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Roofing insurance supplements

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Claims?

Why Hire a Company to Help with Roofing Insurance Supplements in Woodbury, MN?

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Are you interested in reducing expenses and increasing profits for your expanding roofing business? You can achieve these goals without compromising quality. As a roofer, you understand that every project is critical to your company's financial success. Given the high level of competition in the industry, it's important to seek ways to gain an edge over your competitors continuously.

For many roofing contractors, having a team of insurance restoration consultants to handle tasks like Xactimate writing is the solution they need to gain that edge. Here are just a few of the most common reasons why roofing contractors like you trust IRC Estimates for help with roofing insurance supplements.

Roofing Insurance Claim Woodbury, MN

Great Xactimate Training is Hard to Find

When insurance adjusters prepare claims, they rely on a software program called Xactimate. This program allows them to input large amounts of data and corresponding codes to generate a claim. However, if an adjuster lacks knowledge about roofing, the generated claim may not be accurate. Adjusters are required to follow their company's standard policies, which means that the information generated for a claim is entirely decided by the insurer.

Unfortunately, this can be bad news for homeowners and roofing contractors who are trying to complete a job. The claim generated by an adjuster may not account for overhead and profit or other contractor expenses. But with Xactimate training from companies like IRC Estimates, you can help ensure your claims are accurate and account for the expenses you need to get your roofing job done right. Contact our office today to learn more about how our team helps roofing contractors with Xactimate training and more.

Help Ensure You're Doing Your Best Work

Without roofing insurance supplements in Woodbury, MN, it can be easy for an insurance adjuster to miss certain types of damage when they're assessing a roofing job. While an adjuster's job is to estimate the extent of the damage, their estimate is only an approximation. Supplementing a project can help ensure that all issues, damage, and necessary materials are properly calculated, so you can confidently have all the supplies and preparation needed to complete the job to the best of your ability.

The Process of Supplementing Takes Time You Don't Have

Insurance company desk adjusters often find themselves spending a significant amount of time completing monotonous tasks like estimating claims for homeowners who have experienced structural damage and require financial assistance for repairs. These tasks, which can include negotiating, make up the bulk of what they do for their 40-hour work week. They don't have business obligations and client needs to exceed.

Smaller roofing companies, on the other hand, may not have the financial resources to hire a team of adjusters or estimators to help counter insurance claims with supplements. As a result, they either spend time doing the supplements themselves or hire someone with less knowledge or skill to complete the task. This not only negatively impacts their bottom line, but it is also not a cost or time-efficient approach. By relying on a company that specializes in roofing insurance supplement assistance for contractors, you can potentially free up your time and focus more on serving customers.

Office Turnover Hurts

Small roofing contractors who choose to hire office staff to handle supplement preparation and multitasking may face high turnover rates. As previously mentioned, the work can be time-consuming and tedious, causing entry-level employees to tire quickly and seek better opportunities elsewhere. Furthermore, most office staff may lack the proficiency required to operate Xactimate software and may not have on-the-job experience with roofing projects.

Essentially, you may end up with an insurance adjuster on staff. Is that something you really want to consider?

Rejected Roofing Insurance Supplements are Real

One crucial point to note is that inexperienced preparers often overlook important aspects when creating roof supplements. Without adequate knowledge, they may not be able to prepare the supplement accurately and may take a longer time to submit it, which could result in a rejection from the insurance company.

Additionally, untrained office staff may not be able to fully maximize the supplement for a claim and verify its authorization, which can lead to missed opportunities for the business owner to receive the full amount they are entitled to.

Keeping It "In-House" Isn't Always Wise

Are you considering handling roof supplements on your own, or are you open to outsourcing to a skilled team of experts? While it may seem like a wise decision to keep the process in-house in the short term, that may not work for long. Without someone by your side with years of roofing supplement experience, you could be missing as much info as the inexperienced adjuster with whom you're fed up. That's why roofing contractors use companies like IRC Estimates - to ensure they get the materials and compensation they truly deserve to do the best job possible.

FAQs About Roofing Insurance Supplements in Woodbury, MN

As insurance restoration consultants, IRC Estimates works with a wide range of roofing contractors throughout the year. Some are brand-new at what they do and need help understanding the nuance or work involved with roofing supplements, Xactimate writing, and construction restoration in general. And that's OK - everyone has got to start somewhere.

