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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Minneapolis, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Minneapolis, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Minneapolis, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Minneapolis, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Minneapolis, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Minneapolis, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Minneapolis, MN

Troubled north Minneapolis liquor store’s license transferred to We Push for Peace founder

This is a modal window.No compatible source was found for this media.This is a modal window.This video is currently unavailable.Troubled north Minneapolis liquor store’s license transferred to We Push for Peace founderAn ongoing debate about the future of a troubled north Minneapolis liquor store has taken a new turn.The city council voted to transfer the Merwin Liquors liquor license to We Push for Peace founder Trahern Pollard.For the last few years, We Push for Peace has been on the...

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Troubled north Minneapolis liquor store’s license transferred to We Push for Peace founder

An ongoing debate about the future of a troubled north Minneapolis liquor store has taken a new turn.

The city council voted to transfer the Merwin Liquors liquor license to We Push for Peace founder Trahern Pollard.

For the last few years, We Push for Peace has been on the ground on West Broadway and Lyndale to try and turn it around.

“That’s what I’m trying to do with some of the young folks that we work with on a day-to-day basis like don’t forget the trauma, but let’s try to figure out a way to turn that trauma into your power,” Pollard said. “This is what I love to do.”

Last February, they opened up a community resource center right inside the Merwin Liquors building, and city data shows gun crimes decreased.

He calls acquiring the liquor license phase two of his plan to change the trajectory of the corner.

After a Thursday Minneapolis city council meeting, the majority of members voted to grant Pollard the liquor license to Merwin Liquors. Two members voted against it.

“Now that I’m going to own the business and then I’ll own the property. Then, I can reimagine it,” Pollard said.

This idea came with a lot of pushback.

Sanctuary Covenant Church is right next door to the liquor store. They started a petition in September 2023 to stop the transfer of the liquor license citing issues of trauma and addiction in the area.

“I would say that the church, as well as me, feel very consistent. We don’t believe the liquor store should be there,” Jesse Ross, Sanctuary Covenant Church representative, said.

Ross explained he wants north Minneapolis to have something different like a community area, a driver’s license education center or an area for entrepreneurs to sell products.

“Anything for the people. Anything that is not leading to death and destruction,” Ross said.

Pollard said the future of the building does not include a liquor store.

“Is the liquor store going to be there in my reimaging plan? Absolutely not and I say that with great conviction.” Pollard said.

Pollard said now the next goal is to own Merwin Liquors. He has a meeting in the coming weeks with the store to work out some of those details.

Minneapolis City Council member Jeremiah Ellison, representing Ward 5, released a statement about the pushback from the vote saying in part, “Many on the Northside have been under the impression that the City Council gets to decide whether Merwin’s Liquor exists or not. Some have asserted that this is the case — often with passion and good intentions. But this is not true. The vote at the City Council meeting today was about who may hold the license… there was never any lawful path to remove the license entirely.”

Ellison added, “I hope you all can respect and accept that the new liquor license to TXT has emerged as the best possible option under the authority I have.”

The 5 best things our food writers ate in the Twin Cities area this week

The Minnesotan Burger at Pauly's Pub & GrillHow we define Minnesota Nice is personal. For some, it's our unabashed friendliness — like the willingness to jump-start a car anywhere day or night. Others use it as a brushoff for a place where people think we all sound like we're in an episode of "Fargo." The third is a contrast between the two: The assertion that we'll give you directions to anywhere but our homes. Or that we'll shower you with praise while reserving a snappier opinion for a turned back. This burger...

The Minnesotan Burger at Pauly's Pub & Grill

How we define Minnesota Nice is personal. For some, it's our unabashed friendliness — like the willingness to jump-start a car anywhere day or night. Others use it as a brushoff for a place where people think we all sound like we're in an episode of "Fargo." The third is a contrast between the two: The assertion that we'll give you directions to anywhere but our homes. Or that we'll shower you with praise while reserving a snappier opinion for a turned back. This burger? It's the last one.

