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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Seattle, WA?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Seattle, WA

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Seattle, WA, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Seattle, WA

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Seattle, WA?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Seattle, WA

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Seattle, WA

Rainier View principal transferred after years of parent, staff complaints

After years of parent and staff complaints about Rainier View Elementary School’s leadership, the Seattle district removed the school’s principal, Anitra Jones, on Monday and transferred her to its central office.The transfer, which the district described as “ a temporary assignment,” comes nearly a month after a March 6 School Board meeting when some parents and staff began a public pressure campaign to oust Jones. They described an “unsafe” environment at the South Seattle school that had created ...

After years of parent and staff complaints about Rainier View Elementary School’s leadership, the Seattle district removed the school’s principal, Anitra Jones, on Monday and transferred her to its central office.

The transfer, which the district described as “ a temporary assignment,” comes nearly a month after a March 6 School Board meeting when some parents and staff began a public pressure campaign to oust Jones. They described an “unsafe” environment at the South Seattle school that had created a “culture of fear and anxiety.” The school’s PTSA had also called for Jones’ immediate removal or for her to be put on leave as the district investigates the complaints.

It also followed several grievances filed by the Seattle Education Association on behalf of some of its members. The school’s PTSA also filed complaints to Seattle Public Schools, the state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington, in which the PTSA alleged disproportionate discipline practices at the school fell heavily on Black and brown students, as well as religious discrimination, failure to fulfill students’ individualized education plans, and misuse of Title 1 funds.

“I’m a little relieved, and I am a little surprised,” said Hala Mana’o, the school’s PTSA president, who said the group was still hearing “heartbreaking” experiences from families connected to the school. “But I am hoping that it’s a step toward a place where we all want to go. Let’s move forward …. Let’s be curious about investigating the experiences of people.”

The district announced Jones’ new assignment in an email to parents on Monday, days after it said it planned to hire an independent “reviewer” to look into the school’s practices. Some parents said the earlier announcement did not address their concerns and they questioned why Jones was still in charge while a review was underway.

Jones was not in school Monday, said Beverly Redmond, the district’s chief of staff and spokeswoman.

Jo Lute-Ervin, a former Rainier View teacher and principal at Kimball Elementary School, will fill in for Jones as the substitute principal this week.

“This temporary change does not indicate that SPS has confirmed any wrongdoing by Principal Jones,” according to the district’s email. “The change is meant to foster peace in the school community. Our aim is to ensure that any concerns at Rainier View can be reviewed objectively without distractions.”

Jones has said that she planned to respond publicly after the school district completes its process. But in a message to the school community on Friday, she said the stories were “outlandish.”

“There is more than one side to every story,” she said. “The first sounds true, until you hear the other side of the story. I ask for your patience.”

The district used careful wording to describe what it plans to do at the 200-student elementary, opting to use the word review rather than investigation.

“We termed it a review of the practices of the school, not necessarily an investigation,” Redmond said. “My reason for doing that is really wanting to make sure we have something, that if we needed to open an investigation it would be as a result of a review.”

Asked whether the review would go beyond Rainier View and include district employees at the central office and other departments who interacted with the parents, staff and families who had complained over several years, Redmond said, “We will follow that information to where it’s going to lead us. We are going to look at things related to Rainier View and its practices.”

In response to criticism, the district also added a new hourlong evening session on Tuesday for families to meet with district officials, including Superintendent Brent Jones, about their experiences. The new session will run from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The two earlier sessions are scheduled from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Families will get an update on the scope of the review at the meetings.

The district also plans to survey students and families this week about their experiences at the school. A meeting for staff members will be announced before spring break, Redmond said.

Redmond said she hopes that the review will wrap up by the end of the school year.

Some of the complaints about the school and its principal date back years. Former teachers say high turnover meant that nonteaching staff frequently filled in as substitute teachers at the expense of their core duties. Others said they got low evaluation scores after questioning Jones. Members of the PTSA said the relationship with Jones had devolved to the point where they were not allowed to meet on campus. Parents said students were pulled out of class for disciplinary infractions and made to sit in the principal’s office without academic support.