Whether you're a new roofing contractor feeling lost or you're a seasoned expert looking to brush up on your knowledge, keep reading. Below are just a few of the most frequently asked questions that our roofing insurance supplement consultants handle daily.

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What's the point in supplementing roofing jobs? I'm busy enough as it is.

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This is one of the most asked-about topics that we hear at IRC Estimates. And the answer is simple - to get paid what you should be getting paid on roofing insurance claims jobs. What that means is you get paid the actual cost to do the job that you accepted correctly, such as:

  • Quantity of Materials
  • Installation Best Practices
  • Adhering to Building Code Mandates
  • More

The truth is that insurance companies aren't the enemy, but they sure do make mistakes. It's up to you, as the roofing contractor, to discover and remediate those mistakes - not just for you but for your roofing client. The fact is that your clients hire you because they believe you're an expert at filing and managing roof insurance claims. By supplementing those claims, you're both demonstrating your expertise while providing excellent service and results. If you don't have the time to do so, it's wise to search for professional help with your roofing insurance supplements.

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Is there a set number of roofing jobs that I should supplement?

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The quick answer is that you should review all of your roofing jobs to see if they need to be supplemented. Remember that consistency is key here. By having a clear and standardized process for thorough inspections, it will be easier to determine if your roofing project requires a supplement and easier to file one too.

The best way to achieve this is by giving your sales reps clear guidelines on how all roof inspections should be conducted. Top contractors use inspection checklists and photo checklists to ensure that all damage and necessary materials are properly documented for the job. While this may add an additional 15-30 minutes to the sales reps' current process, it will benefit your roofing business in many ways.

If you're just starting out and need some help on how to optimize this process, contact IRC Estimates today to speak with one of our consultants.

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When is the right time to think about roofing insurance supplements in Woodbury, MN?

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When it comes to roofing supplements, there are two opportune times to submit them: Pre-Production (before installation) and Post-Production (after installation, but before depreciation is released). The most effective method is to file both Pre-Production and Post-Production supplements for insurance roofing jobs.

For Pre-Production supplements, it's best to write or send them to a supplementing company as soon as the adjuster has provided the full scope of loss. This is because it can take the adjuster and carrier several days to settle these claims, and it's important to avoid scheduling an installation if there are expensive Xactimate line items that haven't been approved yet. Often, when a Pre-Production supplement is approved, the carrier will send an extra ACV check to the homeowner for the additional line items on the revised estimate.

Contractors with effective roof inspection processes tend to have faster turnaround times on Pre-Production supplements and encounter fewer scheduling issues. When they don't have those processes in place, they often use a trusted partner like IRC Estimates, with years of experience managing Xactimate software and roofing issues covered by insurance.

Your Trusted Choice for Roofing Insurance Supplements in Woodbury, MN

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IRC Estimates offers a comprehensive range of roofing insurance supplement services for roofing contractors, including Xactimate claim writing and management, claims administration, estimates, and consulting services. Our dedication to roofing contractors enables them to streamline their operations and reduce costs by either outsourcing their claims administration entirely or learning how to manage it themselves.

Whatever your goals may be, IRC Estimates is here to help you expedite your services and grow your roofing business, one roofing insurance claim at a time. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help you maximize every roof claim that comes across your desk by using supplements.

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Latest News in Woodbury, MN

Just Sold: Woodbury medical office draws $9.8 million

Editor’s note: “Just Sold” is a Finance & Commerce feature based on the newest certificates of real estate value filed with the Minnesota Department of Revenue for commercial sales throughout Minnesota and reports of sales across the country involving local parties. Research includes company and broker documents, online real estate listings, F&C archives, Catylist and other research.Valley Creek Office Centre, a fully leased, 33,520-square-foot medical office at 1687 Woodlane Drive in Woodbury, has s...

Editor’s note: “Just Sold” is a Finance & Commerce feature based on the newest certificates of real estate value filed with the Minnesota Department of Revenue for commercial sales throughout Minnesota and reports of sales across the country involving local parties. Research includes company and broker documents, online real estate listings, F&C archives, Catylist and other research.

