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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Plymouth, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Plymouth, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Plymouth, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Plymouth, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Plymouth, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Plymouth, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Plymouth, MN

Youth soccer club opens new indoor training facility in Plymouth

Fusion Soccer Club — one of Minnesota's largest youth soccer programs — is celebrating the grand opening of a new space this weekend in Plymouth.PLYMOUTH, Minnesota — One of Minnesota's largest youth soccer clubs is expanding in order to meet demand for its programming.Currently, Fusion Soccer Club rents three domes every single day of the week."We simply need more sp...

Fusion Soccer Club — one of Minnesota's largest youth soccer programs — is celebrating the grand opening of a new space this weekend in Plymouth.

PLYMOUTH, Minnesota — One of Minnesota's largest youth soccer clubs is expanding in order to meet demand for its programming.

Currently, Fusion Soccer Club rents three domes every single day of the week.

"We simply need more space," said Keith Pavelka, executive director for Fusion SC.

Fusion SC, which serves the Wayzata and Plymouth communities, was formed in 2014 through the merger of Plymouth Soccer Association and Wayzata Soccer Club. They work with kids ages 3-19.

"We have everything from rec kids to competitive programming and we have about 3,000 kids in our program," Pavelka said.

The popularity of the program led Fusion SC in April to look for more room. They ended up finding a 20,000-square-foot space in Plymouth, now home to their offices and an indoor soccer facility that can hold about 50 players.

"It's the biggest we've ever been," said Chad Morse, girls director of coaching and a director of programming for the new facility. "With this space, we get asked the question, 'Are you going to rent less space at different facilities?' And the answer is 'no.' This is kind of in addition to what we're already programming."

Morse said the new facility will give them more flexibility and allow them to do more programming.

At the end of the year, Fusion SC will launch a program called INFINITI Soccer & Performance Training where they will offer private and small group trainings.

"Youth soccer... Minnesota is on the map not only in the region, in the Midwest region, but a lot of our teams and other clubs around the state are putting their teams in a great position to compete nationally which is exciting," Morse said.

Fusion SC will hold a grand opening on Sunday, Oct. 29 from 2-7 p.m. The public is welcome to attend. Vendors Rock Elm Food Truck, Honey & Mackie's Ice Cream and Honey P's Boutique will also be there.

Fusion SC Headquarters 3500 Holly Lane NorthSuite 10Plymouth, MN 55447

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Developing a downtown Plymouth

Listen to this articleFor the first time, Plymouth’s entire City Center area could allow residential.The city is overhauling its City Center plan, aiming to create a sense of place for its downtown area. The City Center 2.0 update includes a massive overhaul of Plymouth’s City Center Design Standards.Some other proposed allowed uses include:Prohibited uses would include buildings that lack a pedestrian-scale footprint like a Walmart or gun range, drive-thrus, pawn shops, industrial buildings, auto-orie...

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For the first time, Plymouth’s entire City Center area could allow residential.

The city is overhauling its City Center plan, aiming to create a sense of place for its downtown area. The City Center 2.0 update includes a massive overhaul of Plymouth’s City Center Design Standards.

Some other proposed allowed uses include:

Prohibited uses would include buildings that lack a pedestrian-scale footprint like a Walmart or gun range, drive-thrus, pawn shops, industrial buildings, auto-oriented uses like car repair shops and self-storage buildings.

“It’s more [about] that sense of place. That’s kind of hard to quantify or describe, but when you know it, you can kind of feel it when you’re in those special places,” said Plymouth’s Senior Planner Lori Sommers. “So providing those connections, providing that while you’re walking down the street, you don’t feel kind of in the middle of nowhere.”

The hope for the reinvention is to bring in more entertainment and nightlife while bringing in residents to feed the commercial uses.

During community engagement, the city found that residents want walkable gathering spaces for families that have opportunities for eating and entertainment. Respondents broadly welcomed mixed-use apartments, more bike and pedestrian trails and outdoor cafes.

Plymouth’s City Center is an area around Vicksburg Lane and Highway 55 that stretches east to Fernbrook Lane and some of which reaches north to Rockford Road. It’s home to City Hall and other civic buildings along with a variety of amenities like a movie theater, a park, medical services and retail.

It’s also home to acres of surface parking lots. “There’s where a lot of our opportunity lies,” Sommers said, adding that there’s an expectation for more infill redevelopment and hiding parking or putting it into a structured ramp. City leaders understand that cars will be a major driver to the City Center as they also seek to make it more walkable and transit friendly.

The city is likely to ask developers to do things like focus on bikeability and walkability, consider art with new construction, add “high-quality” landscaping, abut buildings to the street and implement main floor active uses.

