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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in St. Cloud, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim St. Cloud, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in St. Cloud, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in St. Cloud, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in St. Cloud, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in St. Cloud, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in St. Cloud, MN

St. Cloud Times announces 2023 boys soccer player of the year and all-area teams

SAINT CLOUD – For the third year in a row St. Cloud Tech and St. Cloud Cathedral made it to the Class 2A and Class A boys soccer tournaments and this year the Tigers and Crusaders advanced to the final four.Cathedral managed to win its third-place game, the best the team has ever finished, but Tech lost to DeLaSalle 3-1 after giving up a a halftime lead.Sartell-St. Stephen was another local team that had high hopes in Class 3A, even beating St. Cloud Tech days before the Section 8-3A tournament, but the Sab...

SAINT CLOUD – For the third year in a row St. Cloud Tech and St. Cloud Cathedral made it to the Class 2A and Class A boys soccer tournaments and this year the Tigers and Crusaders advanced to the final four.

Cathedral managed to win its third-place game, the best the team has ever finished, but Tech lost to DeLaSalle 3-1 after giving up a a halftime lead.

Sartell-St. Stephen was another local team that had high hopes in Class 3A, even beating St. Cloud Tech days before the Section 8-3A tournament, but the Sabres lost 2-1 in the section championship to St. Michael-Albertville (9-11).

Sartell, Tech and other schools in central Minnesota all have players on the 2023 St. Cloud Times all-area teams, but Cathedral placed the most athletes on the list with eight. Senior Jacob Plante secured the 2023 player of the year as captain of the Crusaders’ elite defense.

The fall 2023 all-area teams were picked from student athletes who competed for Apollo (13-5-1), Cathedral (21-1), ROCORI (6-9-2), Sartell (13-2-3), Sauk Rapids-Rice (5-10), and Tech (9-9-3).

Selections were made based on statistics, recommendations from coaches and insights from Times staff who covered the various sports and teams this season. The 2023 SC Times all-area soccer teams are made up of 11 players. First and second teams have two forwards, five midfielders, three defenders and one goalie as listed in the teams’ official rosters. Many were used around the field, as their statistics show.

Besides the player of the year, selections are listed in alphabetical order.

Cathedral wins third place at state:St. Cloud Cathedral wins third place in state soccer tournament, Tech places fourth

Tech beats Apollo on penalties in 'ship:St. Cloud Tech and Cathedral win section championships, other local teams advance in semis

First team all-area:

Player of the year: Jacob Plante, Cathedral senior defender

Plante and the Crusaders allowed a school record-low four goals this season, including in six postseason games. Cathedral won 20 straight games until its 1-0 loss to Pine Island/Zumbrota-Mazeppa (15-3-2) on Nov. 1 in the Class A semifinal game in U.S. Bank stadium. That’s 18 shutouts counting the team’s 1-0 third place win over Holy Family (13-5-3) the day after its only loss. This year was Cathedral’s 13th consecutive conference win and third straight trip to state.

For his play, Plante was one of four finalists for Class A Mr. Soccer, an honor won by Cooper Olson of Class A champion St. Paul Academy (14-4-3). Scoring three goals and assisting five over the season, Plante was named first team all-state, all-Granite Ridge Conference and was on the state tournament team.

Plante was captain of Cathedral’s record-setting defense, but he had help on the back line from seniors Elias Drong and Philip O’Neal and sophomore Griffin Sturm. O’Neal and Sturm just missed out on the all-area teams.

Kader Abdi, Apollo senior defender

In the Section 8-2A championship Apollo played Tech all the way to a 0-0 draw after overtime. The Eagles had beaten the Tigers 3-0 earlier in the season but lost the chance to compete at state in the section final four made penalty kicks to three.

Abdi was a part of the defense that held Tech to zero goals in both games, two of nine Eagle shutouts this season. On offense the senior had 5 goals and 3 assists. Apollo finished third in the CLC behind Sartell and Willmar with a 6-3-1 conference record.