Jones has been lauded for her leadership during her tenure at Rainier View. The Seattle Alliance for Education gave her the Thomas B. Foster Award for Excellence in 2018 for “closing opportunity gaps.” The Puget Sound Educational Service District also named Rainier View a “School of Distinction” in 2016.

Jones will work with the deputy superintendent of academics while assigned to the central office, said Redmond, who added that she did not yet know what Jones’ duties might include. Jones will continue to be paid her principal’s salary, Redmond said.

Mana’o said he would have preferred that Jones be placed in a position that did not require frequent interaction with the public.

“I hope that at the center of all of these things is the voices and experiences of our families and our teachers, as well as the actions of this administrator,” he said. “That’s at the core of this … The district has to work on the engagement with the community.”

Denisa R. Superville: 206-464-8216 or dsuperville@seattletimes.com; Denisa R. Superville covers K-12 education at The Seattle Times.

Seahawks add depth to receiver and return game with Laviska Shenault Jr.

After the NFL passed a new kickoff format at the league meetings last week, Seahawks president of football operations John Schneider said the team would look at adding some returners.That might be why it was announced Tuesday that they signed free-agent receiver Laviska Shenault Jr. His agent, David Canter, reported the signing on social media.Shenault, who played collegiately at Colorado, was a second-round pick of Jacksonv...

After the NFL passed a new kickoff format at the league meetings last week, Seahawks president of football operations John Schneider said the team would look at adding some returners.

That might be why it was announced Tuesday that they signed free-agent receiver Laviska Shenault Jr. His agent, David Canter, reported the signing on social media.

Shenault, who played collegiately at Colorado, was a second-round pick of Jacksonville in 2020 at 42 overall. After playing two seasons there he spent the last two seasons in Carolina.

He has 158 receptions for 1,551 yards and six touchdowns in 51 NFL games but also handled some kickoff-return duties with the Panthers the last two seasons — six for 197 yards in 2023 and three for 82 in 2022.

That background means the Seahawks could view him as contender as a depth receiver and a kickoff returner, potentially competing with — if not working alongside — 2021 second-round pick Dee Eskridge as Seattle tries to navigate how to best utilize the NFL’s new kickoff rules.

Shenault reportedly signed a one-year veteran minimum contract that is fully guaranteed, according to NFL writer Aaron Wilson.

The new format, approved on a one-year trail basis for the 2024 season, allows for two returners inside a target zone from the 20-yard-line to the goal line. Defenders will be stationed at the opposing 40 — with blockers lined up at the 35 — and cannot move until the kick is received. The thought is that the new format will lead to an increase in returns, and a renewed emphasis on the value of returners.

On the day the new format was approved, Schneider said he was already on the phone with the agents of some free agents who could be prospective returners.

“It will be important to have returners that can hit it up in there pretty dang quick because it’s going to be a bang, bang play,” Schneider said last week during his weekly appearance on Seattle Sports 710.

Even with the re-signing of Eskridge to a new one-year contract that replaced the final year of his four-year rookie deal, the Seahawks were going to need to add some returners after seeing DeeJay Dallas sign as a free agent with Arizona.

Dallas was their primary returner last season with 17 kickoff returns for 440 yards. Eskridge had eight for 24 yards including a 66-yarder against the 49ers — the longest of the season for the Seahawks — before suffering a rib injury and being placed on injured reserve.

The Seahawks may be taking a flyer on a player who entered the league as the ninth receiver taken in the 2020 draft.

Shenault, listed at 6-foot-1, 220 pounds, set a career high with 63 receptions for 619 yards with the Jaguars in 2021. He was traded before the 2022 season to Carolina for a 2023 seventh-round pick and a 2024 sixth-rounder.

He became a free agent following the 2023 season in which he played just eight games because of an ankle injury, with 10 receptions for 60 yards.

Shenault becomes the ninth receiver on the Seahawks’ roster joining Eskridge, Tyler Lockett, DK Metcalf, Jaxon Smith-Njigba, Dareke Young, Jake Bobo, Easop Winston Jr. and Cody White.

