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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in St. Paul, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim St. Paul, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in St. Paul, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in St. Paul, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in St. Paul, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in St. Paul, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in St. Paul, MN

Kevin Giannino a two-school coach for York and St. Thomas girls teams

DOVER — Is it Wildcats on three, or is it Saints on three?It's one or the other for Kevin Giannino, depending on the season.Giannino spends his spring as the head coach of the York High School softball team and serves as the head coach of the St. Thomas Aquinas girls basketball team in the winter.And yes, there have been slip-ups for Giannino where he has referred to the Wildcats as the Saints. But Giannino wouldn't trade those few slip-ups for anything, as he loves coaching both teams."W...

DOVER — Is it Wildcats on three, or is it Saints on three?

It's one or the other for Kevin Giannino, depending on the season.

Giannino spends his spring as the head coach of the York High School softball team and serves as the head coach of the St. Thomas Aquinas girls basketball team in the winter.

And yes, there have been slip-ups for Giannino where he has referred to the Wildcats as the Saints. But Giannino wouldn't trade those few slip-ups for anything, as he loves coaching both teams.

"We've had a couple of funny moments where we've been in (the St. Thomas) huddle and I'll say, 'OK, Wildcats on three,' and they'll all look at me in the middle," Giannino said. "And vice-versa, I'll be in the Wildcat huddle, and I'll say, 'Saints on three,' and they'll look at me and say, 'wrong team, coach.' I blame it on my old age, but the girls get a kick out of it. It's always a funny moment sure enough, and that's happened, no question that's happened; it's usually early in the year."

Giannino led York to the Class B softball state championship last spring and hopes for a similar run with the Saints this winter, his fourth season at the school. Giannino said some of the Saints have given him a hard time for winning a state championship without them.

"It was kind of a fun moment," Giannino said.

Make no mistake, Giannino wants to share that same championship experience this winter at St. Thomas.

"We made a pledge that we would try to go after (the state championship) as well," Giannino said. "With the team we have this year, we have an opportunity to make a long run if we play together as a team. We have a lot of individual talent. The question is, can we come together like that York team did and potentially do something great again?"

Many of Giannino's basketball players — Maddie Karsonovich, Maia Scanlon, Amelia Anderson, Charlotte DeTolla, Morgan Wigmore, Genna Bolduc, Heather Johnstone, and Samantha Neal — won a Division III girls soccer state championship, beating Gilford, 2-1 in the title game.

Giannino has fun scrimmage with all his girls

On Saturday, Giannino's softball players, including Meg Daly, Ava Brent, Emily Estes, McKayla Kortes, Maddigan Fitzgerald, Nya Avery, and Lindsay Rivers, ventured over to St. Thomas Aquinas with their York basketball teammates for a preseason scrimmage.

"It's super funny," Brent said. "I was kind of nervous at first. I told (Giannino) 'I'm kind of scared to play you.' It was really fun and hearing him interact with his other kids was cool."

Both teams traded leads throughout the game, but it was the Saints' Elizabeth Flynn who nailed a 3-pointer with 10 seconds left to give the Saints a 55-52 win.

"Losing by a 3-pointer at the end of the game? We're definitely not going to hear the end of that," Kortes said. "I'm excited for softball season. (Giannino) is just a great guy."

Coaching at two schools? Only pros, no cons

Giannino, after thinking for a little while, said there really aren't any cons of coaching at two different schools — just pros.

"I think (both schools) are quite similar," Giannino said. "Teenage girl athletes, I find them to be incredible with some of the things they can do."

Whether it's St. Thomas Aquinas sophomore Emma Toriello scoring 15 points in her varsity debut last year, or Kortes throwing fastballs right by hitters on her way to another shutout, Giannino always finds the joy of watching his players perform at such high levels.

"Whether they are hitting a ball 200 feet over the center field fence, or hitting four 3-pointers in a row, I'm just amazed at what these girls can do," Giannino said. "Both schools just have outstanding athletes, just outstanding individual people and great kids. They came from great families, and both schools really stress education is prominent. I can't even tell you how many girls on both of these teams are in the National Honor Society, and then go on to just incredible schools."

"Coach Giannino really cares about the players he coaches," St. Thomas Aquinas High School athletic director and boys basketball head coach Dave Morissette said of Giannino. "Relationships are really important to him."