Caleb Campina, Tech senior defender

Cathedral entered the tournament undefeated, but Tech won four straight postseason games to reach the semifinal. The Tigers lost their last three regular season games and three of the four postseason wins were by a one-goal margin, including the win over Apollo and the state quarterfinal Oct. 25 against Cloquet/Esko/Carlton (15-3). Campina scored against CEC and against DeLaSalle in the state tourney, earning a spot on the all-tournament team.

Listed in every position but keeper, Campina patrolled the length of the pitch, managing the middle of the field. He ranged far enough to score 17 goals and assist three, but his biggest contribution may have been his leadership, according to coach Dan Stoterau.

“Caleb is fiercely focused and is one of the finest finishers I've seen at Tech,” Stoterau said “He is a great leader through his positive attitude and effort and 'never give up' demeanor. He loves soccer and he sure plays like it.”

Campina was named all-CLC.

Marcus Congdon, Sartell senior forward

Congdon was an assist merchant for Sartell this season, dealing out 18 passes to teammates who scored. He was fifth in the state in assists across all three classes and also had 10 goals. Congdon was named to the Class 3A all-state second team in addition to the all-conference team.

The Sabres’ only two losses came at the hands of St. Michael-Albertville, including in the Section 8-3A championship. Sartell was 7-0-2 in the CLC and won the conference, the only two blemishes coming on the road against second and third place teams Willmar and Tech.

Seth Davidson, Sartell junior midfielder

Davidson was on the receiving end of many of Congdon’s assists. He led Sartell in goals with 18, but Davidson also dished 11 assists. The junior had a hat trick to open the season Aug. 24 in a 5-0 win over Big Lake and he had three goals and an assist late in the season in a 4-1 revenge win over Tech.

In 2023 Davidson earned all-conference honors.

Cole Hwang, Cathedral senior midfielder

Hwang was another essential piece to Cathedral’s three straight state appearances. He had nine goals and four assists this year in addition to playing back with the Crusaders’ suffocating defense. Hwang helped get scoring started in the Section 8-1A championship by assisting teammate Jack Stang’s opening goal. Two of Hwang’s goals came in the postseason.

Abdirahman Isse, Apollo senior midfielder

Having scored 17 goals this season and assisted 10, Isse was named to the 2023 all-state first team despite missing out on the state tournament. Isse was also first team all-conference with teammates Carl Shobe, Imran Mohamed and Landon Hale.

Jacob Oliver, Cathedral sophomore midfielder

Oliver was one of Minnesota’s most prolific scorers this season, netting 29 goals – third among players in all classes. He also had 14 assists, leading Cathedral’s lineup in points. The sophomore was rewarded with an all-state second team nomination in addition to all GRC and state tournament recognitions. For the all-tournament nod, Oliver scored and had an assist in the tournament-opening win Oct. 25 against Duluth Marshall (13-4-2).

Oliver was the only underclassman selected to the all-area team this season.

Kyan Rieder, Sartell senior goalie

From his position in net Rieder literally had his hands in all of Sartell's five shutout wins. The senior captain had 129 saves this year and only allowed 19 goals in 18 games. Rieder was one of five all-conference Sabres in their undefeated CLC campaign.

Jack Stang, Cathedral junior forward

Stang had 26 goals this season, sixth most in the state. He drew a lot of coverage, including a double team in the fateful semifinal. Still, the junior managed to tie for the 10th most assists this season by players in any class with 15. One of those assists went to senior Blake Newiger, who scored the only goal in the third-place game against Holy Family.

Stang made the all-state first team with Plante and was also all-GRC and all-state tournament.

Connor Stockman, Cathedral junior midfielder

Stockman was another goal-happy midfielder out of Cathedral. He had 13 this season with seven assists, good for an all-conference honorable mention selection.