Pauly's Pub & Grill opened late last year in the former Kalsada, which was Augustine's before that. When Jim Flaherty and Joe Kasel took over the spot, they hung neon beer signs, added TVs, built a menu stacked with bar favorites and switched on the lights. The neighborhood quickly embraced the change. Driving by the space at night, the lights are always glowing, TVs tuned to a game, golf or bass fishing, and the dining room well-populated with folks who had been missing a neighborhood bar.

Burgers dominate the menu, and the cooks know what they're doing. The Minnesotan Burger ($15) comes on sweet and leaves sassy. Two beef patties are topped with roasted jalapeños and pepper jack cheese with a drizzling of Sriracha honey. The first bite is beefy with a bit of golden sweetness, quickly followed by a mellow slow burn. It's the kind of heat that promises to eventually build into a serious burn. A thick slice of bacon adds another layer of flavor with a satisfying smokiness. The entire bite is a juicy carnivorous taste of Midwestern kickiness. (Joy Summers)

Pot roast poutine at Maverick's Wood Grill

The sign out front said this is the place for wings (and it is, at least according to a vocal Facebook community of wing lovers). But my companion and I came for the fries drenched in cheese sauce and braised meat. The pot roast poutine hit all the wintry spots at this classic Champlin bar that retains midcentury charm, right down to the bar stools.

Maverick's was once the Landing, and it had a footprint twice its current size that butted right up to the Mississippi. In 2005, it became what you see today: a cozy, supper-clubby gathering spot with aesthetic touches of another era.

Yes, the wings should be up for consideration, especially with a menu full of unusual flavor combinations, like oyster sauce with pesto and balsamic drizzle. But the poutine ($12.99), with a comforting pot roast, sticky-sweet red wine and Guinness gravy, and smoked Gouda sauce over the crunchiest battered fries, had me clamoring to the bottom of the basket. (Sharyn Jackson)

Bone-in pork chop from Porter Creek Hardwood Grill

It was one of those days. My spouse and I were coming from opposite ends of the metro and meeting in the middle for dinner. The agreed-upon destination was Porter Creek in Burnsville, where he was waiting. I was at a similarly named restaurant 7 miles away.

We tried it again; this time I went to the right place, and was rewarded with a beauty of a colossal pork chop. The French-cut pork prime rib was grilled to tender, juicy, medium perfection, and dressed in an apricot-ginger glaze that added a hint of sweetness without being cloying, thanks to the bite of ginger. Asparagus spears, garlic mashed potatoes and an apricot chutney came along for the ride, making it a very filling (there's a bread basket, too) and memorable meal ($29.95).

Porter Creek's specialty is fire-roasted meats, which is evident by the aromas greeting you at the door. Owned by Minnesota's Roca Restaurants, the restaurant takes its culinary cues from Napa Valley, with a sprawling wine list to match. It's a cozy winter respite, perfect for a heavy dinner or a drink and appetizers. But be sure to visit in the summer, too — the patio is a stunner. (Nicole Hvidsten)

Banana Chocolate Chunk Danish at Cafe Alma

Sometimes I wonder, are bananas the most optimistic fruit? For one thing, it's a berry and a fruit. And for centuries bananas have traveled the world, bringing a taste of the tropics to people like, well, us, who are living in a climate that's known for temperature swings into arctic territory.

They're so useful that there's a TikTok trend claiming that rubbing the peels on your face has desirable anti-aging effects. But best of all, even when a banana's outward appearance has faded into a wrinkly brown mush, it's still eminently useful. Because when bananas are so ripe and its sweetness so concentrated, that's the best kind of banana for banana bread.

Until this week, I had taken for granted that banana bread with dark chocolate chips was my favorite way to enjoy these fruit-berries. That was when I spied the new seasonal pastry ($5) at Cafe Alma. "It's like all the good of banana bread in Danish form," said the person behind the counter.

Layers of buttery, flaked pastry cradle chopped bananas studded with chocolate chunks and topped with a kind of cookie crumb and a dusting of powdered sugar. The result is not overly sweet and thankfully free from extraneous add-ins (walnuts, I'm looking at you). Perhaps best of all, that crunchy, crumbly texture is the antithesis of the soft banana. The bananas inside the pastry retain some bite, too — just enough to give the teeth something to summit before devouring that ethereal pastry below. (J.S.)