Coach takes his St. Thomas girls to see UNH women's game

Giannino took his Saints to the University of New Hampshire last Wednesday for a Division I game against Northeastern — a 51-41 win for the Wildcats.

The Saints were able to get on the floor to greet the UNH players as they came out.

"It was quite the event," Giannino said. "The girls really enjoyed it. It was a lot of team bonding opportunities and a good time. The girls got to experience what Division I basketball is all about.

"They all commented on the quickness of the game and how fast they were passing the ball and how the ball was moving around the key," Giannino said. "It was a good learning experience, and a good opportunity to do some team bonding at the same time ... and we brought (UNH) good luck."

Giannino said you can't dismiss the importance of team-bonding events, and it's something he's always done.

"We have nine seniors on our team, so we're really senior laden, but we had a transfer from Newburyport, and a couple of JV girls come up," Giannino said. "It's a new team, it's a new team dynamic. There's a lot to be said about getting to learn about each other on and off the court."

St. Paul City Council approves millions in relief for residents experiencing medical debt

Mayor Melvin Carter said he learned about this approach to ease the burden of medical debt on residents by researching what other cities were doing.ST PAUL, Minn. — St. Paul residents drowning in medical debt could soon see some relief.On Wednesday, the St. Paul City Council passed an $844 million budget for 2024. The plan called for an innovative medical debt relief program, in which the city will invest more than $1 million in American Rescue Plan funds into the nonprofit organization ...

Mayor Melvin Carter said he learned about this approach to ease the burden of medical debt on residents by researching what other cities were doing.

ST PAUL, Minn. — St. Paul residents drowning in medical debt could soon see some relief.

On Wednesday, the St. Paul City Council passed an $844 million budget for 2024. The plan called for an innovative medical debt relief program, in which the city will invest more than $1 million in American Rescue Plan funds into the nonprofit organization RIP Medical Debt. That investment will, in turn, provide more than $100 million in medical debt relief.

“The truth is, it’s not that creative,” St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter shared on Thursday, adding, “It’s what private sector companies do all the time. That’s the way debt works. If a company tries to collect on a $100 [medical] bill — and they can’t — then they sell it to some debt collection company for $50. And then they sell it to another one for $25. Debt trades for pennies on the dollar all the time.”

Carter’s office estimates the plan will benefit 45,000 St. Paul residents.

“We know medical debt hits every cross section of our community. We also know the medical debt hits low-income Americans, hits communities of color, particularly hard,” he said. “Our number one strategy for economic development in our city is to make sure that people have dollars in their pocket.”

Carter said he learned about this approach to providing financial relief, while ensuring ongoing access to medical care, by researching what other cities were doing. He specifically talked with Cleveland leaders after they passed a similar measure.

“I’m good friends with the mayor of Cleveland and when they announced their plan to do that this summer, I gave him a call and told him: ‘Hey, tell me about that.’ So, we made sure St. Paul was right behind them."

So far, health systems who stand to collect payment on delinquent accounts have expressed support for the plan, including M Health Fairview, HealthPartners, Allina Health and Children’s. But Carter has also heard from those who questioned whether this was the right way to spend federal pandemic relief funds.

“I heard people say: ‘Is that the right use of these funds? Is that the right role in municipal governance?’ I’ll tell you one thing that my years of public service taught me, is when we recognize a problem, our residents, our constituents are tired of hearing leaders saying, 'Maybe that’s somebody else’s job.' This is pandemic relief, and this is an initiative that is geared around access to health care.”

Under the plan, residents will need to financially qualify for the relief. According to the city, that includes residents with household income between zero percent and up to 400 percent of Federal Poverty Guidelines. Residents also qualify for relief if their medical debt represents five percent or more of their annual household income.

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Newly passed St. Paul budget includes $1.1 million for wiping away medical debt

This is a modal window.No compatible source was found for this media.This is a modal window.This video is currently unavailable.Newly passed St. Paul budget includes $1.1 million for wiping away medical debtMore than 43,000 people in St. Paul can expect to have their medical debt cleared under a new plan approved by the City Council.Mayor Melvin Carter first announced a ...

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Newly passed St. Paul budget includes $1.1 million for wiping away medical debt

More than 43,000 people in St. Paul can expect to have their medical debt cleared under a new plan approved by the City Council.

