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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in San Antonio, TX?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim San Antonio, TX

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in San Antonio, TX, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in San Antonio, TX

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in San Antonio, TX?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in San Antonio, TX

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in San Antonio, TX

San Antonio oncology practice, laboratory to pay $4 million in settlement over kickback allegations

Oncology San Antonio, entered into illegal kickback arrangement with CorePath Laboratories, federal officials allegeSAN ANTONIO – A San Antonio cancer care network and a diagnostic reference laboratory have agreed to pay more than $4 million in civil settlements after federal officials uncovered an illegal kickback arrangement, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas said.According to federal officials, Oncology San Antonio and its affiliated physicians agreed to pay $1.3 mill...

Oncology San Antonio, entered into illegal kickback arrangement with CorePath Laboratories, federal officials allege

SAN ANTONIO – A San Antonio cancer care network and a diagnostic reference laboratory have agreed to pay more than $4 million in civil settlements after federal officials uncovered an illegal kickback arrangement, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas said.

According to federal officials, Oncology San Antonio and its affiliated physicians agreed to pay $1.3 million, and CorePath Laboratories agreed to pay $2.7 million plus accrued interest to the US and the State of Texas to resolve alleged violations of the False Claims Act.

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The investigation alleges the two medical companies entered into an unlawful kickback arrangement in August 2016. CorePath Laboratories provided in-office bone marrow biopsy services at Oncology San Antonio practice locations and performed subsequent diagnostic testing on the biopsies. According to federal officials, CorePath Laboratories agreed to pay $115 for each biopsy referred by Oncology San Antonio and its physicians. The payments for each referred biopsy were paid to the private practice entities of three Oncology San Antonio physicians.

Federal officials said the payments for the biopsies referrals constituted kickbacks within the meaning of the Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits offering, paying, soliciting, or receiving remuneration to induce referrals of items or services covered by a federal health care program, such as Medicare, Medicaid, or TRICARE. Claims submitted in violation of the Anti-Kickback Statute may give rise to liability under the False Claims Act.

The civil settlement with Oncology San Antonio and its physicians also resolves allegations that Dr. Jayasree Rao, through Oncology San Antonio and her own oncology and hematology practice entity, provided medically unnecessary tests, services, and treatments to Medicare, TRICARE, and Texas Medicaid beneficiaries in the San Antonio Metro Area, and billed the federal healthcare programs for the medically unnecessary tests, services and treatments, federal officials said.

Rao retired from practicing medicine in March due to personal and health-related reasons, according to the Oncology San Antonio website.

“Illegal financial incentives to physicians undermine the integrity of our healthcare system and impair the objective judgment of the community’s healthcare professionals,” said U.S. Attorney Jaime Esparza. “These settlements demonstrate my office’s commitment to protect federal healthcare programs against such violations, as well as other efforts to defraud these programs.”

Oncology San Antonio released the following statement in regards to the settlement:

The physicians of Oncology San Antonio are gratified that this suit, brought almost a decade ago by a disgruntled former employee, is settled. Oncology San Antonio and its physicians cooperated in all respects with the protracted investigation, which resulted in no findings of impropriety or wrongdoing whatsoever. Our oncologists remain dedicated to providing exemplary, personalized and compassionate care to the San Antonio community.

Ultimately, Oncology San Antonio agreed to a no-fault settlement rather than a lengthy trial. We appreciate the unwavering support from our fellow community physicians, Oncology San Antonio employees, associates and patients.

Copyright 2024 by KSAT - All rights reserved.

That’s a wrap! 8th annual BexarFest announces winners

Win or lose, students have new material for their portfolios, and nonprofits have fresh videos to help promote the work they do in the communitySAN ANTONIO – The 8th annual BexarFest celebrated another successful event Monday at the Tobin, putting the spotlight on multimedia high school students.“Definitely exciting, a lot of nerves,” said the team from Judson Early College Academy.The event is organized by TRL Productions, and this year they partnered with 19 high schools and 19 nonp...

Win or lose, students have new material for their portfolios, and nonprofits have fresh videos to help promote the work they do in the community

SAN ANTONIO – The 8th annual BexarFest celebrated another successful event Monday at the Tobin, putting the spotlight on multimedia high school students.