“A junior with great footwork and a great left and right foot,” coach Alex Hess said. “He can strike the ball from anywhere and it will be dangerous.”

Second team all-area:

Omar Ali, Tech senior midfielder

Anthony Colatrella, Sartell senior defender

Elias Drong, Cathedral senior defender

Abdiwahab Gedi, Tech senior defender

Hamdi Hassan, Apollo senior midfielder

Noah Henderson, Cathedral junior goalie

Blake Newiger, Cathedral senior midfielder

Baylor Stebbins, Sartell senior midfielder

Contact reporter Reid Glenn at rglenn@gannett.com.

Omaha hockey to rely on goalkeeper Simon Latkoczy in weekend series vs. St. Cloud State

Sophomore goalie Simon Latkoczy is coming off his first shutout of the season entering home games Friday and Saturday at Baxter Arena against first-place St. Cloud State. The 15th-ranked Huskies are 8-5-1 overall and 6-0 in the NCHC.Latkoczy, a native of Slovakia, earned his nickname because of his quickness. He is 6-3-1 with a 2.45 goals-against average.The 9-4-1 Mavericks are 3-3 in the league and sit in fifth place with seven points. UNO split a pair of games last weekend at Minnesota Duluth but are coming off a 1-0 overtime...

Sophomore goalie Simon Latkoczy is coming off his first shutout of the season entering home games Friday and Saturday at Baxter Arena against first-place St. Cloud State. The 15th-ranked Huskies are 8-5-1 overall and 6-0 in the NCHC.

Latkoczy, a native of Slovakia, earned his nickname because of his quickness. He is 6-3-1 with a 2.45 goals-against average.

The 9-4-1 Mavericks are 3-3 in the league and sit in fifth place with seven points. UNO split a pair of games last weekend at Minnesota Duluth but are coming off a 1-0 overtime victory.

Jack Randl scored the winning goal while Latkoczy steered aside 29 shots and was named the NCHC goaltender of the week. He made 53 saves in the two games against the Bulldogs.

“I thought both team’s goalies were excellent (Saturday) night,” Omaha coach Mike Gabinet said. “Anytime you’re in a match like that and you get a shutout, you know that you’ve had a heck of a game.”

Latkoczy made an immediate impact last season as a freshman, starting 19 games and posting a 2.32 goals-against average. He had two shutouts and a save percentage of .919.

Gabinet said he’s been even better this year with the help of goaltending coach Peter Aubry, who joined the team in July.

“Simon is a competitor and pretty consistent in his mental approach,” the coach said. “Pete also has done a great job, just fine tuning a couple of things technically.”

Gabinet said it’s important not to overlook the play of the goalies on a daily basis.

“I think they can be forgotten about a little bit if you don’t have a goalie background,” he said. “You don’t talk to them as consistently as a defenseman or a forward, so that’s where Pete has really helped.”

Latkoczy said Aubry has indeed helped him hone his game.

“He has experience from the NHL and the AHL and he knows a lot of stuff,” he said. “He has a lot of different opinions than I had but we found a way together and I’m enjoying him.”

Latkoczy credited his teammates for contributing to Saturday night’s shutout.

“The guys helped me a lot,” he said. “They helped clear the rebounds and we were able to shut them down.”

Latkoczy said taking care of the little things has helped him improve this season.

“It’s all about the small details,” he said. “It’s not going to be huge improvements but over the long term, it’s those small things that help you keep getting better and better.”

He added that he does a lot of mental preparation before games.

“I do things every day and every night,” he said. “I do some meditation and work on my confidence through visualization.”

The Mavs are hoping to finish the first half of the season on a positive note. After Saturday’s game, they’ll take a 27-day break for Christmas.

For Latkoczy, that means a trip home to Slovakia.

“I’m excited for the break and to see my friends and family,” he said. “I left home when I was 17 so it’s always nice to go back.”