528 University Av. SE, Mpls., 612-379-4909, almampls.com/cafe

Swine & Dine from Bao Bao Buns

Edward Zhang and Caitlin Higgins could have used a few pointers from other pop-ups when they started Bao Bao Buns last fall. Not about the food — that, Zhang has down. But choosing to launch at the Minneapolis Gift & Art Expo, a wildly busy weekend for a debut business?

"It was not smart on our part, but it went really well," Zhang said.

And, more generally, leaving the corporate world to pursue his food dreams, with the help of Higgins, his girlfriend — something Zhang thought would be seamless.

"We kind of wanted our time back, and now that we started this, we realized we not only didn't get our time back, we're putting more time into this," he said.

All that aside, Zhang and Higgins seem to have found a road map to success, even if it has some twists. In just four months, Zhang's creatively flavored bao buns are in small local shops (I got mine at Westside Wine & Spirits) and available to order on their website for pickup at their Hopkins kitchen.

Bao are Chinese steamed buns — fluffy and airy, part roll and part dumpling — with flavorful fillings. I got a package of Swine & Dine ($18), a traditional pork and cabbage filling that was as moist as the interior of a soup dumpling.

Zhang plans to collaborate with chefs on fillings that span to other cultures besides his own Chinese, while simultaneously putting a spotlight on the diversity of Chinese food.

"People still think of orange chicken and Mongolian beef and broccoli from Panda Express," he said. "Growing up in a Chinese household, there's a lot more that we can offer." (S.J.)

Pop-up with hot food Saturday Jan. 27 at Westside Market and 56 Brewing. Or order frozen buns for pickup in Hopkins at baobaobuns.com.

Joy Summers is a St. Paul-based food reporter who has been covering Twin Cities restaurants since 2010. She joined the Star Tribune in 2021.

joy.summers@startribune.com

Nicole Ploumen Hvidsten is the Star Tribune's Taste editor and senior editor of Star Tribune Magazine. In past journalistic lives she was a reporter, copy editor and designer — sometimes all at once — and has yet to find a cookbook she doesn't like.

nicole.hvidsten@startribune.com 612-673-7563

David King Named to Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2024

King led the organization to franchise records in corporate partnerships the past three seasonsMINNEAPOLIS and ST. PAUL – The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal named David King, Senior Vice President of Corporate Partnerships of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx a 40 Under 40 honoree. Since joining the Timberwolves and Lynx in 2014, King has earned multiple promotions, including his current role as Senior Vice President of Corporate Partnerships.“I’m incredibly grateful to be re...

King led the organization to franchise records in corporate partnerships the past three seasons

MINNEAPOLIS and ST. PAUL – The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal named David King, Senior Vice President of Corporate Partnerships of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx a 40 Under 40 honoree. Since joining the Timberwolves and Lynx in 2014, King has earned multiple promotions, including his current role as Senior Vice President of Corporate Partnerships.

“I’m incredibly grateful to be recognized and want to congratulate all the other honorees,” said King. “This award is truly a reflection of the incredible leaders who have invested in me, and the amazing team I’m blessed to work beside each day.”

“David is one of the most genuine and hardworking leaders I have had the pleasure to work alongside,” said Timberwolves and Lynx Chief Executive Officer Ethan Casson. “He has established himself as one of the brightest corporate partnership executives inside our league, and I am thrilled he is being recognized with this well-deserved honor.”

King has led the franchise to three consecutive record-setting seasons in corporate partnerships with double digit revenue growth each year. Focused on building meaningful relationships with local brands, King’s team added Fortune 500 UnitedHealthcare, Pentair, Marvin, Post Consumer Brands, Schwan’s Company and nVent to its partnership roster. King was also responsible for helping secure the Timberwolves jersey patch partner, Aura.

An innovator in the industry, King has led multiple best practices in recent years. As the NBA opened International Marketing Rights, he was responsible for the team’s first international partner, Caribou Coffee, who activated at the 2023 NBA Abu Dhabi Games. Additionally, King worked alongside partner Pentair to create Career Development Training Camps, designed to empower, educate, and inspire BIPOC students.

On behalf of the Minnesota Lynx, King helped spearhead the creation of Changemakers, a new local platform aimed at elevating the next generation of female leaders. Target has signed on as the inaugural partner.