The Seahawks will begin their voluntary offseason program on Monday, the first time the team will gather as a whole under new coach Mike Macdonald, who replaced Pete Carroll.

Bob Condotta: 206-515-5699 or bcondotta@seattletimes.com; Bob Condotta covers the Seahawks for the Seattle Times. He provides daily coverage of the team throughout the year.

Mabuhay! SEA Welcomes Announcement of Nonstop Service to Manila on Philippine Airlines

Flights on the long-awaited new route are available starting October 2, 2024The Port of Seattle welcomes Philippine Airlines’ announcement of upcoming nonstop service between Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) and Ninoy Aquino International Airport (MNL) in Manila, Philippines. Starting in October, SEA passengers will have three flight options per week to travel directly to the archipelagic nation.“Washington state is home to the country’s fourth-largest Filipino population. For over 100 years, Filipin...

Flights on the long-awaited new route are available starting October 2, 2024

The Port of Seattle welcomes Philippine Airlines’ announcement of upcoming nonstop service between Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) and Ninoy Aquino International Airport (MNL) in Manila, Philippines. Starting in October, SEA passengers will have three flight options per week to travel directly to the archipelagic nation.

“Washington state is home to the country’s fourth-largest Filipino population. For over 100 years, Filipinos have contributed to the region’s arts, business, and political leadership,” said Port of Seattle Commission Vice President Toshiko Hasegawa. “Nonstop service to Manila has long been one of our most frequently requested routes, and we’re thrilled that this new flight will not only serve the Puget Sound’s Filipino community but anyone who is interested in exploring the rich history, beauty, and hospitality of the Philippines.”

The Philippines is this region’s largest unserved international market, and the nonstop flight on Philippine Airlines — also known as PAL — will serve the tens of thousands of travelers who journey to the Philippines each year, whether it’s to visit friends and relatives or to explore the country’s growing tourism scene.

“We’ve been looking forward to this announcement for some time and are excited to welcome Philippine Airlines to our region,” said Lance Lyttle, Managing Director of the Port’s Aviation Division. “This new direct route will offer valuable economic impact to our region and open up opportunities for outbound travelers visiting the Philippines and beyond, including Seattle’s Sister City, Cebu, Philippines. It will also serve as an important connector between our two communities for business and leisure travel.”

“Philippine Airlines is happy to say, ‘Mabuhay, Seattle!’ We are proud to welcome Seattle to our growing U.S. route network,” said PAL President and Chief Operating Officer Captain Stanley K. Ng. “Our Manila – Seattle – Manila flights give us a valuable opportunity to promote our beautiful island country as a flourishing tourist and business destination for American travelers. We also look forward to serving Filipinos who hope to reunite with family members or experience new travel adventures in the vibrant U.S. Pacific Northwest.”

SEA is PAL’s eighth North American destination. Passengers traveling to MNL on the airline’s Boeing 777-300ER aircraft can also connect to PAL’s regional network, including cities like Cebu, Davao, Bangkok, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Kuala Lumpur. For more information, read PAL’s latest announcement.

Flight details

The new route to MNL begins on October 2, 2024, and will operate three times a week, on Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday:

Route Days Depart Arrivals Flight No.
SEA to MNL Wed, Fri, Sun 11:40pm 4:45am (+2 day) PR125
MNL to SEA Wed, Fri, Sun 10:40pm 7:15pm PR124

International service at SEA

SEA currently offers 47 services to 31 international destinations on 25 different airlines. This is the sixth new international service announced for 2024 after Alaska Airlines to Toronto starting in May; Lufthansa to Munich starting in May; Delta Air Lines to Taipei starting in June; China Airlines to Taipei starting in July; and STARLUX Airlines to Taipei starting in August. Visit SEA’s International Travel page for more tips and information on navigating SEA and the International Arrivals Facility.