NOTES: Fans are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy Saturday night for the Toys for Tots campaign … The Huskies, coming off a bye week, are coached by Brett Larson … After this weekend, UNO’s next game will be Jan. 5 at the Desert Classic in Arizona … The teams played twice last season and split a pair of 6-2 decisions in Omaha … St. Cloud leads the all-time series 28-16-2 … The Mavs are 7-0 in one-goal games … Gabinet said forwards Matt Miller and Zach Urdahl probably will be sidelined by injury this weekend … Forward Ty Mueller leads Omaha in scoring with five goals and six assists … Veeti Miettinen is the top scorer for the Huskies with 10 goals and four assists.

Gophers Travel to St. Cloud for Top-10 Meeting With Huskies

MINNEAPOLIS -- The No. 2 ranked Golden Gopher women's hockey team (13-2-0) is set to travel to St. Cloud, Minn. for a mid-week meeting with the No. 8 Huskies (12-5-0) at Herb Brooks National Hockey Center on Tuesday at 6:00 p.m.Last Time Out The Maroon and Gold swept Bemidji State behind an explosion of offense, scoring 18 goals in two games at Ridder Arena on Dec. 1 and Dec. 2. The Gophers saw four multi-goal games this past weekend, including ...

MINNEAPOLIS -- The No. 2 ranked Golden Gopher women's hockey team (13-2-0) is set to travel to St. Cloud, Minn. for a mid-week meeting with the No. 8 Huskies (12-5-0) at Herb Brooks National Hockey Center on Tuesday at 6:00 p.m.

Last Time Out The Maroon and Gold swept Bemidji State behind an explosion of offense, scoring 18 goals in two games at Ridder Arena on Dec. 1 and Dec. 2. The Gophers saw four multi-goal games this past weekend, including Abbey Murphy scoring two in each of the two wins. Six different Gophers scored a goal in Minnesota's 9-2 win on Friday, while seven different players scored a goal on Saturday.

Rematch with the Huskies Minnesota and St. Cloud State faced off on Oct. 17 at Ridder Arena, a tightly-contested game that saw the Gophers prevail by a score of 2-1. Entering Tuesday's meeting, Minnesota has won eight games in a row, while St. Cloud State recently beat No. 1 Ohio State.

Scouting the Huskies St. Cloud State enters Tuesday's game ranked No. 8 in the nation by USCHO, having won three of their previous four games. Klara Hymlarova leads the Huskies in goals scored with six, followed by CC Bowlby and Emma Gentry, who each have scored five. Goaltender Sanni Ahola holds a record of 6-1 so far this season, including five shutouts.

Multiple Gopher Contributors The Maroon and Gold have had various players make an impact to start the year. Redshirt junior Abbey Murphy has led the scoring charge, scoring 19 goals in 15 games. Junior Ella Huber has registered 20 points in the first 15 games (8g, 12a). Freshman Ava Lindsay has scored seven times, stepping up on the Gophers' offensive attack. Fellow freshman Emma Kreisz has scored three goals and added 10 assists this season. A. Lindsay and Kreisz, often linemates, have flashed tremendous chemistry in their first year with the Gophers. Nelli Laitinen has found the back of the net five times, becoming a major contributor for the Maroon and Gold in her sophomore campaign.

Murphy MagicAbbey Murphy was named WCHA Forward of the Week on Nov. 27 following her performance in D.C. Just three days later, she was named WCHA Forward of the Month. Murphy compiled eight points against Bemidji State on Dec. 1 & 2, scoring four goals and adding four assists.

Stout Goaltending Goaltender Skylar Vetter set the program record with 52 saves against Ohio State on Oct. 27, beating the previous record of 51 set by Noora Raty. Vetter has recorded two shutouts so far this season. Fifth-year transfer Lucy Morgan has also recorded a shutout this season, providing the Gophers high-quality depth this season. Morgan and Vetter allowed just three goals combined in wins against Bemidji State on Dec. 1 & 2.