Planning Commissioner Michael Boo said at a recent meeting that he wants to see a greater emphasis on density. He pointed to 50th and France in Edina and Minneapolis’ North Loop as a place with “vibrancy” because of the concentration of activity and buildings.

“Most of the buildings, if you drive around City Center right now, they’re mostly one-story,” he said. He hopes that will change to integrate more mixed uses within structures.

Planning and development manager Chloe McGuire said the city has already received multiple questions about City Center. “Developers are, I think, really excited about this because they can do that density,” she said at the meeting.

The city also owns much of the east side of Plymouth Boulevard and could make improvements to help spur development, she said.

Sommers said as Plymouth’s remaining greenfield is overtaken by homes, a new kind of developer is showing interest in the area — those with specialties in redevelopment that may be better equipped to meet the goals for City Center.

City staff members are finalizing the design guidelines and code updates this month with more public city discussions expected in the summer. The hope is the new code and guidelines will be in effect by the end of summer.

“There should be some exciting movement in the next few years,” Sommers said.

Plymouth autoworkers join UAW picket as strike efforts ramp up at Stellantis and GM

UAW strike organizers expanded locations for Stellantis and General Motors pickets on Friday.PLYMOUTH, Minn. — Union employees at a parts plant in Plymouth are back on the picket line for day 12 of the United Auto Workers' strike,Workers at the Stellantis parts distribution plant will be joined by union members from across the state and region around 8 a.m. Tuesday. Organizers said this rally will happen despite ...

UAW strike organizers expanded locations for Stellantis and General Motors pickets on Friday.

PLYMOUTH, Minn. — Union employees at a parts plant in Plymouth are back on the picket line for day 12 of the United Auto Workers' strike,

Workers at the Stellantis parts distribution plant will be joined by union members from across the state and region around 8 a.m. Tuesday. Organizers said this rally will happen despite rain heading their way.

On Friday, the UAW strike expanded to 38 parts distribution centers for Stellantis and GM, including the plant in Plymouth.

Union leaders say the companies rejected some of their proposals. Ford has allegedly met some of the union's demands so UAW members did not strike in additional locations operated by that automaker, according to the union.

According to the Associated Press, the union is looking for 36% raises in general pay over four years, a 32-hour work week with 40 hours of pay, pensions for new hires and cost-of-living raises, among other benefits.

Since Friday, Plymouth employees have been manning the picket line 24/7. On Tuesday morning, many passing cars were honking in support of the workers.

"We've been sacrificing as workers for the corporation and we haven't been complaining," UAW member Dan Manuel said. "I don't mind staying out here, I'll stay out here 'til we get what we want."

The Plymouth Stellantis plant is the only striking location in Minnesota. In Wisconsin, two auto parts distributors are striking in Hudson and Milwaukee.

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National UAW strike expands to Twin Cities area

Updated: Sept. 23, 6:30 p.m. | Posted: Sept. 22, 8:07 p.m.Workers picketed for a second day outside of an auto parts warehouse in Plymouth, Minn., on Saturday after United Auto Workers leaders expanded the union's strike against the Big Three automakers.More than 5,000 workers at 38 General Motors and Stellantis parts distribution centers are now part of the strike, UAW President Shawn Fain said Friday.That includes the Stellantis Mopar Parts Distribution Center along Highway 55 where striking workers carried signs and...

Updated: Sept. 23, 6:30 p.m. | Posted: Sept. 22, 8:07 p.m.

Workers picketed for a second day outside of an auto parts warehouse in Plymouth, Minn., on Saturday after United Auto Workers leaders expanded the union's strike against the Big Three automakers.

More than 5,000 workers at 38 General Motors and Stellantis parts distribution centers are now part of the strike, UAW President Shawn Fain said Friday.

That includes the Stellantis Mopar Parts Distribution Center along Highway 55 where striking workers carried signs and waved at passing vehicles.

Mopar workers argued Saturday that a two-tiered wage system puts the company at a disadvantage in the labor market. New hires and temporary employees are paid less than half the wages of long-time staff for the same work, while missing out on benefits like profit sharing and holiday pay, according to health and safety coordinator David Carlson.

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“You can go to Target and make $20 an hour. You can go to Amazon and start off at $20 an hour. Why would you start here at $15 an hour?” asked Mopar employee Jeff Stevenson.

Stevenson has worked for Stellantis for over 20 years. He and three other colleagues were displaced last March after the closure of an assembly plant in Belvidere, Ill., where he estimates up to 300 people at a time worked for lower wages.

He said it was unfair for new hires — who must work eight years before getting a similar salary — while also creating animosity between coworkers.

UAW Local 125 secretary-treasurer John Kontzelmann said the strike has received support from other Minnesota labor advocates.