About Philippine Airlines

Philippine Airlines (PAL) is the Philippines’ flag carrier and only full-service network airline, as well as the first commercial airline in Asia. PAL's fleet of Boeing, Airbus, and De Havilland aircraft operate scheduled nonstop flights out of hubs in Manila, Cebu, Clark, and Davao to 33 destinations in the Philippines and 39 destinations in Asia, North America, Australia, and the Middle East. Known for its hallmark heartwarming and gracious Filipino service, PAL also supports the global economy through air cargo and charter services, while serving the travel needs of overseas Filipinos as well as businesspeople, tourists, and families from all over the world.

Contact:

Perry Cooper | SEA Airport (206) 787-4923 | cooper.p@portseattle.org

Analysis: Five storylines to watch as UW football spring practices begin

A lot has changed since the Husky football team last took the field.Michael Penix Jr. and 20 other starters from the team which won the last Pac-12 football title, the 2023 Sugar Bowl and went to the College Football Playoff championship game have departed. Former UW coach Kalen DeBoer headed south to replace Nick Saban at Alabama, while Jedd Fisch joined Washington from former conference rival Arizona. UW is headed to a new conference for the first time in more than a century.And The Seattle Times even switched beat writers....

A lot has changed since the Husky football team last took the field.

Michael Penix Jr. and 20 other starters from the team which won the last Pac-12 football title, the 2023 Sugar Bowl and went to the College Football Playoff championship game have departed. Former UW coach Kalen DeBoer headed south to replace Nick Saban at Alabama, while Jedd Fisch joined Washington from former conference rival Arizona. UW is headed to a new conference for the first time in more than a century.

And The Seattle Times even switched beat writers.

Despite all the changes, some things remain consistent. As the cherry blossoms bloom in the quad and false spring baits California transplants to believe summer is already here, Washington football returns for spring practice at 5 p.m. Wednesday.

Here are five storylines for Washington fans to keep track of as the Jedd Fisch era officially begins on Montlake:

Speaking during a media availability session on March 27, Washington offensive coordinator Brennan Carroll said his first question to the offensive-line group was “Who plays center?”

When half of the group raised their hands, Carroll corrected them, saying “Everybody put your hands up. You’re all playing center.”

Yet personnel questions certainly linger over the offensive line entering 8spring camp. All five members of the group which won the 2023 Joe Moore Award as the best offensive-line unit in the country — Troy Fautanu, Julius Buelow, Parker Brailsford, Nate Kalepo and Roger Rosengarten — departed for the NFL Draft or other opportunities.

Washington enters the spring with just 11 scholarship offensive linemen. Two of them, true freshmen Davit Boyajyan and Justin Hylkema, won’t be on campus until the fall.

So in reality, Washington will have nine offensive linemen available this spring. Redshirt freshmen Kahlee Tafai, Soane Faasolo, Elishah Jackett and true freshmen Paki Finau and Michael Watkins have zero on-field college experience. Redshirt freshman Zachary Henning played twice in 2023 against Michigan State and California.

Junior Gaard Memmelaar missed the entire 2023 season because of injury. He played in four games during the 2022 season. Sophomore Landen Hatchett played in nine games as a true freshman, making him the most experienced returning member of Washington’s offensive-line group. The Huskies also landed former San Diego State transfer Drew Azzopardi, who started six games at right tackle for the Aztecs during the past campaign and has played in 15 career games.

Carroll, who coaches offensive linemen along with his offensive-coordinator duties, clearly has his job cut out for him. Washington also has a chance to add more experience to its front five during the spring transfer portal which opens April 15. But it will be interesting to see how the line develops and who grabs an early claim to a starting spot this spring.

Cameron Davis probably wasn’t expecting to be back on Montlake for the 2024 season a year ago.

The former four-star running back from Upland, Calif., experienced the best season of his career in 2022 under DeBoer, rushing for 522 yards on 107 attempts with 13 touchdowns while splitting carries with Wayne Taulapapa. He also hauled in 19 catches for 137 yards. Davis looked set to battle former Mississippi State transfer Dillon Johnson for the lead-back role in 2023.

However, an injury suffered in fall camp forced Davis out for the entire 2023 season. Johnson seized the starting role, rushed for more than 1,000 yards and 16 touchdowns as UW rolled to a CFP championship game appearance and declared for the NFL Draft.