Defense Acting as an Anchor The Gophers' three fifth-years -- Taylor Stewart, Madeline Wethington and Solveig Neunzert -- have been key pieces to a strong Minnesota defense this season. They've allowed one or zero goals in 13 of 15 games this season. Nelli Laitinen has taken a step forward in her sophomore season, scoring five goals and assisting six goals in 15 games.

Captains Leading the Way Junior Peyton Hemp was named team captain this fall for the first time in her career, while Madeline Wethington, Abbey Murphy and Ella Huber were named assistant captains, also the first time they've worn a letter. All three of the Gopher leaders have made their presence felt thus far in 2023-24, with Murphy scoring 19 goals, Huber registering 20 points, Hemp scoring six goals and assisting eight times, and M. Wethington scoring two goals and assisting six goals.

Newcomers Making an Impact Freshman Ava Lindsay has not only scored seven goals so far, but made timely plays. She registered a five-point weekend against Bemidji State on Dec. 1 & 2. Fellow freshman Emma Kreisz has also given Minnesota a boost, recording three points against the Beavers. Fifth-year transfers Taylor Stewart and Solveig Neunzert have also played substantial roles on Minnesota's defense.

Scoring Milestones on the Horizon After adding 31 points in the first 15 games, Abbey Murphy now sits at 99 career points (56g, 43a), just one point away from the century mark. Madeline Wethington also added to her pursuit of 100 career points by scoring two goals and six assists so far this year. She now sits at 85 career points (24g, 61a). Peyton Hemp sits at 74 career points (34g, 40a) after the Gophers' first 15 games in 2023-24.

Quest for Eighth National Title Minnesota has won seven national championships (2000, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2013, 2015, and 2016) and looks for a historic eighth title national crown in 2023-24.

The University of Minnesota women's hockey team won in a shootout against eighth-ranked St. Cloud State on Tuesday at Herb Brooks National Hockey Center.

Regulation and five minutes of overtime proved not enough, as the Gophers and Huskies went to a shootout to decide Tuesday's game after scoring one goal each.

Sophomore Allie Franco converted on the game-deciding shootout attempt, sending the Gophers back to Minneapolis with an extra point in the standings.

Junior goaltender Skylar Vetter started in net for the Maroon and Gold, making 29 saves.

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A closely-contested opening frame saw just one goal scored, as junior Peyton Hemp notched her seventh goal of the season off a feed from Madison Kaiser. Neither team capitalized on their powerplay opportunities, as six penalties were called in the first period but no powerplay goals scored.

The Huskies evened the score in the second period, as they found the back of the net just over five minutes into the frame. Both teams were again held scoreless on the powerplay, with another three penalties being called but no goals scored. Neither team was able to take control of the game in the final 20 minutes or overtime, and the Gophers were able to secure a shootout win.

Quotable "Really hard-fought win here as it always is in St. Cloud," head coach Brad Frost said. "But we gutted it out. We're excited to get those two points on the road and head back home to face the Badgers."

Notable - Gophers earn first shootout win since game against Wisconsin on Nov. 19, 2022 - Peyton Hemp scores her seventh goal of the season, now sits at 75 career points - Minnesota moves to 106-4-3 against St. Cloud State

Up Next The Gophers will host No. 3 Wisconsin for a must-see series on Dec. 8 and Dec. 9 at Ridder Arena. Puck drop is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. on Friday and 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, with both games being broadcast on B1G+.

Central Minnesota Dazzles with Must-See Christmas Light Displays

(KNSI) — If you’re thinking about hopping in the Wagon Queen Family Truckster and checking out Christmas and holiday light displays, look no further than right here in central Minnesota.The half mile long Lights in the Country display in Albany features lights synced to music, and you don’t even have to get out of your car. There’s also a photo op with a six foot wreath and parking to stop and take it all in. The display runs Sundays through Thursdays, 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Weekends, 5:00 p.m. to midnight. It...

