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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in MSP, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim MSP, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in MSP, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in MSP, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in MSP, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in MSP, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in MSP, MN

MSP airport plans $242M Terminal 1 makeover, in biggest renovation since 1962

A planned $242 million overhaul of main terminal concourses and gate areas at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport is being called the single largest interior renovation since the building opened in 1962.The renovation of six of the seven concourses at Terminal 1 is set to be finished by late 2025, which means frequent travelers at MSP will continue to endure what seems like never-ending construction at the nation's 19th busiest airport.But it's all for a good cause, said officials from the Metropolitan Airports Commissio...

A planned $242 million overhaul of main terminal concourses and gate areas at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport is being called the single largest interior renovation since the building opened in 1962.

The renovation of six of the seven concourses at Terminal 1 is set to be finished by late 2025, which means frequent travelers at MSP will continue to endure what seems like never-ending construction at the nation's 19th busiest airport.

But it's all for a good cause, said officials from the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) and Delta Air Lines at a news conference Thursday.

"This is about creating an exceptional airport experience for the millions of passengers who travel through MSP to visit, to vacation and to conduct business here so that our economy thrives," said CEO Brian Ryks of the MAC, which owns and operates the airport.

The mere location of the event, on Concourse F, appeared to highlight the need for a refresh: Passengers en route to various cities in Florida were crammed into gate areas with negligible lighting, and the shade of the concourse carpeting could be charitably described as dingy beige.

The plan calls for a unified, modern design for the concourses and about 75 Delta gates that dovetails with improvements largely completed in the ticketing and baggage claim areas of the terminal, as well as Concourse G.

That will translate into terrazzo flooring in passenger corridors of Concourses A, C, D and G, with new carpet in Concourses B and F. New wall finishes are planned, including granite in public corridors and tile in Delta gate areas, as well as brighter LED lighting, technology upgrades for flight and gate information screens, and gate seating with more power outlets.

"These renovations will impact everything Delta passengers will see and experience from security checkpoints to their gates," Ryks said.

The MAC is investing $182.5 million of its own funds in the overall project, with Delta, MSP's dominant carrier, contributing $60 million; no taxpayer funds will be used. The planned expansion of Terminal 2, home to Minneapolis-based Sun Country Airlines, was not part of Thursday's announcement.

Early reviews of the project were positive.

"MSP is one of the most efficient airports in the country, but some of its concourses could definitely use a bit of love to get with the times," said Kyle Potter, executive editor of the Thrifty Traveler website.

Leila Navidi, Star Tribune

MAC and Delta officials said Thursday they remain bullish about post-pandemic travel demand.

"The great news is that the travel demand continues to be very strong, especially as we get ready for our busy holiday season here," said Jeannine Ashworth, Delta's vice president for airport operations at MSP.

The Atlanta-based airline continues to add flights from Minnesota, including to Dublin, Ireland; the Turks and Caicos in the Caribbean; Syracuse, N.Y.; and Cozumel, Mexico, next year.

"With these new destinations and the increased service we'll have 40 percent more seats out of Minneapolis" in coming years, Ashworth said. "Which is why it's so important to have the concourse and gate modernization project. It's the latest example of Delta's ongoing work to modernize the terminal and elevate the travel experience for our Minneapolis customers."

Ryks said Delta's management and financial investment in the project won't preclude other commercial carriers from coming to MSP, now served by 17 airlines.

Officials said there will be little disruption to flight activity during the renovations, since much of the work will be done during overnight hours. Delta's gates will remain open.

The renovation will take place in three phases. Work on Concourses D and F began in October, and the renovation of Concourse C begins in February. Improvements on Concourses A, B, G and the skyway bridge connecting Concourses C and G are scheduled for 2025.

The interior renovation will span 378,000 square feet — more than six football fields. It will incorporate many of the design changes the MAC has made during its expansion of the ticketing lobby and baggage claim areas, as well as Concourse G's modernization between gates G17 and G22.

"Like many airports around the country that sped up major infrastructure improvements when travel was practically nonexistent during the worst of the pandemic, MSP rightfully focused on the major expansion down in the G Concourse," Potter said.

The $80 million expansion of part of the G Concourse in 2022 also created space for a third Delta Sky Club at MSP.

"That area has brand new concessions, more natural light, higher ceilings and new seating. If that's the model for this project, travelers are in for a treat no matter which gate they're at," Potter said.

With Thursday's announcement, the MAC will have invested more than $1 billion in upgrades at Terminal 1 from "curb to gate" since 2016.