“Definitely exciting, a lot of nerves,” said the team from Judson Early College Academy.

The event is organized by TRL Productions, and this year they partnered with 19 high schools and 19 nonprofits. TRL Productions Board President Buddy Calvo says the experience is a win-win for everyone involved.

“Students get the experience they need to be working with real professional clients, and nonprofits get these marketing assets that they use to fulfill their mission, and in general, we’re introducing kids to a career path,” said Calvo.

The six-month project gave students real-world experience. Many we spoke to say the opportunity was eye-opening and simply a lot of fun.

“Going to film on-site somewhere because that’s not something we get to do in class a lot, so going out during the school day was really really fun; our teacher bought us canes shout-out to her,” said the Boerne Champion team

“I want to go into film, but now that I’ve done this compositional piece, I kind of feel maybe I want to do movie scoring, so it’s definitely broader my horizons both to what’s possible and what I’m capable of doing,” said a team member from Jusdon Early College Academy.

At the event, students celebrated their hard work in style with a red carpet hosted by KSAT Meteorologist Sarah Spivey.

“It makes us feel a little bit like celebrities,” laughed the Stevens High School team.

“Tell me about the shades indoors; that’s a bold statement,” asked KSAT’s John Paul Barajas.

“My future is just that bright,” joked a team member.

Students were awarded for their films, including in categories that include Best Cinematography and Best Sound.

Win or lose, students have new material for their portfolios, and nonprofits have fresh videos to help promote the work they do in the community.

Full list of winners:

Copyright 2024 by KSAT - All rights reserved.

San Antonio Zoo teases return of Brackenridge park Sky Ride as April Fools' joke

Keeping with a tradition, the San Antonio Zoo trotted out its annual April Fools prank on Monday, claiming in a phony news release that it's resurrecting the Alamo City's long-gone Sky Ride.For those new to town, the Sky Ride was a gondola attraction at Brackenridge Park that offered riders an aerial view of the zoo, the Japanese Tea Garden and the park grounds. It operated from 1964 until it was decommissioned in 1999.On Monday, Zoo officials pulled a fast one on local reporters and unsuspecting residents, announcing it will u...

Keeping with a tradition, the San Antonio Zoo trotted out its annual April Fools prank on Monday, claiming in a phony news release that it's resurrecting the Alamo City's long-gone Sky Ride.

For those new to town, the Sky Ride was a gondola attraction at Brackenridge Park that offered riders an aerial view of the zoo, the Japanese Tea Garden and the park grounds. It operated from 1964 until it was decommissioned in 1999.

On Monday, Zoo officials pulled a fast one on local reporters and unsuspecting residents, announcing it will use the gondolas to connect its facilities to the booming Peal district.

“On almost a daily basis, someone will mention the Sky Ride to me and ask when or if it will return,” San Antonio Zoo President and CEO Tim Morrow said in a statement.” We’ve been wanting to bring this iconic ride back to San Antonio, and this new concept is a perfect complement to the growth of midtown and its incredible amenities.”

But alas, it was all a joke. And a cruel one at that. Who wouldn't want to see the Sky Ride make a return?

Be that as it may, at least one media outlet appeared to take the bait. Talk radio station WOAI-AM initially ran an on online article on the zoo's plan then took it down.

The San Antonio Zoo has seized on April 1 as an excuse to pull fast ones on unsuspecting San Antonio residents since at least 2020. That year, the zoo issued a news release saying keepers had allowed three of its elephants to roam around Brackenridge Park and take a dip in the San Antonio River.

KSAT and national publication The Hill both reported the elephant story before realizing they'd been had.

Last year, the zoo joked that it was opening a Boerne-based beaver exhibit dubbed “Beaver Tales Wilde Life Park” in collaboration with the truck stop operator Buc-ees, whose mascot is — you guessed it — a smiling, buck-toothed beaver.

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April 8 total solar eclipse will be the first over San Antonio since 1397!

Odds are you’ve seen one or two partial solar eclipses in your lifetime. In fact, we saw an annular eclipse in 2023 and a partial eclipse in 2017. But a total solar eclipse? That’s a rarity. In fact, the last time the path of a total solar eclipse passed through the area we know as ...