(KNSI) — If you’re thinking about hopping in the Wagon Queen Family Truckster and checking out Christmas and holiday light displays, look no further than right here in central Minnesota.

The half mile long Lights in the Country display in Albany features lights synced to music, and you don’t even have to get out of your car. There’s also a photo op with a six foot wreath and parking to stop and take it all in. The display runs Sundays through Thursdays, 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Weekends, 5:00 p.m. to midnight. It’s open through January 7th. Lights in the Country is located at 36252 245th Avenue, Albany.

Santa’s Pioneer Village in Albany is at the Stearns County Pioneer Grounds. It’s a drive through light display open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m.

Albertville Lights is 30,000 lights synced to music and is open seven nights a week from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. The display is at 5669 Large Avenue Northeast and is open through January 6th. Mr. Creed’s Lights, also in Albertville, has 32,000 lights synced to music. Other homes on the same block have gotten into the spirit, so driving through is a real treat. Mr. Creed’s Lights is on Sundays through Thursdays from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. It’s located at 6813 67th Street Northeast through January 6th. Christmas on Kalenda is 15,000 lights synced to music. It’s open seven nights a week from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. It’s at 4980 Kalenda NE through December 31st.

Bulbs of Becker is a light show synchronized to music. The lights are on from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Sundays through Thursdays, and 5:00 to 10:00 p.m., Friday through Sunday. They are also collecting snacks for the Becker Backpack Buddies. Find it at 10221 18th Avenue in Becker.

Detersland Lights, also in Becker, has over 30,000 lights and handmade displays. It runs every night from 5:00 to 100:00 p.m. through January 1st.

Freeport’s Stop n’ Listen is 25,000 lights synced to music with a 20 foot tall Santa, walkway through the yard with an arch and mistletoe. There is also a collection for a single mom of two kids, one of whom is battling a brain tumor. It’s open Sunday through Thursday, 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:00 to 11:00 p.m. until January 6th. Stop n’ Listen is at 42757 Woodview Road.

Light Up Princeton is a light display and collection point for the local food shelf. The event is free, but they are taking free will offerings and nonperishable food items for the Princeton Food Pantry. This is a drive through display at Riverside Park, also synced to music. It’s open December 7th, 8th, 9th, 14th, 15th, and 16th and December 21st, 22nd, and 23rd from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. Riverside Park is at 300 Rum River Drive.

There are two homes directly across the street from each other in St. Augusta. Both houses and yards are chock full of Christmas decorations and lights, inflatables and figurines. It’s at 2190 246th Street.

St. Cloud Lights Festival is open at Spalt Park through December 10th. It’s $5 to walk through the winter wonderland as a fundraiser for the St. Cloud Christian School to transform the park into a student recess area.

St. Michael’s Holiday Lights on 20th Street has 40,000 lights synced to music. It’s open seven nights a week from 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. They are also collecting donations for the Hanover Area Food Shelf. The display is open through December 30th and can be found at 11594 20th Street NE in St. Michael.

Sartell’s COUNTRY Lights Festival is 33 acres of a walk through light display at Lake Francis. It’s open every night through Christmas.

Also, in Sartell, there is a home on Riverside Avenue with lights synced to music. The show is on Sundays through Thursdays, 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., 1989 Riverside Lane.

Several homes in Sauk Rapids really get into the Christmas spirit, and one of them features over 200 lighted objects and 30,000 lights. The house is at 1036 Strawberry Lane. Others include 1000 Brook Court, 212 Summit Avenue, 1101 10th Avenue North, 1839 Perennial Lane Northeast, and 38 and 42 5th Avenue South.

Celebrate the Light of the World at Robbins Island Regional Park in Willmar. It started with one guy and grew into a family tradition. Now, Willmar Fests has taken it over. This year’s display is nearly 900,000 lights, powered by seven miles of extension cords and took over a thousand hours to set up. The display is drive thru and is open December 7th through the 13th from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. at Robbins Island Regional Park between Willmar and Foot Lakes.