“We have to be united behind workers, so that we can be sure that our economy stays strong for everyone,” said State Rep. Ginny Klevorn, DFL-Plymouth.

Kontzelmann said the Minnesota AFL-CIO is scheduled to hold a rally outside the Plymouth facility on Tuesday, Sept. 26 at 8 p.m.

Union officials said a strike at the facility is unusual and they have generally a good working relationship with management.

The Mopar facility shutdown impacts delivery of parts to Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge Ram dealerships across the Upper Midwest and parts of Canada.

Meanwhile, workers at the General Motors Parts Distribution Center in Hudson, Wis., plan to strike in shifts around the clock.

"We're out 24/7,” said Steve Frisque, president of UAW Local 722. “We'll be out here until they tell us anything different till we get a contract. So that takes a day or that takes two months. I hope it doesn't take two months but we are out indefinitely we're not going back in until the international gets a contract and we ratify it and then we will go back to work.”

Three of the workers Frisque represents live in the same house in nearby Spring Valley, Wis. Jeff and Jodie Schmidt, and their adult son, all work at the distribution center.

Jeff said he's optimistic that the walkout will lead to a better contract.

“We're glad to do it. Sounds like everybody was anticipating being called up. They wanted to participate,” he said.

Jeff said they will have to cut back to make up for lost wages during the strike, but he and his wife Jodie think it will be worth it in the long run.

“We just are trying to keep things simple and not you know, do all that extra stuff,” Jodie said.

Workers on the picket line get strike pay benefits from the union, Frisque said. He said the people he represents are glad their union is fighting for a better contract.

“There's a sense of, you know, this is the right thing to do. We've been giving to General Motors for years. We keep giving, giving and giving, and they don't want to ever give anything back, so the line was drawn in the sand and this is what we need to do and hopefully GM comes back to the table,” he said.

The workers are asking for wage increases and cost-of-living adjustments, but the automakers say the demands would put them as a competitive disadvantage, according to NPR.

Plymouth Megachurch Proposal Receives Opposition from Neighbors

Eagle Brook Church, which currently holds services at Wayzata High School, is making plans to build a new house of worship on a plot of farmland in Plymouth.The Twin Cities megachurch has signed a purchase agreement for a 54-acre site just north of Meadow Ridge Elementary School on Chankahda Trail, formerly County Road 47. But residents in the area have circulated a petition against the building plan.“A question I have is why here, why this location,” wondered resident Erika Dalager, who lives near the proposed site...

Eagle Brook Church, which currently holds services at Wayzata High School, is making plans to build a new house of worship on a plot of farmland in Plymouth.

The Twin Cities megachurch has signed a purchase agreement for a 54-acre site just north of Meadow Ridge Elementary School on Chankahda Trail, formerly County Road 47. But residents in the area have circulated a petition against the building plan.

“A question I have is why here, why this location,” wondered resident Erika Dalager, who lives near the proposed site.

Eagle Brook Church has held services at Wayzata High School since 2018, but wants a permanent campus in Plymouth due to growing attendance. The megachurch currently has 10 locations in Minnesota and will open two more churches soon – one in Minneapolis and another in Maplewood. Across all locations, Eagle Brook reports a combined average weekly in-person attendance of 20,000 people.

Jason Strand, senior pastor at Eagle Brook Church, said attendance at Wayzata High School has grown 32 percent since establishing the temporary campus in 2018.

The church began focusing on Plymouth after opposition thwarted a proposal to build a permanent campus in Minnetonka, replacing a vacant retirement home near a wetland west of Interstate Highway 494. Traffic and environmental impacts in that neighborhood were the chief concerns.

Now, Dalager is one of hundreds of people who have signed an online petition opposing the church at the Plymouth site, citing concerns about traffic, the environment and their overall quality of life.

“These are all residential roads. This road was just finished a few months ago, so it’s really not built for a large complex that would be serving thousands of people,” said Dalager, referring to Chankahda Trail.

Plymouth Senior Planner Shawn Drill has heard the concerns.

“We’ve gotten a lot of comments, both for and against the project,” he said.

Drill said the wetlands on the property are federally protected, so any construction would take place on the farmland area. As for traffic, Drill said there’s a study underway that will determine what sort of measures would have to be taken to alleviate resident concerns.

Eagle Brook has not yet submitted a formal application and the sale of the property is contingent upon city approval.

“We are excited to have a permanent campus so we can continue serving this community and helping people grow in the their faith,” said Pastor Strand in a statement.

Eagle Brook Church plans to hold a meeting where people can learn more about its proposal. That meeting will take place Wednesday, Sept. 20, at 6 p.m. at Wayzata High School.

Also See: Plymouth To Consider Redevelopment Plans for Prudential Site

Plymouth

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