Odds are you’ve seen one or two partial solar eclipses in your lifetime. In fact, we saw an annular eclipse in 2023 and a partial eclipse in 2017. But a total solar eclipse? That’s a rarity. In fact, the last time the path of a total solar eclipse passed through the area we know as “San Antonio” was back in May of 1397 — 627 years ago!

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Think of San Antonio’s history. What do you think about? Probably the Alamo and other Spanish missions. But this last total eclipse happened hundreds of years before the Spanish colonized the area. What did life look like more than 600 years ago in the Alamo City, long before the Alamo even existed?

First and foremost, things would have been a lot greener. With no development and fewer people requiring resources, our natural springs would flow more often.

Check out this video below of Honey Creek Spring Ranch - an area recently protected through conservation efforts. You’ll get an idea of what the land was like 600 years ago:

“Texas was a great place to live. It wasn’t called Texas at the time, but it would have been a beautiful natural area,” says Lesli Hicks, assistant professor of history at UTSA.

Hicks adds, “We have talked about Historic Texas as having 11,000 streams, so the water would have been plentiful, a little bit different from today. We’re struggling with that in drought [now], but water would have been plentiful. It would have been a bit greener.”

The area we now know as northeastern Mexico and southern Texas, including San Antonio, was home to the Coahuiltecan Native Americans. When the Spanish first colonized the region in the late 1600s and early 1700s, the Payaya, Papanac, Tilijae, and Pampopa were names associated to the bands and clans of the different families that lived in the area.

A common misconception about the Coahuiltecans is that they were hunter/gatherers, aimlessly wandering around.

However, Ramón Vásquez, executive director of the American Indians in Texas at Spanish Colonial Missions says, “What we’re learning today is that it was just the opposite. It was a very high level of sophistication that just wasn’t understood at the time.”

And it’s with that level of sophistication that the Coahuiltecans would be experiencing the eclipse in 1397. We can speculate that it would have been a spiritual event, too.

“All the celestial beings were faces of God,” says Vásquez. “It would have just been a moment of validation of their belief system of two becoming one.”

In fact, there’s evidence of the Spanish using these beliefs in converting locals at Mission Concepción. In one of the rooms at the Mission, there is a fresco that shows the sun and the moon together. In the middle of the two is a very Spanish face — complete with a fancy mustache and goatee. In this way, the Franciscan friars were symbolizing that their god - Jesus - was the true God, more important than the sun and moon.

It was at Mission Concepción that much of the local Coahuiltecan’s language and culture was changed as they were assimilated by the Spanish. So who and where are the Coahuiltecans now?

“Well, one’s being interviewed by KSAT 12 right now,” laughs Vásquez. “There are over 100,000 lineal descendants in San Antonio. They’re politicians. They sit on our City Council. They’re doctors. They’re delivering children right now. They’re teachers. They’re teaching our children. They’re priests. They’re ministering to our people, our families. They’re legislators.”

And although we have no record of what the Native Americans who witnessed the 1397 solar eclipse were feeling, Vasquez imagines, “it probably drew fear or probably drew love — every emotion that human beings would have today.”

On April 8, it’ll be through those human emotions that we will be connected to the people who viewed a similar total solar eclipse — 627 years ago.

San Antonio's top 10 chefs are writing a new chapter on local cuisine

It's a credit to the San Antonio culinary scene's growth that this year's nominees for the Tastemaker Award for Chef of the Year are more diverse than ever. We don't just mean that there is a wider variety of faces but also that each prospective winner approaches food in singular ways. It's clearer than ever that the key to great food lies in biography.We've only touched the surface with our profiles below. Still, all are making Alamo City more...

It's a credit to the San Antonio culinary scene's growth that this year's nominees for the Tastemaker Award for Chef of the Year are more diverse than ever. We don't just mean that there is a wider variety of faces but also that each prospective winner approaches food in singular ways. It's clearer than ever that the key to great food lies in biography.