The 40 Under 40 awards are in its 31st year and recognize local leaders under the age of 40 for their professional accomplishments, community involvement and industry leadership. The editorial team at Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal selected this year’s class from hundreds of nominations.

A feature profile on King and all honorees will be published online the week of March 18 and in a special print edition March 22. Honorees will be celebrated at an awards reception on March 21.

7 local restaurants earn nods from 2024 James Beard Awards

Four semifinalists will contend for national honors, including Best New Restaurant and Outstanding Bar, while three chefs are in the running for Best Chef Midwest.MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota has once again earned recognition both nationally and regionally for outstanding food service, landing seven restaurants on the ...

Four semifinalists will contend for national honors, including Best New Restaurant and Outstanding Bar, while three chefs are in the running for Best Chef Midwest.

MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota has once again earned recognition both nationally and regionally for outstanding food service, landing seven restaurants on the James Beard Foundation's 2024 Restaurant and Chef Awards semifinalist list.

The list, announced by the foundation Wednesday, includes local haunts contending in the awards' Outstanding Chef, Best New Restaurant, Outstanding Pastry Chef or Baker and Outstanding Bar nationally, while three Twin Cities-area businesses vie for Best Chefs Midwest Region.

National:

Regional:Best Chefs Midwest Region

Lisa Carlson and Carrie Summer of Bay City, Wisconsin's Chef Shack Bay City, were also nominated for the regional honor. While the eatery is now located in Wisconsin, Carlson and Summer first launched their business in the Twin Cities.

KARE 11's Gordon Severson spoke with the owners of Oro, Kate and Gustavo Romero, who said they never imagined their little Mexican restaurant in northeast Minneapolis would be nominated for a national award.

"We're very grateful," said Gustavo.

The idea came during the pandemic, when both had jobs at other local restaurants. They said when things got really tough, they looked for other ways to help pay the bills.

"We just did what we could," said Kate.

"... which was tortillas," added Gustavo.

The tortillas caught on, so they tried out ready-made meals and takeout. Eventually, they decided to open a small restaurant, featuring authentic ingredients — and lots of corn. That's where their company's name comes from, and it's the message behind these words hanging in their dining room.

"Without corn we have no country."

The duo brings corn in straight from Mexico, using several different kinds in their recipes.

While the Romeros say it's all very exciting, they say they really aren't prepared for what might happen next.

"It's only been a couple hours," said Kate.

"That was the first thing we thought about was like, 'What's going to happen now?'"

James Bear Award finalists will be announced on April 3, followed by the James Beard Restaurant and Chef Awards Ceremony on June 10 at the Lyric Opera of Chicago.

Many establishments and restaurateurs in Minnesota have already received the distinct honor of being nominated in recent years, including 2022 Best Restaurant winner Owamni by the Sioux Chef, which was erected by business partners Sean Sherman and Dana Thompson.

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Minnesota Moves to 4-0 After Friday’s Tennis Double Header

MINNEAPOLIS - The University of Minnesota tennis program extends its season-opening win streak to four after defeating North Dakota 6-1 and Creighton 6-1 at home on Friday. North Dakota will drop to 1-4 on the season and Creighton will drop to 0-2.Quote from Coach Arterberry "It was an overall good performance from the team," said head coach Lois Arterberry. "W...

MINNEAPOLIS - The University of Minnesota tennis program extends its season-opening win streak to four after defeating North Dakota 6-1 and Creighton 6-1 at home on Friday. North Dakota will drop to 1-4 on the season and Creighton will drop to 0-2.

Quote from Coach Arterberry "It was an overall good performance from the team," said head coach Lois Arterberry. "We got the job done despite our slow start in doubles during the first match today. We were able to turn it around in singles though, and play at a level that we are happy with. There is a lot of room for improvement that we'll address in the next week and a half, but, overall, we had a good day today."

Minnesota vs. North Dakota In doubles, the Gophers fought a close battle with the Fighting Hawks, but would ultimately lose the overall point. No. 3 pair Aiva Schmitz and Sofia Pizzoni struck first, winning 6-1 against Aziza Aubin and Lucia Rizza. North Dakota brought the round even with a 6-3 win over No. 2 Emma Belluomini and Anali Kocevar. It came down to a 6-6 tiebreaker between the top doubles pairs, with Sapir Sela and Andrea Jansson defeating Minnesota's Sofia Pinto and Mia Liepert 7(7)-6(5).