Mayor Melvin Carter first announced a medical debt forgiveness plan in August. He proposed using $1.1 million in unspent American Rescue Plan funds to pay for the program.

The council passed the plan in a 4-3 vote Wednesday night while considering amendments to the 2024 budget.

“I think it’s a great program. I’m excited to see the results. I think it will be very meaningful for the people it touches,” St. Paul City Council President Amy Brendmoen said.

Under the new initiative, the city will partner with a national nonprofit, RIP Medical Debt, which has been doing this type of work for nearly a decade in other parts of the country.

St. Paul will be the first city Minnesota city to partner with the nonprofit.

“We are excited to be doing this in St. Paul,” RIP Medical Debt President and CEO Allison Sesso said. “It really does matter that people get this debt taken off their plate.”

The nonprofit buys medical debt in bulk from hospitals and then frees qualifying patients of any obligation to that debt.

A patient will qualify for the program if their household income is at less than 400% of the federal poverty level or if their medical debt makes up 5% or more of their household income.

Sesso told 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS the nonprofit can purchase bundles of debt from hospitals at a 100:1 ratio, meaning every dollar spent can cancel $100 in medical debt.

“The people who owe that money can’t pay it. They don’t have the means, so it is severely marked down, and that’s the magic of our model,” Sesso said.

That means the $1.1 million invested by the city of St. Paul has the potential to wipe out $110 million in residents’ medical bills.

Several large hospital systems in the Twin Cities have signed on to this plan, including Children’s Minnesota.

“I think it’s a really good use of one-time American Rescue Plan dollars,” St. Paul City Council Member Chris Tolbert said.

The plan, however, only passed by the slimmest of margins Wednesday.

Jane Prince was one of the City Council members who voted against it, arguing the American Rescue Plan funding should be spent on other things.

“It is preposterous to say that the city doesn’t have $1.1 million in needs that this money could be spent on except for medical debt, just preposterous,” Prince said during Wednesday’s meeting.

She said it seems “random” for the city to dabble in private medical bills instead of using the money for core government services, such as addressing the homelessness crisis.

“We’re not keeping up with the role of the city in providing basic city services that people expect right now, so we shouldn’t be adopting a new area of endeavor that doesn’t relate to the core mission and services that the city should be providing,” Prince said. “A million dollars would go a long way toward helping the city in a number of different areas.”

Prince said she understands the desire to help residents with medical debt but believes other avenues should be explored for accomplishing that.

“If this is a goal we want to achieve, let’s do it with the parts of our government that deal with health care,” Prince said. “And did we ever engage with the hospitals in saying, isn’t this something you could do without us?”

Other city council members agreed during Wednesday night’s debate.

“I have concerns and I’ve heard concerns from my constituents about spending public dollars on private individuals’ medical bills,” City Council Member Rebecca Noecker said.

The mayor, meanwhile, provided this statement to 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS about the passage of the 2024 budget:

“From public safety to medical debt, this budget makes bold investments in our future while maintaining the discipline behind our city’s perfect credit rating. I appreciate the Council passing it.”

RIP Medical Debt said there is no firm timeline for when medical debt will start to be cleared for St. Paul residents but noted the work with the city and local hospitals will begin immediately.

“I ask people to be patient. It will happen but it does take some time,” Sesso said.

Disney On Ice presents Find Your Hero

Event InfoGet ready to discover the hero inside us all when Disney On Ice returns to St. Paul with a magical adventure for the whole family! Audiences will discover what it truly means to be a hero as Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse and friends from around the Disney Kingdom come together to take families on a journey through timeless tales when Disney On Ice presents Find Your Hero skates into St. Paul from December 7–10, 2023 at Xcel Energy C...

Event Info

Get ready to discover the hero inside us all when Disney On Ice returns to St. Paul with a magical adventure for the whole family! Audiences will discover what it truly means to be a hero as Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse and friends from around the Disney Kingdom come together to take families on a journey through timeless tales when Disney On Ice presents Find Your Hero skates into St. Paul from December 7–10, 2023 at Xcel Energy Center.

Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck and Goofy set the stage for an adventure filled with tales of heroism from your favorite Disney stories in Disney On Ice presents Find Your Hero. Join Mirabel as she sets out to save her family’s beloved Casita, all while learning that everyone has their own gifts, magical or not, and being true to yourself and loving those around you is what makes you special. See how far Moana will go when she embarks on an action-packed voyage with mighty demigod Maui in a quest to save her island, become a wayfinder, and find her own identity. Dive “Under The Sea” and test the power of true love with The Little Mermaid. Journey alongside Anna and Elsa and the hilarious snowman, Olaf, on their quest to protect the kingdom. Get tangled with Rapunzel as she dares to explore the world outside her own. And be there as Belle boldly tames the fearsome Beast. Discover that courage, determination and heart are all part of the hero in you!

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For enhanced safety and speed of entry, we encourage guests not to bring bags of any kind. Bags, purses and backpacks are not allowed. Clutch, wristlet and wallets sized 4" x 6" x 1.5" or smaller are allowed and subject to inspection. Medical bags and diaper bags are allowed, however, they are required to pass through x-ray screening prior to entry. Guests with medical and diaper bags must enter the arena at Gate 1. Please allow extra time for entry.

Mobile Entry

Pro tip for faster mobile entry: Add your tickets to your phone's "wallet" and have a fully charged battery. This bypasses the need for Wi-Fi or cellular data at the gates.

Mobile tickets are like an airline boarding pass which can be accessed with a smartphone via the Ticketmaster app or mobile site in a bar code format and scanned at the gate for entry. Mobile tickets are protected by Ticketmaster’s SafeTix™ technology. SafeTix™ continually generates a new and unique barcode that automatically refreshes every few seconds so the barcode cannot be stolen or copied, keeping your tickets safe and secure. Screen shots are not accepted for entry.

Click here for more details on mobile tickets.

Cashless Payment Only

Only credit card and mobile payment (Apple Pay, Google Pay, etc.) are accepted for concessions, retail and parking transactions. Only credit card payment is accepted for box office transactions. Cash is not accepted.

St. Paul council vote wipes away medical debt for thousands of residents

ST. PAUL, Minn. (FOX 9) - An estimated 43,000 people in St. Paul won't be weighed down by medical debt after the council passed its city budget Wednesday evening."I have had constituents reach out to me who stated that they were excited about the idea of no longer having the burden of medical debt," said Mitra Jalali, the St. Paul Ward 4 council member.The city is teaming up with a national organization called RIP Medical Debt. There is an income criterion for residents, but for every dollar invested,...

ST. PAUL, Minn. (FOX 9) - An estimated 43,000 people in St. Paul won't be weighed down by medical debt after the council passed its city budget Wednesday evening.

"I have had constituents reach out to me who stated that they were excited about the idea of no longer having the burden of medical debt," said Mitra Jalali, the St. Paul Ward 4 council member.

The city is teaming up with a national organization called RIP Medical Debt. There is an income criterion for residents, but for every dollar invested, $100 in medical debt is relieved. At least four large, local health systems have supported the initiative, including M Health Fairview, HealthPartners, Allina Health, and Children's.

Mayor Melvin Carter first proposed the Medical Debt Reset Initiative during his August budget address. The city will use a one-time $1.1 million investment of American Rescue Plan funds, which will provide an estimated $110 million in medical debt relief.

"This program is not just about wiping away debts; it is about giving people a chance to breathe, to rebuild, and to reclaim their lives without the weight of medical bills crushing their aspirations," Carter said in August.

However, during Wednesday's council meeting, multiple members questioned whether the initiative is the best use of federal funds when some city leaders haven't heard medical debt as a concern from constituents.

"They want potholes fixed. They want the lights on. They want their taxes not to go up so much. And this is just so random," said Jane Prince, the council member from Ward 7.

Nelsie Yang, the Ward 6 council member, introduced an amendment that would have eliminated the appropriation for RIP Medical Debt from Wednesday’s budget vote, tabling the proposal until next year. She mentioned other initiatives she thought the council should prioritize instead, such as pandemic pay for city workers or helping Catholic Charities with its budget shortfalls.

"I know that we have a lot of residents who right now are facing medical debt, but the truth is they don't have to live in fear, especially with corporations that could just choose to cancel the debt in the first place," Yang said.

Jalali reminded her colleagues that the federal COVID-19 relief funds are meant to help governments recover from the pandemic.

"I'm just confused at how helping people pay medical bills, many of which were probably accrued during the pandemic, is not an eligible expense?" she said.

RIP Medical Debt has said the initiative will help improve patients' credit scores and increase access to medical care. City leaders have noted that medical debt is more prevalent in communities in color.

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