Davis, now healthy, returns to a crowded running-back room. Former Arizona transfer Jonah Coleman was an honorable mention All-Pac-12 selection in 2023, while true freshman and Wildcat early enrollee Adam Mohammed also joined the Huskies in the offseason. Additionally, 2023 contributors Tybo Rogers, Sam Adams II and Daniyel Ngata all return.

Spring will be important for Davis to reestablish himself atop Washington’s running back depth chart and provides an opportunity to see how his recovery has gone entering his sixth season of college football.

Fisch wasn’t able to bring all his Arizona standouts to Seattle — missing out on players like quarterback Noah Fifita and wide receiver Tetairoa McMillan, who both chose to stay in Tucson — but several former Wildcats will make the move north.

Coleman is perhaps the most notable. He rushed for 871 yards and five touchdowns as a sophomore in 2023, while adding 25 catches for 283 yards and a trip to the end zone through the air.

He’s not the only Arizona contributor Fisch was able to lure to Montlake, however, as UW also added cornerback Ephesians Prysock. Another 2023 All-Pac-12 honorable mention, he had 61 tackles, seven passes defended and an interception while playing in 13 games across from second-team All-Pac-12 cornerback Tacario Davis. Prysock and returning cornerback Elijah Jackson give Washington some experience on the defensive perimeter heading into the spring.

Two other former Arizona players can be found on the defensive line. Junior Russell Davis II recorded 16 tackles in 2023, including 5.5 tackles for loss and 3.5 sacks, while Isaiah Ward added 30 tackles and four sacks.

Other Arizona transfers like cornerback Jordan Shaw or wide receiver Audric Harris either never played for Arizona because they were transferring from somewhere else like Shaw or were true freshmen who enrolled early at Arizona and therefore had to enter the transfer portal instead of simply being released from their national letters of intent like Harris.

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One place Washington knows it has experience is at quarterback. The Huskies were able to keep fifth-year signal caller Will Rogers, who’d initially transferred to Washington from Mississippi State to play for DeBoer.

Rogers, the all-time Southeastern Conference leader in pass completions and completion percentage, played 43 games for the Bulldogs across four seasons. His experience should be a massive boost, and Rogers is the obvious front-runner to start for Washington in 2024.

He also has a chance to help set Washington up for the future. Rogers is one of three scholarship quarterbacks on the roster. The other two — 247Sports composite four-star prospects Demond Williams Jr. and Dermaricus Davis — are true freshmen, and Rogers can mentor them to potentially succeed him in 2025.

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Washington is struggling for depth and experience at a number of spots, but the Huskies are particularly thin at safety. Starting safety Dominique Hampton declared for the draft, while Asa Turner transferred to Florida.

Senior Kamren Fabiculanan returns with the most experience. He played in 12 games, making 26 tackles, including three for a loss, and grabbed two interceptions while mostly playing as a nickel, but is now listed as a safety.

Behind Fabiculanan, the group is fairly untested. Junior Makell Esteen played in 14 games as a sophomore and made 19 tackles. He also made a start against Stanford at the peak of Washington’s secondary injury crisis during the past season. Sophomore Tristan Dunn played in all 15 games, mostly on special teams. Redshirt freshman Vincent Holmes, who played four games as a safety during his true-freshman season in 2023, is switching to offense and will play wide receiver.

Fisch was able to hold onto true freshman Peyton Waters, a 247Sports composite four-star prospect who briefly entered the transfer portal. He will participate in spring practices. However, fellow true freshmen Paul Mencke Jr. and Rahim Wright II will not, meaning new Washington safeties coach Vinnie Sunseri only has four scholarship safeties this spring.

Andy Yamashita: ayamashita@seattletimes.com; Seattle Times staff reporter Andy Yamashita covers UW football.

Good Shepherd Center in Wallingford once served as a ‘school for wayward girls’

WHEN IT WAS built in 1907, the Home of the Good Shepherd in Wallingford was an Italianate palace commissioned by the Catholic Church as a “school for wayward girls” operated by nuns known as the order of the Good Shepherd. Today, the property is a peaceful edifice behind high hedges, looking both dignified and perhaps romantically haunted, as such old institutions are meant to be.In truth, the Home of the Good Shepherd was indeed a school but also, to be frank, a curious institution sometimes known as a “Magdalene La...