Leila Navidi, Star Tribune

That includes a $525 million expansion of the terminal by 30,000 square feet; redesigned ticketing and baggage levels, including new baggage carousels; consolidated checkpoints and improved central elevators and escalators. The project is winding down, with work on new ticket counters and baggage systems on the terminal's north end.

And work will continue next year on the G Concourse involving $330 million in renovations that will double the seating capacity of gates G8 through G13, two new sets of restrooms and additional space for concessions.

The MAC is also investing $6.5 million to reconfigure gate and ramp space in Concourses B and C to accommodate larger Delta aircraft.

"If they could relieve some of the congestion, that would be good," said Paul Sukut, who was traveling Thursday from his home in North Dakota to New York with his wife, Colette, and Chorkie mix pup Lily.

Sukut said he's been traveling through MSP for decades. "I love this airport," he said. "It's a beautiful airport, but construction is not unusual."

I moved from New Jersey to Minneapolis 4 years ago. The Midwest city totally won me over, and I don't plan on leaving.

Travel I moved from New Jersey to Minneapolis 4 years ago. The Midwest city totally won me over, and I don't plan on leaving. Facebook ...

Travel

I moved from New Jersey to Minneapolis 4 years ago. The Midwest city totally won me over, and I don't plan on leaving.

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I moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota, from Ewing, New Jersey, in 2019 to attend the University of Minnesota. I planned to earn my degree, get a job on the East Coast, and fall right back into the comfort of my hometown — but that never happened.

So many things about the Midwestern city won me over, so I decided to continue living here postgrad. Here are some reasons I fell in love with Minneapolis.

I can get anywhere I need to go without a car

I've never had a car in Minneapolis. Street parking generally isn't free, I'd need a garage in the winter, and I simply don't want to pay for gas.

In my hometown, there's only one major train station nearby and limited bus stops that aren't within walking distance. Fortunately, public-transportation stops in Minneapolis are within walking distance, cheap, and easy to navigate. A light-rail day pass brings me all around the Twin Cities — Minneapolis and St. Paul — for $5, and the express bus is only $2.50.

I also walk a lot in Minneapolis. I love having the convenient proximity to a variety of stores without the East Coast's busyness.

Winter here is actually beautiful

I expected the Minnesota winters to be unbearable, as the state's known for its below-freezing weather and blizzards often resulting in feet of snow. Surprisingly, I actually love the snow, even if it's way more than what I'm used to in New Jersey.

After learning how to dress with layers and walk on ice properly, the winters in Minneapolis quickly became nothing to worry about.

I like having snow in the city because it coats buildings and trees in a beautiful way, creating enjoyable scenery on my walks.

Minneapolis feels like a slower, more affordable version of other cities I like

I've always wanted to live in New York City or Philadelphia, but they're overwhelmingly busy. New York City's population is over 8 million, and Philadelphia's is about 2 million — Minneapolis consists of only about 430,000 people.

It's usually only swamped here on the weekends and peaceful during the week because there aren't as many tourists roaming around in the city.

Minneapolis is more expensive than its surrounding suburbs, but the cost of living has never come close to rent prices I've looked at on the East Coast — which is one of the biggest reasons I've stayed. My apartment in Minnesota costs $700 a month, whereas rent in New York City is more than double that price for anything of or below the same quality.

My absolute favorite part about Minneapolis is its art scene

I expected there to be a bigger art scene in Minneapolis when comparing the city to my New Jersey suburb of 36,000 people, but it's even better than I imagined.

The city has backyard performances featuring local bands almost every weekend, frequent art and vintage festivals, and even its own MN Fashion Week — with events similar to bigger cities.

The international cuisine seems more authentic than back home

There are more family-run restaurants in Minneapolis than what I'm used to, so a lot of restaurant dishes here taste just like a home-cooked meal.

My father's from Egypt, so I always yearn for an Arabic-inspired meal. Fortunately, there are a number of authentic-tasting restaurants in Minneapolis, like Afro Deli and Wally's Falafel and Hummus.

There aren't ocean beaches, but there are beautiful lakes

One of the most surprising things I had to get used to when I moved to the Midwest was the fact that people refer to lakes (even those with mostly grass, trees, and rocks) as "beaches."

But I've grown to love these freshwater lakes way more than "real" ocean beaches. The privacy and calm environment make the experience way more enjoyable than what I'm used to on the Jersey Shore, which feels less clean and more hectic.

Outdoor activities are more accessible — when it's warm enough

Although I think it's too cold to enjoy most outdoor activities for about half the year in Minnesota, experiencing spring and summer here has expanded my love for nature.