Valley Creek Office Centre, a fully leased, 33,520-square-foot medical office at 1687 Woodlane Drive in Woodbury, has sold for $9.8 million.

MMPF III Woodbury MN LLC, an entity located in Nashville, Tennessee, acquired the building from OBGYN CONSULTANTS PLLC in Woodbury in a cash sale that closed Sept. 28.

The certificate of real state value describing the sale indicates the buyer’s internal development team contacted the seller directly.

The two-story building was developed in 1980 on 2.23 acres along Interstate 494. The current seller bought it in 2018 for $2.75 million. The current price works out to $292.36 per square foot.

The building is home to Minnesota Women’s Health P.A., OBGYN & Specialty Care. The tenant roster includes nearly two dozen providers of care aimed at women.

Minnesota Women’s Health also has locations in Maplewood, Apple Valley and Hudson, Wisconsin.

This is the second significant medical office sale in Woodbury in a month.

In September, the longtime owners of the Woodwinds Medical Building in Woodbury sold it for $8.4 million in an internal reorganization of the members of the ownership group.

Place: 1687 Woodlane Drive, Woodbury

Price: $9.8 million; cash; $292.36 per square foot

Buyer: MMPF III Woodbury MN LLC Nashville, Tennessee

Seller: OBGYN CONSULTANTS PLLC, Woodbury

Date: 9-28-23

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Cord-Sets CEO buys company’s Minneapolis plant

Matt Coey started working for Cord-Sets Inc. 18 years ago and five years ago became president and CEO.

Now he owns the company’s 36,300-square-foot plant and offices located on a 1.21-acre site at 1015 N. Fifth St. in Minneapolis. The Banana Stand Properties LLC acquired the real estate for $3.25 million from a family trust related to company founder William Campbell. The price works out to $89.53 per square foot.

Campbell started the company in 1952, and today it has 50 employees, a separate warehouse in Minneapolis and a plant in China. Cord-Sets Inc. manufactures custom power supply cords, extension cords, cable assemblies, jumpers, and wire harnesses.

“There’s not a lot of us out there,” Coey said.

The property acquisition won’t change the company, he said, but it does mark a new chapter in its story.

Place: 1015 N. Fifth St. in Minneapolis

Price: $3.25 million; new mortgage; $89.53 per square foot

Buyer: The Banana Stand Properties LLC, Minneapolis

Seller: William J. Campbell LLC, Mound

Date: 9-21-23

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South Washington County schools to hold special election with a $200 million bond measure

The Nov. 7 ballot also includes a $60 million levy that addresses technology projects like cybersecurity.WOODBURY, Minn. — On November 7th, voters across Minnesota will weigh in on dozens of education-related ballot questions.In the South Washington County school district, which covers cities like Woodbury and Cottage Grove, there will be two bond questions and a technology levy question on the ballot totaling $260 million.Last year, voters rejected the district's request, which at that point, was the state's large...

The Nov. 7 ballot also includes a $60 million levy that addresses technology projects like cybersecurity.

WOODBURY, Minn. — On November 7th, voters across Minnesota will weigh in on dozens of education-related ballot questions.

In the South Washington County school district, which covers cities like Woodbury and Cottage Grove, there will be two bond questions and a technology levy question on the ballot totaling $260 million.

Last year, voters rejected the district's request, which at that point, was the state's largest school bond measure at $463 million. This time it's slashed in half.

"For anyone who says they haven't heard the information, they have not had their eyes and ears open," said Superintendent Julie Nielsen, who says the district has hosted at least 60 informational meetings this year and mailed postcards to residents.

"We believe that this is the community's plan and took into account tax tolerance, as well as the importance that our community said around safety and security," said Nielsen.

The bond measure is broken down into two bond questions. The first question is about safety and security enhancements at secondary schools, including East Ridge High School which is already 30% over capacity.

The second question addresses elementary school space and includes renovations for bathrooms. The second question is contingent on the passage of question one. Without the approval of question one, elementary school attendance boundary changes will be implemented for the 2024-25 school year.

"These are really things that we're at the point of needing," said Nielsen.

The third question is about a technology levy to address cybersecurity, devices and repairs, among other things. In all, that could mean about a $136 property tax every year on a $500,000 home.

"While we're optimistic, and we've worked hard to get the information out, we also know at the end of the day it is in our taxpayer's hands," said Nielsen, who also notes that 70% of area residents don't have students in the school district.