In singles, Minnesota swept North Dakota. Sofia Pinto put the first point on the board for the Maroon and Gold, winning 6-0, 6-3 against Aziza Aubin. It was Anali Kocevar who clinched the Gopher victory, defeating Nore Heinitz 6-4, 6-3. The Gophers went on to win the overall match 6-1.

Results Doubles 1. Mia Liepert and Sofia Pinto (UMN) lost to Sapir Sela and Andrea Jansson (UND) 7-6. 2. Emma Belluomini/Anali Kocevar (UMN) lost to Nore Heinitz/Jule Schulte (UND) 6-3. 3. Sofia Pizzoni and Aiva Schmitz (UMN) def. Aziza Aubin/Lucia Rizza (UND) 6-1.

Singles 1. Mia Liepert (UMN) def. Sapir Sela (UND) 6-1, 6-4. 2. Aiva Schmitz (UMN) def. Andrea Jansson (UND) 6-1, 6-2. 3. Anali Kocevar (UMN) def. Nore Heinitz (UND) 6-4, 6-3. 4. Emma Belluomini (UMN) def. Jule Schulte (UND) 6-3, 6-4. 5. Sofia Pinto (UMN) def. Aziza Aubin (UND) 6-0, 6-3. 6. Sofia Pizzoni (UMN) def. Lucia Rizza (UND) 6-2, 6-1.

Order of Finish Doubles: (3, 2, 1) Singles: (5,6, 2, 3, 1, 4)

Minnesota vs. Creighton The Gophers started the match strong, clinching the doubles point after winning its first two matches. No. 3 pair Aiva Schmitz and Sofia Pizzoni was the first to get a win, claiming a 6-3 victory over Allison Wilcox and Annika Elvestrom of the Fighting Hawks. No. 1 doubles Sofia Pinto and Mia Liepert earned Minnesota the overall point with their 6-4 win over Valerie Negin and Bianca Rademacher.

In singles, despite close matches, the Gophers went 5-1. Sofia Pizzoni finished first for the second time on Friday with her 6-0, 6-2 win over Allison Wilcox. Emma Belluomini clinched Minnesota's victory by defeating the Bluejays' Ana Paula Martinez 6-2, 6-3. The final three matches were defined by tiebreak points, with each match having at least one set go to tiebreak. Sophomore Sofia Pinto fought back from two three-game deficits in her first set before going on to win 7(7)-6(3), 6-1 against Annika Elvestrom. The Gophers topped the Bluejays 6-1 overall.

Results Doubles 1. Sofia Pinto and Mia Liepert (UMN) def. Valerie Negin and Bianca Rademacher (CU) 6-4. 2. Emma Belluomini and Anali Kocevar (UMN) def. Malvika Shukla and Ana Paula Martinez (CU) 5-4. 3. Aiva Schmitz and Sofia Pizzoni (UMN) def. Allison Wilcox and Annika Elvestrom (CU) 6-3.

Singles 1. Mia Liepert (UMN) lost to Malvika Shukla (CU) 4-6, 7(7)-6(3), 5-10. 2. Aiva Schmitz (UMN) def. Valerie Negin (CU) 6-0, 6-1. 3. Anali Kocevar (UMN) def. Bianca Rademacher (CU) 6-4, 4-6, 10-4. 4. Emma Belluomini (UMN) def. Ana Paula Martinez (CU) 6-2, 6-3. 5. Sofia Pinto (UMN) def. Annika Elvestrom (CU) 7(6)-7(3), 6-1. 6. Sofia Pizzoni (UMN) def. Allison Wilcox (CU) 6-0, 6-2.

Order of Finish Doubles: (3, 1, 2) Singles: (6, 2, 4, 3, 5, 1)

Next On The Docket The Gophers will return to Baseline Tennis Center on Feb. 10 to face South Dakota and St. Thomas. The matches will take place at 12:00 PM (CT) and 4:00 PM (CT), respectively.

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