In and just outside of Minneapolis — 15 minutes away at most — there's tons of open land and nearby national parks to explore. Outdoor ventures include camping, hammocking, and visiting farmer's markets.

These activities were also available on the East Coast, but my suburban hometown is too densely populated to offer them with this much ease. I'd have to drive at least two hours to the nearest farmer's market and even longer for a campsite.

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Twin Cities airport set for $242 million in interior renovations

Updated: 12:30 p.m.Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport is getting a $242 million makeover.Leaders with the Metropolitan Airports Commission said MSP’s Terminal 1 will undergo renovations in its concourses and 75 gate areas — what officials are calling the largest interior renovation project for gates and concourses since the airport opened in 1962.The project will provide a “brighter, more modern” design across the terminal. The commission will invest $182.5 million, with Delta contributi...

Updated: 12:30 p.m.

Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport is getting a $242 million makeover.

Leaders with the Metropolitan Airports Commission said MSP’s Terminal 1 will undergo renovations in its concourses and 75 gate areas — what officials are calling the largest interior renovation project for gates and concourses since the airport opened in 1962.

The project will provide a “brighter, more modern” design across the terminal. The commission will invest $182.5 million, with Delta contributing $60 million.

“We’re proud to work with and have the support of Delta to deliver an expansive interior makeover that will create an exceptional airport experience for Delta passengers as they make their way from security checkpoints to their gates,” Brian Ryks, CEO of the Metropolitan Airports Commission, said in a news release. “It’s another major investment to create brighter, more modern spaces that complement MSP’s award-winning customer service.”

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At a news conference Thursday morning, Ryks outlined some of the work.

Gallery

“Key elements for the concourse improvements include more accessible and durable terrazzo flooring in four concourse walkways and new carpet in the other concourses, all-new wall finishes, brighter and more sustainable LED lighting and metal panel ceilings in concourse walkways, and technology upgrades that will include dynamic flight information screens at every gate,” he said.

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There will also be new seating with power outlets in gate areas. The renovations will include design elements that were part of the expansion and modernization of several gates along the airport’s Concourse G in 2022.

The project will be done in three phases, with the first already under way. The project is set to be complete in 2025.

“The bulk of the work is going to be completed in overnight hours,” said Bridget Rief, vice president for planning and development with the Metropolitan Airports Commission. “Delta is phasing the project so that the main impacts … are happening at night, minimizing impacts and issues during the day.”

A Delta spokesperson said the construction will not have any impact on the operations of its flights in and out of MSP.

Greater MSP vying for $75M to make MN an AI-enabled global medtech hub

Greater MSP and a consortium of big Minnesota employers are vying for a chunk of $500 million in federal funds to make Minnesota an artificial intelligence-enabled “Smart MedTech” hub.It’s part of the U.S. Economic Development Authority’s Tech Hubs Program, which aims to grow new innovation centers throughout the country to strengthen domestic economic and national security. The program was part of the CHIPS and Science Act of 2022, which earmarks $10 billion over five years.In the first phase of the pro...

Greater MSP and a consortium of big Minnesota employers are vying for a chunk of $500 million in federal funds to make Minnesota an artificial intelligence-enabled “Smart MedTech” hub.

It’s part of the U.S. Economic Development Authority’s Tech Hubs Program, which aims to grow new innovation centers throughout the country to strengthen domestic economic and national security. The program was part of the CHIPS and Science Act of 2022, which earmarks $10 billion over five years.

In the first phase of the program, 20 cities will get the tech hub status. The second phase will be cut down to five to 10 cities that will get $75 million for their respective regions.

RELATED: Why the CHIPS Act could be a 'carpe diem' moment for businesses

Greater MSP submitted the pitch on behalf of a group of companies, colleges and government agencies. It’s a general technology competition and Minnesota is angling its pitch around medical technology.

Members include the University of Minnesota, Minnesota State, Allina Health, Boston Scientific Corp., Medtronic, Mayo Clinic, Medical Alley Association, the Office of the Governor, Gener8tor and others.

The consortium isn’t planning to reinvent the wheel locally but rather accelerate efforts that are underway. Breaking down walls between systems will be one key aspect to grow the ecosystem. Health care providers, device makers, insurers all sit on insights related to their own technologies and platforms. “Sometimes those entities partner,” said Matt Lewis, vice president of strategic initiatives with Greater MSP.

“It's about remaining the [medtech] hub and growing our market share,” Lewis said. “We will judge success by the growth of Minnesota's market share in the global medtech industry.”