When asked what happens if the bond measure doesn't pass, Nielson said, "We will continue working. We cannot continue to not have seats for our students."

Nielsen expects about 20,000 new students in the next five years - students she says the district is committed to supporting.

The bond measure is also so much smaller that it's already not meeting some of the other needs of the district - meaning it can no longer fund an alternative high school, early learning programs and programs for 18-22-year-olds.

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Woodbury pauses some future development due to PFAS treatment challenges

The City of Woodbury is limiting development as it works to treat PFAS detected in the water.This summer, the city restricted how often homeowners could water their lawns in an attempt to reduce the impact of PFAS. City leaders hope slowing development will additionally help to ensure safe drinking water until they get closer to having a permanent water treatment plant in place.Woodbury has long-term development goals in place. According to city officials, the average growth rate in new growth areas between 2011 to 2022 was 328...

The City of Woodbury is limiting development as it works to treat PFAS detected in the water.

This summer, the city restricted how often homeowners could water their lawns in an attempt to reduce the impact of PFAS. City leaders hope slowing development will additionally help to ensure safe drinking water until they get closer to having a permanent water treatment plant in place.

Woodbury has long-term development goals in place. According to city officials, the average growth rate in new growth areas between 2011 to 2022 was 328 units per year, just shy of the 400 housing units per year projected to be built between 2012 to 2029. The city has decided to push back development on a few parcels of land scheduled for upcoming development phases.

“The root cause really has to do with PFAS that’s in our water,” said Mayor Anne Burt. “We think it might be time to slow growth down a little bit as work at building a permanent treatment plant to treat that water for PFAS.”

The so-called forever chemicals were made by and disposed of by 3M in the east metro. Within the last several years, the Minnesota Department of Health has put advisories on nine of Woodbury’s 20 wells. City officials told 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS three of the wells remain offline, but two will be brought back with interim treatment in 2024, while the remaining well will be abandoned. Another six wells are being treated through a temporary plant.

The City anticipates future advisories may be placed on wells.

Sandeep Burman, Environmental Health Manager at the Minnesota Department of Health, explained by saying “Health risk advisories can be issued as a result of changes in sampling results as well as updates to PFAS guidance or standards for drinking water. The Drinking Water Protection program at the Minnesota Department of Health monitors this dynamic situation very closely and responds quickly and as needed to protect public health, including by issuing advisories.”

A permanent treatment plant is expected to be online in Woodbury by about 2028, according to Burt.

“This is the largest public works project we’ve had in the city and it just takes a lot of time and effort and cost to make that happen,” said Burt. “So in the meantime, we need to make sure that we’re supplying good quality water to the community and at the same time with all of this growth, reduce it a little bit.”

The City Council in July approved a plan to delay development in a few specific areas in the southern part of the city, including at Dale Road and Collage Grove Drive.

According to Burt, landowners can still sell to developers, but the city won’t start accepting building applications for the areas outlined until about 2026.

Development will be allowed in other parts of the city.

“There are still parts of the city that are available for development and have been for a number of years and if a project comes forward in an area we may agree to do so,” said Burt. “We’ve already agreed to several projects that are underway so we’re not going to see growth stop by any means, we’re just not going to see new things come in certain areas of the city.”

There are about four to five years of development activity still expected in the city, according to City Planner Eric Searles. He says about 1,500 units already have final or preliminary approval.

“The public should not expect to not see any construction activity anywhere in the city because of this,” said Council Member Steve Morris at the July Meeting.

When Is Santa Claus Coming To Woodbury?

Get ready, because Santa Claus is coming to Woodbury! This holiday season, the man in red is spreading holiday joy all over town. So get those wishlists ready, be on your best behavior (Santa knows if you've been bad or good!) and mark your calendar. Here's when and where you can catch Santa in the Woodbury area this year!Please note: Event dates are subject to change or cancellation. We recommend calling ahead to confirm and making reservations when possible. When: Saturday, Dec. 2 ...

Get ready, because Santa Claus is coming to Woodbury! This holiday season, the man in red is spreading holiday joy all over town. So get those wishlists ready, be on your best behavior (Santa knows if you've been bad or good!) and mark your calendar. Here's when and where you can catch Santa in the Woodbury area this year!