We've only touched the surface with our profiles below. Still, all are making Alamo City more storied than ever. Eat at these chef's restaurants for the richer tale, then join us on April 4 when we reveal the winners at the Briscoe Museum. (There's still some tickets available before selling out.) In the meantime, catch up on our special editorial series profiling all of this year’s nominees.

Here are the nominees for Chef of the Year:

Andrew Ho, Andrew Samia, and Sean Wen, Curry Boys BBQGrowing up in Houston, Ho and Wen were engrossed in cross-cultural cuisine from an early age. First making a splash with Viet-Cajun seafood boils, the pair found new alchemy when teaming up with pitmaster Samia. Like Beyoncé, the trio is now exposing the limits of genre, producing deeply personal fare. Call it fusion or Thai barbecue or make up a name; it's food that refuses to be pigeonholed.

Berty Richter, LadinoRichter first appeared on the Texas radar screen with an East Austin food truck. It was clear then that a tiny space couldn't contain his ambition. Now afforded a showstopping Pearl space, his aim is even higher. Ladino expresses a singular heritage, using recipes passed down from generations. In an industry timid of innovation (can we finally press pause on charred Brussels sprouts?), Richter boldly leads with POV.

Ceasar Zepeda, Sangria on the Burg, Saucy BirdsWhen Sangria on the Burg became untenable, Zepeda switched gears to fast casual. But it was clear he wouldn't throw the baby out with the bathwater. Though adopting a simplified menu at Saucy Birds, the chef is still proving his knack for cooking approachable, uncompromising fare. He remains the San Antonio restaurant scene's consummate everyman.

Christopher Cullum, Cullum's AttaboyCullum's culinary education began by washing dishes at his father's River Walk jazz club. The Landing's unforced hospitality and classical fare left an indelible impression. With Attaboy, he remains committed to reviving a history before meals were eaten on dashboards and gimmickry became more important than coherence. That attitude may be out of time, but it's also eternal.

Diego Galicia & Rico Torres, MixtliThough Mexican fare found quick success in the United States, it hasn't always been particularly valued. Galicia and Torres were among a vanguard of chefs calling for a reclamation. Heavily researched and immaculately presented, the pair honors pre-Hispanic and indigenous techniques while bucking against decades of racialized preconceptions. In the process, they rewrote rules for who is allowed in the culinary conversation.

Emil Oliva, Leche de TigreOliva first developed a passion for Peruvian fare at 12, when he moved from Texas to his father's home country. Returning to the Lone Star State in 2012, he brought that love back. After paying his dues in the front-of-house of Costa Pacifica, Oliva started a series of pop-ups with no commercial cooking experience. After a year of tasting his standout brick-and-mortar, locals should feel blessed he is such a quick learner.

Francisco Estrada and Lizzeth Martinez, NacoThank the stars for Theory Coffee Co. The lauded truck's brews impressed Estrada and Martinez enough that they wanted to provide a breakfast to match. Though the couple has branched out since those early days, they have remained dedicated to improving San Antonio's A.M. hours. Mexico City chilaquiles are enlivened with a deeply roasted sauce, and the unfussy tacos let every ingredient shine.

Jennifer Hwa Dobbertin, Best Quality DaughterSometimes, fine-dining chefs bother themselves with cooking for other chefs. Dobbertin seems to be having too much fun. Whether creating a Crunchwrap Supreme for Taco Bell or Korean corn cheese spring rolls for her Pearl restaurant, she never loses sight of the pleasure of eating. Those big ideas still impress jaded industry types without snubbing the masses.

Nicola Blaque, The Jerk ShackWhether riffing on Caribbean cuisine or celebrating her entrepreneurial forebears, Blaque's food is unapologetically Black. Even in 2024, that matters. For too long, history has insisted that a Eurocentric outlook is essential in creating "elevated" food; She applies her classical training to making the best version of traditional fare, arguing that the contributions of generations of women are enough on their own.

Sue Kim, MagpieA whirlwind in the kitchen, Kim cut her teeth cooking in New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Los Angeles, and San Antonio's dearly missed Minnie's Tavern. All that globe-trotting informed the food coming out of her East Side bistro. Though rooted in world flavors, it doesn't have the cynicism of New American. Instead, it collects the best dishes worldwide, building Alamo City's most awe-inspiring nest.

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