The initiative, dubbed Minnesota MedTech 3.0, will build on three of the U.S. EDA’s technology focus areas: medical technology, artificial intelligence and machine learning and advanced manufacturing.

AI-powered devices can better leverage data for remote patient monitoring, earlier diagnoses, timeline adjustments for early intervention and personalized therapies. AI and machine learning will also enable portable point-of-care diagnostics and robotic-assisted devices.

The application notes that “the modern MedTech industry was created in Minnesota and has thrived here." Andrew Alleyne, dean of the University of Minnesota’s College of Science and Engineering, wants it to stay here. He pointed to a collaboration of doctors and engineers who made the first pacemaker. Establishing Medtronic as a company then solidified the technology side of medtech in Minnesota, he said.

He added that Minnesota still has lasting aspects of its legacy in computing. The University expands on that and helps provide people and ideas to the ecosystem.

But he said there are some big players around the country jockeying for the funds. Similar efforts to Minnesota's are in the works in Ohio, North Carolina and Washington, for example.

“Speed is key,” he said of Minnesota’s need to cultivate the industry and capture the funds. “The opportunity will be capitalized on, that I can guarantee you. The question is where? It should happen here because the pieces are here.”

The U.S. EDA has been unclear on its timeline but says it could offer five awards to designated EDA Tech Hubs sometime this fall. Only those who are named in the first phase of the program will be able to apply for the second phase.

These are MSP airport's new and top destinations in 2023

Traffic at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport through the end of November is up compared to last year, but is still down compared to pre-pandemic levels.More than 20 million seats were on offer for flights originating at MSP this year through Nov. 30, according to aviation data analytics provider Cirium. That's 12% more than in 2022, but a 10% drop from 2019.Here's a look at the top 100 routes originating at MSP with the most seats in 2023:These routes originating at MSP had the most seats in 2023Page 1 of...

Traffic at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport through the end of November is up compared to last year, but is still down compared to pre-pandemic levels.

More than 20 million seats were on offer for flights originating at MSP this year through Nov. 30, according to aviation data analytics provider Cirium. That's 12% more than in 2022, but a 10% drop from 2019.

Here's a look at the top 100 routes originating at MSP with the most seats in 2023:

These routes originating at MSP had the most seats in 2023

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Table with 4 columns and 98 rows. Currently displaying rows 1 to 10. Sorted descending by column "Seats 2023"
Denver International Airport896,7451,114,94124%
Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport724,214769,0176%
Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport673,289721,3487%
Chicago O'Hare International Airport660,357718,8389%
Harry Reid International Airport656,029686,3625%
Los Angeles International Airport588,358579,471−2%
Orlando International Airport585,380560,781−4%
Seattle–Tacoma International Airport534,237543,4932%
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport476,677510,8157%
Gen. Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport403,128446,99811%

Table: Ethan NelsonSource: CiriumGet the dataCreated with Datawrapper

Cirium measures seats airlines have scheduled for given routes, which don't necessarily match exactly the true number of passengers who are flying on those routes. Still, the figures offer a way to measure the popularity of different routes.

Among the top 100 busiest routes in 2023, flights to Seoul-Incheon International Airport in South Korea saw the greatest increase, up about 700% thanks to Delta restoring daily nonstop flights to the location in October. Others that saw the biggest increases include Destin-Forth Walton Beach Airport in Florida and Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport in Québec, Canada.

Routes within the top 100 busiest that saw the biggest decreases include those to Southwest Florida International Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City and Salt Lake City International Airport.

A number of routes are new to MSP in 2023. Others that flew in 2022 didn't have seats in 2023 and appear to have been dropped or suspended. Take a look at those routes here:

These are the routes that appeared to be new for 2023 (had seats this year but not in 2022) or dropped (did not have seats in 2023 but did in 2022) according to Cirium data.

Table with 2 columns and 10 rows.
Tokyo International AirportLincoln Airport
Chippewa Valley Regional Airport (Eau Claire, WI)Quad City International Airport (Moline, IL)
City of Colorado Springs Municipal AirportSawyer International Airport (Marquette, MI)
Great Falls International Airport (Great Falls, MT)William P. Hobby Airport (Houston)
Edmonton International Airport
Saskatoon International Airport
Wilmington International Airport (Wilmington, NC)
Melbourne Orlando International Airport
Owen Roberts International Airport (Grand Cayman)
Pierre Regional Airport (Pierre, SD)

Table: Ethan NelsonSource: CiriumGet the dataCreated with Datawrapper

Preliminary data for the coming year show that three hubs have the most seats on offer in the first quarter: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport and Orlando International Airport.

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