Please note: Event dates are subject to change or cancellation. We recommend calling ahead to confirm and making reservations when possible.

When: Saturday, Dec. 2 Where: Central Park - Valley Creek Room - 8595 Central Park Place; Woodbury, MN 55125What: Hey, guess what? Santa's taking a break from toy-making! You can hang out with him and his crew, decorate some cookies, get crafty for the holidays and snap a pic together. Just remember to bring your own camera and a super big smile for Santa! Registration is required, and the cost is $15 per child. Click here for more info.

When: Select dates Nov. 24 - Dec. 23 (see calendar for times)Where: Woodbury Lakes - 9020 Hudson Road; Woodbury, MN 55125What: Keep an eye out for Santa at Woodbury Lakes this holiday season! He'll be swinging by stores and restaurants, lending an ear to Christmas wishes and striking a pose for selfies. Make sure to check times and dates ahead of your visit! Click here for more info.

When: Nov. 4 - Dec. 24Where: 8400 Hudson Rd, Woodbury, MN 55125What: Experience the magic of Christmas at Santa’s Wonderland! Registration is required, but it's easy and free. You get one complimentary photo with the big man and the option to purchase more as part of a package. Click here for more info.

When: TBAWhere: Mall of America®, 60 E Broadway, Bloomington, MN 55425What: The short trek to MOA® is well worth it for an elf-guided tour and heart-to-heart with Santa himself! A ticket is required for each Candy Cane Institute visitor. Click here for more info.

Happy holidays, Woodbury! Wishing you a joyful season filled with warmth and happiness.

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HealthPartners to build $50.5 million specialty clinic in Woodbury

HealthPartners is continuing to expand in Woodbury, breaking ground this month on a new $50.5 million clinic offering specialty care services in the east metro suburb.The project is another sign that health systems are resuming capital investments after financial shocks from the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic and ballooning expense with ongoing staffing problems.Based in Bloomington, HealthPartners says the new 55,000-square-foot, two-story facility is needed to keep up with patient demand in Woodbury and nearby communit...

HealthPartners is continuing to expand in Woodbury, breaking ground this month on a new $50.5 million clinic offering specialty care services in the east metro suburb.

The project is another sign that health systems are resuming capital investments after financial shocks from the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic and ballooning expense with ongoing staffing problems.

Based in Bloomington, HealthPartners says the new 55,000-square-foot, two-story facility is needed to keep up with patient demand in Woodbury and nearby communities. The health system expects it will be completed by winter 2024.

HealthPartners is one of Minnesota's largest nonprofit groups, with just over half its revenue coming from a large health insurance business. Its network of hospitals and outpatient centers includes Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Methodist Hospital in St. Louis Park and Park Nicollet clinics.

Hospitals and clinics have been struggling financially over the last two years due to high labor costs amid a scarcity of workers in Minnesota, although in recent months there have been signs of improvement.

Minneapolis-based Allina Health System announced in February 2022 that it was building a 10-story inpatient facility at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, a project with a $1.2 billion price tag. The Allina board this year approved an expansion for outpatient services in Eden Prairie, but the health system also paused plans for a replacement hospital in Cambridge.

Last September, the state cleared plans for Fairview Health Services and a for-profit company to jointly build a new $62 million mental health hospital in St. Paul. Construction of the new facility was expected to start in mid-2023 with an opening in the second half of 2025, the Minneapolis-based health system told bondholders last month.

At HealthPartners, the new specialty center will be located on City Place Boulevard, within a half-mile of the health system's TRIA Orthopedic Center Woodbury.

HealthPartners opened a Melrose Center clinic for eating disorder patients in 2018 in Woodbury, where the nonprofit group for many years has run a primary care clinic.

In July 2020, HealthPartners announced it was permanently closing seven clinics and a drug and alcohol treatment program at locations across the Twin Cities and St. Cloud, saying the pandemic had accelerated a shift away from brick-and-mortar clinics.

Last year, HealthPartners saw $8.22 billion revenue across its businesses, covering $8.13 billion in expenses, according to a Star Tribune review of financial statements. The remaining $87.7 million in operating income last year was lower than in 2021, when HealthPartners posted $139.7 million in operating income.

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