 1,319, compared to its design capacity of 818. But Thursday, Jeffreys said the Pen currently holds about 1,200, so a new, 1,512-bed facility would reduce overall overcrowding by about 300 people.

Northeast Lincoln site chosen for new, $366 million state prison

New facility would replace aging State Penitentiary and use workers already at that Lincoln prisonLINCOLN — A site in northeast Lincoln was announced Thursday as the location for a new, $366 million state prison, with state officials pledging it would a nation-leading facility for inmates and workers.Gov. Jim Pillen, along with recently appointed State Corrections Director Rob Jeffreys, cited the location’s proximity to workforce and inmate families for being chosen. Interstate 80 is also close by, they said, easi...

New facility would replace aging State Penitentiary and use workers already at that Lincoln prison

LINCOLN — A site in northeast Lincoln was announced Thursday as the location for a new, $366 million state prison, with state officials pledging it would a nation-leading facility for inmates and workers.

Gov. Jim Pillen, along with recently appointed State Corrections Director Rob Jeffreys, cited the location’s proximity to workforce and inmate families for being chosen. Interstate 80 is also close by, they said, easing visits by family and commutes for workers.

The 1,500-bed facility will replace the aging State Penitentiary in southwest Lincoln, which has a capacity of about 1,200 inmates but has been plagued by water main breaks, including another minor one Thursday morning.

Building the prison in Lincoln, they said, will allow the current 500 workers at the State Pen to be transferred to the new prison.

Pillen and Jeffreys also said a new prison would be better designed to provide rehabilitation programming for inmates.

“This investment will allow us to literally lead the nation in taking care of those who have a debt to pay to society,” Pillen said at a press conference.

This spring, the Nebraska Legislature voted to approve the final $95.8 million to complete funding for a new prison. The 305-acre site cost $17 million, Jeffreys said, and the prison will cost $32 million a year to staff.

He said inflation will probably increase the construction costs from the most recent estimate of $366 million — an expense that likely sets a record for construction of a single state facility. Jeffreys said the State Penitentiary, which has portions that date back to before Nebraska became a state in 1867, would be decommissioned when the new prison opens.

Officials on Thursday did not have a date for completion of the new facility, though they said construction is expected to begin in about a year.

Nebraska’s prison system, like other employers across the nation, is struggling with workforce issues, but Jeffreys said that he is placing a greater emphasis on wellness and engagement to retain workers.

Turnover of workers reduced

Recent pay increases for security staff appear to be making an impact. Turnover in 2022 was 16%, according to a corrections spokeswoman, and is projected to be 17% this year. Only a couple of years ago, turnover was topping 25%.

Still, two state prisons, the Reception and Treatment Center in Lincoln and the Tecumseh State Prison, remain under staffing emergencies, requiring 12-hour shifts to fill posts and some restrictions on activities and out-of-cell time for inmates.

About 80 workers are bused from Omaha each day to fill positions at the rural prison in Tecumseh. As of Aug. 2, corrections had 367 vacant positions, up from 333 in February.

A site somewhere in the Omaha and Lincoln area, or between them, had been sought by the state to provide adequate workforce, but some communities had expressed no interest in hosting a prison. Jeffreys said 70 sites had initially been considered.

A statement from T.J. McDowell, the chief of staff for Lincoln Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird, was guarded in its reaction to site selection.

“The new prison is a state-led project, and the city does not choose the location,” McDowell said. “We understand the project is in the design phase and anticipate future conversations about the needs of their project.”

‘Waste of time’

Others were not pleased with the selection.

Omaha Sen. Terrell McKinney, who has advocated for less expensive and more effective alternatives to incarceration, said it was obvious that state officials didn’t consult with community members who are seeking alternatives.

He said he was also saddened to hear Pillen, during Thursday’s press conference, say he didn’t favor adopting sentencing reforms to stem the flow of new inmates into the prison system.

A bill passed by the Legislature this spring called for creation of a task force to look at sentencing reforms to send fewer people to prison.

But, McKinney said, “If we’re just getting together to waste everyone’s time, it’s just not worth it.”

Nebraska has one of the most overcrowded prison systems in the country, holding about 1,600 more inmates that its design capacity, according to figures from the first quarter of 2023.

A consultant’s report has projected that Nebraska will need an additional 1,500 prison beds by 2030.

The new prison has not been touted as a solution for the overcrowding, though Jeffreys said Thursday that since it will be 300 beds larger than the State Pen, it should provide some help.

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