WHEN IT WAS built in 1907, the Home of the Good Shepherd in Wallingford was an Italianate palace commissioned by the Catholic Church as a “school for wayward girls” operated by nuns known as the order of the Good Shepherd. Today, the property is a peaceful edifice behind high hedges, looking both dignified and perhaps romantically haunted, as such old institutions are meant to be.

In truth, the Home of the Good Shepherd was indeed a school but also, to be frank, a curious institution sometimes known as a “Magdalene Laundry.” The Order of the Good Shepherd was one of five monastic female orders that ran such schools, which in later years have come under fire (often to the point of lawsuits) in Ireland; France; the Netherlands; and, increasingly, the United States, which had 38 such institutions of its own. What was considered “wayward” in the 1900s could have been anything from being a tomboy, to being “promiscuous,” or inconveniently pregnant, or an orphan, or born illegitimately or even the victim of abuse. Any could lead to being shut up behind opaque walls and barred windows, and denied contact with the outside (even their personal letters were screened) while they were, in theory, given an education.

1907: Year the building was established.

1908: Year the laundry began operation.

1975: Year the property was sold to the city.

1985: Year the property was designated a city landmark.

170-180: Number of “wayward girls” housed at a time at the Home of the Good Shepherd School.

11: Size of the property, in acres.

They were called “Magadalene Laundries” because the orders also operated commercial laundries on-site (the site of the laundry at the Good Shepherd Center is now a storage building), where the occupants worked as unpaid labor in order to “learn useful skills” or theoretically offset their tuition. There were additional vocational courses and activities — there was even a pool, built in the 1950s — but it is impossible to know how much of what went on was in some way useful and stabilizing, and what was oppressive, mostly because they were silenced until they were often unceremoniously shunted back into the world upon reaching adulthood. Among the objections former “students” level against these schools was that they actually were taught little of how to do anything except … laundry.

Over time, the changes of the early 20th century reached even the halls of the Home of the Good Shepherd; rules were loosened at the school; feminism changed the nature of what was considered “wayward”; and the laundry fell out of favor, until, in 1973, the school was shuttered (the laundry closed in 1970). In 1975, the sisters sold the building to the city of Seattle, which converted it into a community center, and it began its second, brighter life.

Historic Seattle maintains the building itself; it is rented out to several local nonprofits, with the bulk of the property used by the Meridian School, a private elementary school. The chapel upstairs, with its stained-glass windows, is a haven of peace, and hosts musical performances curated by an organization called NonSequitur, which presents “adventurous and experimental” musical events in the space.

The order of the day these days at the Good Shepherd Center (as it is now called) appears to be growing things. The old orchard still sprawls all over the property, and when pulling up to the front driveway, one is immediately struck by strange, swirling white piping around the tops of the old apple trees. That looks like modern art or a roller coaster for mice, but is actually an entirely utilitarian framework meant to keep the birds off the branches during fruiting season. One side of the building is dominated by an impressive P-patch operated by Seattle’s own gardening mages, Tilth, another tenant of the Good Shepherd Center. A city-owned playground behind the building features a child-size wonderland of slides and climbing structures, and all around the perimeter wall are whimsical statues — a dragon, a hot-air balloon, a raven — that reference classic literature to feed the naturally florid childhood imagination of students like those of the Meridian grammar school.

The Order’s original statue of Jesus — complete with lamb — still looks down over the entrance. The expression on the statue’s face seems far less mournful there now, with the gleeful shrieks of playing children bouncing around the stone walls, than it might have when the building was commissioned.

Any building this old is credited with ghosts, and naturally tales of phantasmic nuns or invisible schoolgirls attach themselves to the place, but on sunny days, light shines in through the stained glass and clears the shadows out of the corners.

Tantri Wija is a Seattle-based freelance writer. Reach her at scratchtheblog.com. Dean Rutz is a Seattle Times staff photographer: drutz@seattletimes.com.

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