More info is here.

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PHOENIX INVESTORS ACQUIRES FORMER ELECTROLUX GROUP FACILITY IN ST. CLOUD, MN

Building is available for immediate leasing opportunities.ST. CLOUD, Minn., Oct. 2, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- An affiliate of Phoenix Investors ("Phoenix") announced the acquisition of an approximately 922,444-square-foot industrial building located at 701 33rd Avenue N in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Featuring both office and warehouse space, the facility includes 31 dock doors, 9 drive-ins, and clear heights up to 28 feet. Situated on 50.55 acres and boasting 980 parking stalls, the property is primed for meaningful ...

Building is available for immediate leasing opportunities.

ST. CLOUD, Minn., Oct. 2, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- An affiliate of Phoenix Investors ("Phoenix") announced the acquisition of an approximately 922,444-square-foot industrial building located at 701 33rd Avenue N in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Featuring both office and warehouse space, the facility includes 31 dock doors, 9 drive-ins, and clear heights up to 28 feet. Situated on 50.55 acres and boasting 980 parking stalls, the property is primed for meaningful industrial engagement. The complex is already configured to support multi-tenant occupancy, includes heavy electric and related infrastructure, and is served by rail.

Constructed in 1950, the facility was formerly home to Electrolux Group and the company's upright freezer manufacturing and production until it closed its doors in late 2019. The facility was one of Electrolux Group's primary freezer manufacturing sites.

"We're very excited about this opportunity to put the vacant, underutilized property into reinvestment and reuse for quality tenants that can result in greater tax base and employment opportunities in St. Cloud, since Electrolux Group announced its closure," said St. Cloud Mayor Dave Kleis. "This property's been of interest to several industrial prospects since then, and we look forward to working with a newly engaged long-term property owner. This property is one of the largest available industrial facilities in Greater Minnesota and is located just 1 hour from the Minneapolis-Saint Paul 494/694 split."

"Since the announced closing of the plant, the city and its EDA has positioned itself for a resilient economic recovery, including a target industry analysis which identified regional amenities, workforce skills, and business expansion opportunities for precision manufacturing, automation, food manufacturing, and business software and applications," added Mayor Kleis. "As a result of this work, a $2.5 million federal EDA grant was awarded to St. Cloud Technical & Community College for the buildout of an advanced manufacturing training lab with state-of-the-art equipment, set to open late 2023."

"We are thrilled to add this excellent industrial facility to our portfolio and looking forward to seeing what reopening this property will do for the St. Cloud community," said Anthony Crivello, Executive Vice President & Managing Director of Phoenix Investors. "This property will prove to be a great opportunity for businesses looking for high-quality industrial space, especially as it can be leased immediately."

This acquisition highlights Phoenix's commitment to investing in the St. Cloud community and providing superior commercial real estate options to local businesses, as well as avenues for development and growth within the local workforce and economy.

The transaction was brokered by Paul J. Danko, Senior Managing Director at Savills. For more information or to schedule a tour of the property, please get in touch with the Phoenix team at https://phoenixinvestors.com/contact.

About Phoenix Investors

Phoenix Investors is the leading expert in the acquisition, renovation, and releasing of former manufacturing facilities in the United States. The revitalization of facilities throughout the continental United States leads to positively transforming communities and restarting the economic engine in the communities we serve. Our reconstruction and selective deconstruction of facilities provides a green alternative versus the standard demolition and replacement of legacy buildings. Phoenix's affiliate companies hold equity interests in a portfolio of industrial properties totaling approximately 71 million square feet spanning 29 states, delivering corporations with a cost-effective national footprint to dynamically supply creative solutions to meet their leasing needs.

For more information, please visit https://phoenixinvestors.com.

SOURCE Phoenix Investors

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